Skip to main content

Full text of "Students' herald"

/rV^> 




Students' Herald 



(pufiftB^ 6^ f$t £tubente of t^ <&<M0<X0 

#Kafe (?lgticuftu*af Cottle 

0(tUn$6ftatt 




J 



/ 



- 



> * 



(Daeafton (ttuntfet 
1905 



• 



amm 



\' 



< ■ i 
' t 




GO TO 



GEO. S. GRASS 



FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN 



GROCERIES 



And remember that 



QUALITY IS A TRUE TEST OF CHEAPNESS 

Everything: kept usually found in a first-class grocery store. We solicit your trade 

and expect It only by fair treatment. 

. . . . 

YOURS TO PLEASE, 

Geo. b. CjRass 






X. 




m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






AGRICULTURAL 

STUDENTS 



of the K. S. A. C. and 



FARMERS OF THE STATE 

We desire to eall your attention to the 

Manta* Qljjricufturaf 

(Kernes 



SUBSCRIBE 
NOW 



w 



SUBSCRI 
NOW 



A monthly agricultural journal published at the 
Kansas Agricultural College by agricultural stu- 
dents during the College year. The paper has 
been successfully started, is free from financial 
incumbrances and the subscription lists are rapidly 
growing. 



5UP5CR1PE NOW 

While you can still take advantage of the 50-cent 
rate. This special rate will be withdrawn at the 
beginning of this College year. Now is your op- 
portunity to help a worthy enterprise. Your name 
and address and fifty cents will secure the paper 
for you for one year. 

Address, Kansas flgrlcoituial Eevicw, - fflannattan, Kan. 




2 



THE STUDENTS HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 



DRY-GOODS ROOM: 

Mohair Dress Goods will 
be worn another season^ 
our stock of this* favor- 
ite material is better this 
year than last. Tennis 
Flannel, Shaker Flan- 
nel, Percales, Ginghams, 
Cheviots, Cotton or 
Wool Blankets, Hosiery, 
Underwear, etc. 

READY-TO-WEAR ROOM: 

Id this room we carry Tailor- 
Made Suits, Skirts, Shirt 
Waists, Muslin Underskirts, 
Infants' Caps, Aprons, Neck- 
wear, etc. 



SHOE DEPARTMENT: 

If you will mention the 
name Krippendorf-Ditt- 
mann when you come in 
to get Ladies' Shoes, or 
Rice & Hutch i n g6 when 
you want Men's Shoes, 
you will get shoes that 
will not only fit well, but 
will wear well. 

HARDWARE ROOM: 

Our stock is in fine shape 
in this department. We 
handle the celebrated 
"Keen Kutter" Goods, 



BUch as Razors, Knives, 
Axes, and many others. 
Stoves and Ranges, 
Builders! Hardware, 
Paints, and Glass. 

GROCERY ROOM: 

This Is one- of the most im- 
portant departments. A com- 
plete assortment Staple and 
Fancy Groceries, all Fruits 
and Vegetables In Season <ind 
many little items used in the 
borne that you will not And 
In tiny other grocery in town. 

QUEENSWARE, GLASS- 
WARE, LAMPS, ETC. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



PASTE IN YOUR HAT 



TUB Leafier 




The Leader 



THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 
"Courtney's Fnll-Vamp Shoes are Good Enough for Me" 

SOLD ONL.Y BY 



THE LEADER 



MOORE BROS. & CO 




publismeo 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottalietEvejyGaeCttltivateHis OianOeniwa. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., August 3, 1905. 



Number 1 



New Students 

The College will probably open this fall with 
between five and six hundred new students, 
many of them away from home for the first 
time. You will be met at the stations by com- 
mittees from the Young Men's and Young 
Women's Christian Associations. They will be 
provided with lists of rooming and boarding 
places, including prices and locations. It is 
not well to scrimp on room and board. Get a 
comfortable room, well lighted and ventilated, 
and one that can be heated when necessary. 
The distance from College is not essential. 
College duties do not begin until 8:15 a. m., and 
a brisk morning walk will do most of you good. 
The selection of a good boarding place will be 
the more difficult. Tastes differ. You will 
need good, wholesome food— not necessarily 
expensive, but well prepared. You will do well 
to eat rather sparingly at first. Most of you 
have been in active physical work and the 
temptation to over-eat will be quite strong. 
Take plenty of exercise. Having selected a 
room and a place to board, you can begin to 
feel at home; and that reminds me that you 
may be home-sick. The best cure for home- 
sickness is not to have it, but that is easier 
written than done. The best remedy for home- 
sickness is work—something to do. You should 
have arrived here Tuesday, September 19, in 
time to get located. Come to College Wednes- 
day morning by 9 a. M., for matriculation and 
assignment. You can then buy your books and 
begin studying. Homesickness will not have 
much of a chance before an open book. 

Go to church the first Sunday and every one 
thereafter. Many young people, and older ones 
too, for that matter, think they can neglect 
their church attendance after moving to a new 
place. This is a great mistake. You will need 



to attend church more than ever while away 
from home influences. All denominations are 
represented in Manhattan, and you will be 
welcomed in any and all of them. Most of the 
churches hold sociables for new students. This 
will give you an opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with many of the best citizens of your 
College home town, as well as with each other. 

Join some one of the literary societies; but 
you will not need to hurry about that. Visit 
all of them. Select the one that comes nearest 
your ideal and apply for membership. Mem- 
bership in a literary society is very valuable- 
it will give you a training that can be obtained 
in no other way. 

Be happy and you will make others happy. 
"Laugh and the world laughs with you, weep 
and you weep alone." Don't wait to be intro- 
duced to everybody; get acquainted. 

To sum up: Get a good rooming and board- 
ing place, economize elsewhere if necessary. 

Do not eat too much, and take plenty of ex- 
ercise. 

Go to some church every Sunday. 

Be prompt in all things. 

Be happy and make others happy. 

E. R. Nichols. 



Coarse of Study In Veterinary Science 

The new course of study in veterinary med- 
icine is designed to thoroughly qualify its 
graduates in every branch of the science, fitting 
them to enter any line of work in the broad 
field of the veterinarian. The demand for 
qualified veterinarians is constantly on the in- 
crease and is now much greater than the sup- 
ply. Men are continually being drawn from a 
good, private practice to fill vacancies in the 
army, positions as educators in our colleges, 
investigators in our experiment stations, and 



4 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



inspectors in the United States Bureau of An- 
imal Industry. Many a good position has 
gone begging for want of a man to fill it, and 
many still remain unfilled. The State of Kan- 
sas alone has need for hundreds of competent 
private practitioners. 

There is no profession in which the recent 
graduate can step into financial independence 
as quickly as in the veterinary profession. 
The prejudice against the veterinarian is dis- 
appearing very rapidly, and it is being recog- 
nized as a fact that a person can be just as 
much a gentleman and a man in the practice of 
veterinary medicine as in the human practice. 
In this day and age it is the man who makes 
the profession. In outlining the course of 
study one idea has been kept duite prominent! 
Educating the student in the duties of good 
citizenship in addition to his technical train- 
ing. The first year's studies and about half of 
the second will be the same as the general 
course of the College. In the second year will 
begin the technical work proper. Anatomy, 
including dissection, which is the fundamental 
study, will be carried throughout the. second 
and third years. Materia medica, corn p a rati ve 
physiology and histology are outlined as sec- 
ond-year studies. Medicine and surgery are 
carried throughout the last two years. Pathol- 
ogy, both general and special, pharmacology, 
obstetrics and meat inspection are also listed 
in the third and fourth years, including labor- 
atory work in special bacteriology, pathology, 
pharmacology. Clinical work is furnished in 
abundance, and the student will he required to 
do his share in all the operations presented 
throughout the course. Special lectures upon 
surgical restraint, the administration of med- 
icines, and in dentistry will be presented in con- 
nection with clinical material for the benefit of 
the students of all classes. While theory will be 
presented in detail the fact is never lost sight 
ot that this course is designed primarily as a 
practical one for Kansas conditions, and that 
the "finished product" should be a broad- 
minded citizen and a first-class veterinarian. 

F. S. SCHOEtf LEBER. 



Domestic Science Summer Course 

The second summer course in domestic science 
at K. S. A. C. was given this year. The work 
began May 28 and closed July 29. This course 
consists of two classes daily, a class in do- 
mestic science each morning and a class in do- 
mestic art each afternoon. 

Mrs. Calvin has faithfully met the class in 
cooking and has given a thorough course in the 
theoretical as well as the practical work. The 
different classes of food are studied in regular 



order. One-half of the period is given to reci- 
tation and the other half is spent in the labor- 
atory where the food is prepared for serving. 
Practical work is also given in preparing and 
serving a dinner. Each two girls must pre- 
pare and serve a four-course dinner to six 
members of the class for the sum of one dollar. 
They must select the menu and buy all the ma- 
terial that is needed. They are responsible for 
the dinner and the manner in which it is served. 
A great deal of reference work is required. 
The course is given in as condensed a form as 
practical, owing to the amount of work re- 
quired and the short time in which it is done. 

The course in domestic art began with the 
simplest work— that of making models. Lec- 
tures are given along with the practical work. 
This is followed by drafting, cutting, and mak- 
ing an underskirt and an unlined dress. The 
material for the models is furnished by the de- 
partment. For the others each student fur- 
nishes the material and makes her own gar- 
ments. 

A few of the girls are students who have been 
attending College and are either reviewing, or 
taking the work now so they may give the time 
to some other work during the College year. 
These are allowed to enter provided the limited 
number is not reached, as the course is prima- 
rily for teachers. 

The summer course at K. S. A. C. is still in 
its infancy but it has met with favor and it will 
undoubtedly increase in attendance and popu- 
larity as it becomes more fully known through- 
out the State and may it be a power in induc- 
ing the people of Kansas to realize the neces- 
sity of giving this branch of science an impor- 
tant place in the public schools of the State. 

Those in attendance are: Inez Ritner, Effle 

Seaman, Kate Alexander, Marietta Smith, 

Rose Ordnung, Doris Train, Ellen Meldrum, 

Grace Walworth, Myrtle Kahl, Ruth Cooley, 

Harriet Esdon, Cecile Allen tharp, May Harris, 

Grace Allingham and Mamie Hassebroek. 

G. A. '04. 

Alpha Beta Reunion 

The reunion of the Alpha Beta society held 
in south society hall on June 14 was an event 
very much appreciated by all those connected 
with the society in past or present years. 
It was a success in every particular. Let- 
ters were read from many alumni who could 
not be present and a telegram of greeting re- 
ceived from Mrs. Nellie (Kedzie) Jones, '76. 
An excellent program was rendered by past 
and present Alpha Betas, but space will not 
permit a review of it. Attention was called to 
the "Annual Gleaner" which is to be prepared 
from "Gleaners" gleaned. It will be published 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



in about a year. Letters were received from 
D. W. Working 1 , '88, superintendent of schools 
at Littleton, Colo., and H. M. Cottrell, '84, of 
Odebolt, Iowa. Mr. Cottrell intends soon to 
move to Elgin, 111., where he has an interest in 
the Cottrell Feed Co. 

Letters from E. A. Helmick, 'S3, and his 
wife, Lizzie (Clarke) Helmick, '84, came from 
Springfield, Mass., where, as captain in the 
tenth Infantry, he is stationed at the United 
States army recruiting station. They have 
spent nearly all of the fifteen years of their 
married life on the Western frontier, in Cuha, 
and in the Philippines. From Fort Worth, 
Tex., was sent a message from V. L. Cory, '04. 
He expects to visit T. W. Buell, '04, and H. 
R. Thatcher, '03, this summer. He is to he 
transferred from Fort Worth to McPherson, 
Kan., in the fall. R. W. Clothier, '97, sent an 
enthusiastic letter from Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Dr. L. B. Jolley, '01, of Chicago, had planned 
to be present, but it seemed that fate ruled 
against him. Below is a list of Ex-A. B.'s 
who were present at the reunion: 

Matie (Toothaker) Kimball; Ivy F. Harner, 
MB; W. W. Hutto, '91; Henrietta (Willard) 
Calvin, '86; Maria (Hopper) Getty, '80; Jen- 
nie Cottrell, '04; W. F. Kerr, member of '06 
class; Augusta Gritting, '04; J. T. Skinner, '04: 
Marian Allen, '04; Amy Allen, '04; Grace 
MeCrone, '04; Carl Thompson, '04; Anna Mon- 
roe, '04; C. H. Kyle, '03; Bessie Bourne, '02; 
Grace Bolton, '00; Josephine Finley, '00; Mel- 
via F. Avery, '99; Mary (Finley) Ridenour, 
'98; Elsie Waters, '98: F. J. Rumnold, '98: A. 
C. Havens, '96; A. E. Ridenour, '90; R. W. 
Rader, '95: Maude P. Hutto, junior in '95; O. 
H. Halstead, '95; Chas. C. Smith, '94; Clara 
F. Castle, '94; Winifred Westgate, '94; Fred 
Marlatt, '87; Lydia (Gardiner) Willard, '84; 
Hattie (Peck) Berry, '84; Phoebe Haines, '83; 
Sarah (Thackrey) Harris, second year in '79, 
Grace Meeker, student in '81, Mattie (Mails) 
Coons, '82, W. J. Gritting, '83, Hattie (Clarke) 
Gritting, student in '83. M. K. w. 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 

There are now 722 organized Young Men's 
Christian Associations in the United States and 
Canada. Over 47,000 men are members of these 
Associations and 30,000 were enrolled in Bible 
study classes during the past year. Thevalue 
of the buildings owned by the Y. M. C. A.'s 
in our colleges is $800,000, and buildings to the 
value of $307,000 are now in process of con- 
struction. 

Each year there are seven student conferences 
in different parts of the United States. Imme- 
diately after the close of the college year, the 



students or Kansas go to Lake Geneva, Wis., 
a noted summer resort, and those who are 
privileged to attend are well repaid for the 
time and money spent. There were about 500 
delegates there this summer. These men come 
from the colleges and universities of the Cen- 
tral West for ten days of work and recreation. 
The mornings are taken up with meetings of 
various kinds whose purpose is to impart the 
best methods of carrying on the Association 
activities and also to give an uplift to the 
spiritual lives of the men. The afternoons are 
devoted to out-door sports such as baseball, 
track athletics, tennis, swimming, rowing, etc. 
In the evening an hour or two is spent in work 
similar to that of the morning. 

Plans for the new Y. M. C. A. building at K. 
S. A. C. have been definitely adopted. It is 
hoped that a start can be made this fall so that 
the building will be ready for occupancy in the 
fall of 1900, Efforts are now being made to 
secure the balance of the money needed before 
work can be begun. w. w. MCL. 



Alumni Triennial Reunion 

The crowning event of Commencement week 
was the triennial reunion and banquet of the 
Alumni Association. In spite of wind and rain 
about two hundred forty alumni and their 
friends were present. The reception was held 
in the halls and class rooms of the Physical 
Science building and the banquet was served 
in the Women's Gymnasium. 

MENU 

Strawberries 

Baked Fish Cucumbers 

Brown Bread Sandwiches 



icken Croquettes Tomato Sauce 
New Potatoes Peas 
Hot Rolls Butter 

Pineapple Salad 


Carmel Ice-Cream 


Cake 


Coffee Cheese 


Crackers 



Olives Salted Nuts 

The following program was given after the 

banquet: 

....Ladies' Octette 

. Reirent J. W. Berry. '83 

..Adelle Blachly. 01 



m^auimWm See J- *>■ Rlddell. '83 

£2 Club Woman::'.::". Emma (Knostman) Huse 



Chorus • ■•■• 

Twenty-Five Years' Proirress. 

Solo 
The 

&£?«, .::::..... -Guy F. Farley, 'm 

iolo :.*::::::.:*.'.■'-'".' Roland McKee. 'oo 

There are three pleasures pure and lasting, 
and all are derived from inanimate things 
-books, pictures, and the face of nature. 



6 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




m#tt»; LrrEvtur 
Owe CviTtwtTt Hi* 
Own Otmv. •+• 

'Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan,, as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 



F. A. K'iksk. '06 Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hkim, '06 , Business Manager 

E. C. Fakkak. '07 Literary Editor 

C. A. SMITH. *07 .Local Editor 

MattiePittman. '06 Exchange Editor 

Carrol Walk kk, *07... Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery, '07 Subscription Manager 

MiSiSSftifw I" Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet, "04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen. "08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late J 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. *04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Aug. 3, 1905. 




Track athletics are not in season at present, 
but we hope that everyone will take notice that 
a special coach has been elected to direct this 
work and that an effort is being- made to secure 
meets with several other colleges and thus in- 
crease the interest and pleasure in this branch 
of athletics. 



We are not aware of the number of changes, 
nor the particulars of each, that have taken 
place in the board of instruction of the College 
but we have this to say for those that do leave, 
that we are sorry and disappointed if any 
carry away a bitter feeling toward the College 
or the student body. We hope you can 
look back and honestly say that the days spent 
with us have been among the most pleasant of 
your life. In the work that you go to upon 
leaving K. S. A. C. we wish you unbounded 
success and may your "way be one of pleasant- 
ness and all your paths be peace." 



It is hoped that the Y. M. C. A. fund will all 
be pledged before the first of November, so that 
an early start may be made upon the building. 
The plans have been definitely decided upon 
and the building should be completed and ready 
for use by the fall of 1906. K very one that has 
not contributed and every new student should 
do all in their power to bring to its finality the 
Y. M. C. A building fund. 



The Agricultural Review, published by the 
students of the College, have seen fit to place in 
this issue of our paper a full page advertise- 
ment, and your attention is called to it. The 
Review is an agricultural journal devoted to 
the different phases of agriculture. It is not a 
paper for students, but one for any one that is 
interested in the line of work which it follows. 
Talk to your fathers and mothers, students, 
and persuade them that, for their own good 
and for the good of one of the student move* 
ments, they should subscribe. 



The attention of the Herald readers is re- 
spectfully called to the advertisements running 
in its pages. These contributions represent an 
outlay of time and expense on the part of the 
advertiser and is his method of saying to you 
that he wishes to secure your trade. This 
paper is your paper, if you have a common 
interest with it, and it is no more than right 
that you should return to the people who con- 
tribute to its support, a part of their outlay by 
trading at their houses. Look over the adver- 
tisements, note the names, then call and talk 
with these men— tell them that you, too, are 
interested in the Herald, and then trade with 
them. 



Your attention is again called to a proposi- 
tion made by Miss Driver, superintendent of 
the Parkview Hospital, to the students of the 
College. She wishes to organize the students 
for mutual benefit, whereby they may, by pay- 
ing a small fee, secure to themselves hospital 
care in case of sickness during the coming 
year. Few of the College students are finan- 
cially able to pay for the expensive hospital 
treatment and must necessarily deny them- 
selves a luxury that may mean life and cer- 
tainly time and money in the end. It is surely 
the duty of every student to think of his fellow 
and at the same time insure himself against the 
possibility of disease and neglect. By paying 
a small fee into a general fund a guarantee of 
hospital care and treatment in case of disease 
could be secured to all, thus making possible 
at a nominal cost what to the individual would 
be a heavy burden. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



We must pa.v tribute to our alumni editor for 
the work she has done in preparing the mid- 
summer number of the Hkrald for the reading 
public. In the absence of the remainder of the 
staff she has filled all the editors' chairs, has 
handled the "cash," and has been, vividly ex- 
pressed, "the whole cheese." She has been 
assisted by the local editor, who is "after big- 
game" interviewing the officials and business 
men of the town for a city paper, and by sev- 
eral other students in and about Manhattan, 
If ever the Hkrald lives up to the statement 
on the first page it is in the midsummer issue, 
for surely then it is by everybody and for 
everybody. So here is a ''thank you" to 
everybody from everybody. 



K. S. A. C. is not well enough known over 
the State. Not that her work has heen insig- 
nificant, but that in the maddening rush after 
the almighty dollar we are inclined to make 
small our privileges and slight them, and make 
large opposing elements and foster them. We, 
as students, do not know or appreciate our Col- 
lege as we should, and out over the State we 
are content to let slighting remarks go without 
rebuttal. Let us each, if we are in earnest and 
wish to make ours the foremost College of its 
kind in the world, change our tactics and talk 
for our school whenever the opportunity offers, 
and let us each make an effort to turn some 
earnest, young American toward K. S. A. C. Be- 
fore we leave for school this fall let us each se- 
cure a promise of a few days' visit from our par- 
ents during the year, and also let us scatter among 
our friends and neighbors a standing invitation 
to visit a school where one day of earnest 
sight-seeing and study is a small education in 
itself. Your instructors will be glad to turn 
you loose any day to show about the school 
visitors who consider it worth the while to 
make the trip to K. S. A. C. 



If it should be the fortune of any midsummer 
Herald to fall into the hands of a prospective 
K. S. A. C. student, a greeting is hereby ten- 
dered. We, the old students, will say first to 
you, prospective students, that we consider 
ourselves members in a large family and that 
we shall be glad to welcome you at K. S. A. C. 
in September. We are busy people while here 
and we have learned that what we get out of 
our school is measured principally by what we 
put into it. We are in earnest, and ambitious 
for our College and for ourselves, and we can 
honestly say that the greatest measure of good 
comes to us when we throw ourselves heartily 
into our school work and into the student 
movements. If you come to us, the change 



will be a radical one and many of your present 
views will be dropped and others taken in their 
stead. Be thoughtful of a common interest 
and do all you can for the common welfare. 
In the College you will find the following stu- 
dent organizations: Six literary societies, 
three clubs, three College papers, the Young 
Men's and Women's Christian Associations, 
and the Athletic Association. Besides these 
the students put on an extensive lecture course 
and hold parties and receptions in the different 
classes. Re a worker. Not all the good things 
will come from your studies, but much will 
come from your associations and the student 
doings. Take up one or several branches of 
the student work and do your utmost to further 
its interests, and the more you do the greater 
will he your capability. 



It may be of interest to many to know that 
Assistant Ahearn has been selected to coach 
the teams which will represent the College dur- 
ing the coming year. Mr. Ahearn has won a 
reputation in the east and is fully competent to 
direct our athletic efforts in football and base- 
ball. But no matter how strong the coach nor 
how hard he works, a winning team will not be 
ours until every member of it bends to his 
work as if the life of the organization depended 
upon his effort. And in a large sense it does, 
for if there is a weak spot in any athletic team. 
its opponent will find it out and profit by it. 
It is no disgrace to have lost a game, to have 
been out-played, but it is an honor to have 
played a game perfect in every detail and in 
every movement. The prospects for football 
at K. S. A. C. are very bright for this season. 
Though we cannot have an experienced team 
we can have one that plays hard and long, and 
this we will have. Many of the old players 
will be back and many of those who practiced 
occasionally last season will be out to work in 
earnest for a position on the first team. It is 
hoped that no one will pass an opportunity 
during vacation to talk for the school and at 
the same time for football. We do not believe 
that any man should go to a school solely for 
its offer of athletic training and honor, but we 
do believe that every man should do all the 
good he can in all the ways he can for his 
college. We do not claim that colleges were 
made for football, but we hold that football 
was made for colleges^ This is attested by the 
fact that no liberal-minded faculty in the 
United States has ever sought to eliminate 
from its school activities the game of football. 
That has been left for ignorant, misinformed, 
and narrow-minded men sitting in the state leg- 
islatures. As long as young men have vigor- 



8 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



cms minds and bodies they will be proud to ex- 
hibit the first in mental effort and the last in 
physical exertion, matched man against man. 
We believe in doing- nothing by halves and we 
scorn anyone that refrains from throwing his 
whole heart and soul into whatever he under- 
takes. And so we beg you, old students and 
new, not to restrain any of your young enthu- 
siasm. If you can work on any athletic team 
go out and work hard. If you cannot, go out 
and encourage others, and in doing this you 
will be doing a work not prominent in public 
view but however a mighty factor in insuring 
success for the teams. 



Time flies and soon this pleasant summer 
vacation will be over and we will gather once 
again from the sunny fields of Kansas to our 
College on the hill: Many, of course, can 
gather only in spirit but we are certain that 
your minds will turn often during the coming 
year to the haunts and associations of K. S. 
A. C, and we hope that the thoughts of the 
laborers there will make you stronger in the 
work you have chosen to do. To all, the Her- 
ald sends greetings and best wishes and asks 
only that you look with favor through its 
pages. We hope that this vacation has been 
to you both pleasant and profitable in the past 
and that the remaining weeks will contain for 
you a double measure of the same. Then when 
the beginning of another year appears may you 
enter into its activities stronger for the respite 
and more determined with the weight of 
another year upon your shoulders and bearing 
the cognomen of the class so lately despised 
openly but secretly respected and honored. To 
those who take up work removed from K, S. A. 
C. we have only words of encouragement. Wo 
will think of you often and send after you our 
best wishes. We know that you are stronger 
for having spent four years in College and that 
consequently your work will be more quickly 
and easily done. When you step out of Col- 
lege you only step into the larger school of 
life and you should keep your wits about you. 
It is the man or woman that does the thinking 
and the hard work that will be called to be 
master among men. May the richest favors be 
showered upon you and may the thoughts of 
your Alma Mater and the opening of the school 
year ever put an added zest into your work and 
increase your delight in it. 



i* 



The benefit we receive must be rendered 
again, life for life, cent for cent, deed for deed, 
to somebody. Beware of too much good stay- 
ing 1 in your hand. It will fast corrupt. Pay 
it away in some sort.— Emerson. 



We do not like to be too critical on our last 
catalogue number, but from the views of the 
blacksmith shop, the dairy laboratory, and the 
poultry judging class, one would be lead to 
believe that advancement was a thing of the 
past. The views mentioned were in proper 
place four or five years ago, but what the K. 
S. A. C. student of to-day wants to see in his 
catalogue is the way they are arranged now. 
The arrangement and equipment now far sur- 
pass that of four or five years ago, and why 
not show it to the public in our annual cata- 
logue. It will be a help in bringing new stu- 
dents to the institution. 



Athletic News 

Mr. Meliek will coach the track team and 
basket-ball teams. 

The football schedule opens with Friend's 
University, here, October 7. 

The equipment for the team will be ordered 
in time to have all that is needed on hand by 
the time College opens. 

Mr. A hear n has been selected to coach the 
football team this fall and will look after the 
baseball team next spring. 

An effort will be made to secure a place for 
basket-ball, and from past records nothing 
will be wanting in way of support and material 
for a good team. 

Every honest effort will be made this year to 
bring out a winning team. We believe that 
Coach Ahearn will be able to supply the little 
that has been needed in the past to produce a 
team equal to any in the State. 

The schedule for the home grounds calls for 
six games. Come back with the price of a sea- 
son ticket, and don't miss any of these games. 
You'll need the fresh air and sunshine and the 
rooting will do your lungs good and help the 
team win. 

It will be a special effort to build up a strong 
second team this year and some good games 
are in sight for this team. The second team 
will make the trip this year to Normal, 
November 30, Normal's first team playing here 
on that date. 

The following old players will be on the grid- 
iron this fall: Munsel, Cunningham, Walker, 
Brown, Shearer, Scholz, Mallon, Cooley, 
Thurston, Coxen, Montgomery, and Nystrom. 
Coach Ahearn is in correspondence with Til ley, 
Seng, and several others. It is not known 
whether Hess and Carlson will be back with 
the team or not. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



9 




Milo Hastings is poultry man. 

The Botanical help is Raymond Ban*. 

The farmers are J. E. Cooley, V. E. Bates, 
and C. E. Greenough. 

Florence Sweet is spending the summer with 
her aunt in Kansas City. 

Professor Dickens has some fabulous fish 
stories to tell about Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Paul left June 27 for 
their new home in Las Cms, Mexico. 

Professor Valley and family are spending 
the summer at their old home in Chicago. 

Ethel Alexander, who spent the winter teach- 
ing at Selma, Iowa, is at home for the sum- 
mer. 

Wren Paine is working for the bridge and 
building department of the Union Pacific this 
summer. 

The churches in town are holding union 
services Sunday evenings so the ministers may 
have a rest. 

Professor Freeman, of the Botanical De- 
partment, is spending the summer at his home 
in Alabama. 

The crew of butter-makers is A. B. Nystrom 
(chief), and J. M. Garrity and G. M. Caldwell 
churn-washers. 

Miss Weeks is taking speeial work in draw- 
ing at the summer school of the state university, 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

The mechanical work is turned out by E. A. 
Wright, Jesse Foster, Donald Ross, Scott 
Wilson and Carle Millard. 

The "Hort. Squad" includes S. V. Smith, 
Guy Yerkes, M. M. Justin, C. S. Jones, Horace 
Bixby, E. W. Thurston, and G. A. Porter. 

Messrs. O. L. and R. V. Coleman, former 
Ws, but now of K. U., are spending their va- 
cation at home upon the farm near Oneida, 
Kan. 

Henry Spuhler, of the senior class, is help- 
ing Manhattan people draw up ideal house 
plans this summer. His office is in the city 
library. 

Nat Purcell is working for the Common- 
wealth Power and Light Co., of Chicago He 
will continue his studies at Armour Institute 
this winter. 

The heat and power line-up is as follows: E. 
L. Shattuck, Grover Kahl, P. E. Marshall, M 
U Parsons, W. W. Hole, J. W. Munson, and 
Ed. Young. 



Miss Florence Barger, a former student, and 
Mr. Joseph Brant, of Lindsborg, were married 
at the home of the bride in Smith Center, Wed- 
nesday, June 28. 

Miss Demraing, stenographer in the veteri- 
nary office, and Miss Butter field, college book- 
keeper, spent their vacation in Denver and 
Colorado Springs. 

C. I. Weaver is digging knowledge out of 
Armour Institute in Chicago. Between times 
he is looking out for the "(Hi class book and 
rustling nobby ideas. 

The Dairy Department does a big business 
at noon dealing out bottles of milk to the va- 
rious students working around College. A bot- 
tle right off of ice goes pretty good these warm 
days. 

Harry Amos is working with Ex-Assistant 
Wheeler on the Doctor Perkins' farm at Har- 
lem, Mo. , near Kansas City. One of his duties 
is to care for a kennel of thirty Scotch collie 
dogs. 

It looks pretty good to see Mr. Lewis around 
College again. * He enjoyed a month's camp in 
the mountains of Arkansas. Mr. Orndorf and 
Mr. Matherl y kept things rounded up at College 
while he was gone. 

Carl Wheeler is tilling the soil at Bridge- 
port, Kan., and will not finish his College 
course. However, he expeets to return to K. 
S. A. C. occasionally for the sake of old ac- 
quaintances and associations. 

J. R. Coxen, reporter for the Herald, is 
"grafting" in Jewell county. He likes the 
work fairly well, being a natural grafter, but 
gets "darned" lonely occasionally. He will be 
glad when things "get busy" at College again. 

Joseph P. Montgomery is in training for the 
football squad. He is at present pitching 
sheaves at Bennington, Kan., but on rainy 
days he sells views in preparation for his work 
next fall as subscription solicitor for the Her- 
ald. 

Bunn Thurston is strengthening his pocket- 
hook and also the physical man in the harvest 
fields aboUt Osborne preparatory to "whooping 
up things in general" at K. S. A. C. in the 
fall. He will be out with the football squad to 
try for an end or half. 

The baseball game on the Fourth between 
Ft. Riley and Manhattan ended in a victory 
for Ft. Riley bv the score of 5 to 2. Carl Mal- 
lon and "Sol. "'Cunningham, of this year's Col- 
lege team, played with Manhattan. Grover 
Kahl was judge of the balls and strikes. 

Miss Ethel Weaver and Mr. Frederick M. 
Yonkman were married by Rev. W. C. Hanson 
at the Weaver home on Humboldt street, June 
twenty-first. The young couple are at home to 
their many friends in Milwaukee, Wis., where 
Mr. Yonkman is a successful business man. 

Thursday evening, July 13, a merry crowd 
of young ladies gathered at the home of Misses 
Lois and Kate Sitterly and surprised them. 
Flinch was the game of the evening. Refresh- 
ments were served at a late hour. Both young 
ladies are former students, but expect to teach 
in Norton county this year. 



10 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Luther Solt is working in the oil fields. 

The Mercury still has its weekly spasms. 

Bring 1 some new students with you this fall! 

Bring" some football players back with you! 

Students, be sure to eat Gribble's Hunger 
Cure. 

He who resigned and ran away will live to 
sing another lay. 

Wren Thurston spent the week of July Fourth 
in Topeka and Auburn. 

A large crop of grapes is almost assured in 
the Experimental vineyard. 

O. O. Morrison expects to work in Knost- 
man's clothing store next year. 

Professor Dickens is spending his vacation 
with relatives at St. Francis, Min, 

Those working for the Mechanical Depart- 
ment get Saturday afternoon off on full pay. 

The foundry made a run last week. The pro- 
duct was material for the new drawing tables. 

Miss Huntress took her month's vacation in 
June and July. Miss Davis gets two weeks off 
in August. 

Raymond Harrison came down from Jewell 
and visited friends in Manhattan during the 
first week of July. 

Orendorf and Matherly were the whole thing 
on the janitor force until the return of Mr. 
Lewis, on July 18. 

The "Hort. boys" have been on the "rock 
pile" nearly two weeks now. Don't know when 
their time will be up. 

Professor Brink and Reverend Atkinson 
have a ten-acre patch of sweet potatoes which 
they are tending by themselves. 

The librarians have been busy preparing 
magazines, etc., for the bindery, and placing 
those that have been returned from the bindery. 

The Heat & Power Department has repaired 
the break in the tunnel just back of the "Gym," 
which was the result of too much wet weather. 

Elizabeth Sweet, Curtis Smith and Roy Gas- 
ton are the resident midsummer staff, "in the 
absence of Coxen, the latter had to play the 
devil. 

The name of Walter Ballard appears on the 
Hort. pay-roll and his ghost is seen on Lara- 
mie street quite frequently during the "we sma' 
hours." 

Wm. Anderson, assistant in physics, is so- 
journing in Europe, visiting relatives in Nor- 
way and Sweden. He will return about Sep- 
tember 1. 

Prof. Oscar Erf, of the Animal Husbandry 
Department, and Miss Louise Ashton, of Mon- 
roeville, Ohio, were married at the home of the 
bride on June 28. 

Professor Mathewson, assisted by Raymond 
Brink, has spent most of the summer 'taking 
care of the Chemistry Department's supplies 
for next year. Eight firms put in bids to fur- 
nish these supplies. 



Hobson is married, but his substitute was 
walking by the Auditorium with a young lady 
recently. They paused for hostilities in front 
of the main entrance. 

One of the "Hort." cats wandered over to the 
D. S. recently and ate some of the kisses that 
the girls had made. It goes without saying 
that the cat wanders no more. 

Professor Ahearn is to be congratulated on 
the results he has attained with the dowers on 
the campus. Their size, beauty, and arrange- 
ment has never been surpassed. 

The prospects for Hort. cider are poor. The 
department does not have the Spohr farm this 
year and the apples in the College orchard are 
few and far between. Strange. 

Mr. Taylor, of the Salina Business College, 
has been employed by the Animal Husbandry 
Department as stenographer to fill the place 
left vacant by Miss Hetterstedt. 

The Mechanical Department is making ad- 
justable drawing tables for the drafting room 
over the carpenter shop. They will be a de- 
cided improvement over the old ones. 

Ho ff bines and Garrity are running the 
creamery this summer. Melick frequently 
washes bottles, etc., for them. Having wet feet 
so much of the time Garrity is wearing larger 
shoes. He wears number elevens now, with a 
month and a half lor further growth. 

The Mechanical Department furnished com- 
pressed air to the threshing machine while they 
were threshing the many varieties of wheat and 
other small grains for the Farm Department. 
The air was conveyed from the compressor to 
the machine through a hose. 

T. O. Hassman, Earle Cole and Lynn Harris 
passed through Manhattan June 22. with the 
company of IT. S. engineers to which they be- 
long, on their way to San Francisco. They 
embarked on the transport Logan June 21* for 
Manila. They celebrated the glorious Fourth 
in Honolulu. 

The boiler room is undergoing a thorough 
overhauling this summer. Two boilers have 
been taken out, three old ones will be trans- 
planted, and two large, new ones will be placed 
in commission; besides, another large brick 
smokestack will be erected soon. Mechanical 
stokers are a possibility with this general 
cleaning up. 

It is said that one of the recently married 
assistants, when sent down town on his first 
shopping expedition, stopped a vegetable wa- 
gon and, not wishing to appear stingy, ordered 
seventy-five cents worth of string beans sent to 
the house. He afterwards learned that this was 
enough to feed seventy-five people. He is now 
accused of trying to string his wife. 

A minature complete flour mill has been 
added to the equipment of the Experiment Sta- 
tion. Those in charge are now able to make 
standard grades of flour from small samples of 
wheat raised by the Farm Department or 
others. In this manner the food value of var- 
ious kinds of wheat is determined. The ma- 
chine was made to order by the Allis-Chalmers 
Company, of Milwaukee, and cost $275. It re- 
quires from three to five horse-power to run it. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



11 



Sol. Cunningham is "hoppin' clods for dad," 

Cribble's Bread; made to eat; hard to heat. 

Phone 1HK for CJribhle's bread, pies, and 
cakes. 

Roy Hamaker is employed in the city ice 
plant. 

"Laurence Brink is spending the summer at 
home. 

July fourth Captain Shaffer went toTopeka 
to-day. 

Captain Shaffer spent July 1(1, 17 and 18 in 
Topeka. 

Captain Shaffer spent a few days last week 
in Topeka. 

Shattuck is doing time in the boiler-room at 
the College. 

K. A. Wright is working for a bridge com- 
pany in Topeka. 

Professor Krf and his bride are now at home 
at the Gilette House. 

Jewel Spohr is working in the register of 
deed's ottiee this summer. 

Miss Nell Hughes, of Topeka, visited with 
Miss Clare Cave the last week in July. 

Curtis Smith is leading a strenuous life this 
summer as reporter for the NntionaUat. 

Miss Georgia West and Miss Grace Brown 

are spending the summer in old Mexico. 

Roy Hamaker expects to make a visit to his 
old home in Terra Haute, tad., this summer. 

Crete Spencer did Miss Demmings's work at 
the Vet, office while she was away on her vaca- 
tion. 

Miss Irene Taylor entertained a number of 
College girls with a house party, at her pretty 
country home near Chapman, Kan., July 17 to 
24. 

Professor Ever spent the month of July at 
the General Electric Company, Schenectady. 
New York. He was working in the machine- 
testing room. 

p A Kiene was in Manhattan the first of 
last week and did a good job of rustling ads. 
for the HERAU). He also scraped up some news 
at the same time. 

Eva Rickman, junior, and C. V. Gilbert, 
freshman, students last winter, were married 
at the home of the groom's sister in Philhps- 
burg, Sunday, July 9. 

Bernice Deaver and Ella Hathaway, first 
years last year, expect to attend the Jewel 
county institute and teach next winter. Both 
will be in College for the spring term. 

Some new Manhattan improvements are: A 
new steam laundry, new Nothing store, Lmon 
National Bank building, cement curbing on 
Leavenworth street, and seven automobiles. 

Mrs Calvin will speak before the State 
Horticultural Society at Topeka this week and 
on August 12 will go to Clay Center to give a 
demonstration lecture at the chautauqua held 
there. 



W. W. Buckley stopped in Manhattan, July 
21 to 23. He was on his way to Washington, 
D. C, where he will report for duty. He will 
probably be assigned to the officers' school at 
Annapolis. 

Emmet Richardson, the automobile man, is 
running a threshing machine near ins home at 
Glen Elder, Mitchell county. M. Klsas is 
tending separator for him. Both expect to he 
hack in College next fall. 

The local editor received a letter recently 
from J. R. ('oxen. He and W. T. McCall are 
working for the Success Publi slung Company, 
in Jewell county. He has kept track of several 
K. S. A. C. people and helped us out with sev- 
eral notes about them. 

The Herald wishes to express its aprpeci- 
ation of the help received from the Printing 
Department in preparing the summer issue. 
Not that the Printing Department people are 
any less courteous at other times, but in the ab- 
sence of the regular staff the supply editor has 
depended on the people of the Printing Depart- 
ment for most (if the editorial knowledge used. 

We, the class of l!M>r>, hereby' extend our 
heartfelt sympathies to Mr. W. W. Brant and 
the other members of the family of the late de- 
ceased, Joseph Brant, of Wichita. 

Jtemlved. That a copy of these resolutions he 
printed in the STUDENTS' HERALD, the Jay- 
hawkeu and the home paper. Committee. 

My Prayer 

Through Time's iontr sweep. 
To work, or waft. 
To sew or re up: 

With consciousness 
That wood will trrow 
Of all not less. 

Morn's wine, ninht'slees, 
What e'er betide. 
Fair wind, foul seas. 

The strength to bear. 
To love and serve. 
This is my prayer. 

The dreams to do, 
To know, to be. 
At last come true. 

And in the end. 
Not soundless sleep. 
But growth ye lend. 

— Made Tnothaktr Kimball, 'H4. 



The Border Queen Band 

Our new band which was recently organized 
is doing splendidly in practice and is now 
able to play several pieces in a creditable 
manner. There is no question but that it has 
the finest set of band instruments in the south- 
west, bar none, and under the splendid leader- 
ship of Mr. A. D. McCampbell, will soon be 
able to cope with any of the hands in this part 
of the country.— Co nutndw {Indian IernUny) 
Republic. 

Mr. McCampbell's friends will be glad to 
hear of his success. Besides conducting the 
band, he has a class of thirty pupils on the 
mandolin and guitar. He also leads the choir 
at the Methodist church. He likes the^ Southern 
people and enjoys his work but will be back in 
College again this fall. 



12 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Clara Pancake, '03, is spending the summer 
in Topeka. 

Helen (Knostman) Pratt, '01, is the mother of 
a little son since June twenty fifth. 

H. V. Harlan is still taking advanced work 
along the line for which he is noted. 

Helen Monsch, '04, is spending the summer 
with her sister, Mrs. Professor Roherts, 

"Corporal" Edgerton, '04, of West Point, 
enjoyed a week's visit from his parents this 
summer. 

Ada Rice, '95, and Tna Holrovd, '07, in- 
structors in English at K. 8. A. C., are attend- 
ing the Boston Harvard summer school. 

Abby Marlatt, '88, who is a teacher of house- 
hold economics at the Province, R. L, high 
school, is visiting her father on College Hill 
this summer. 

Gertrude (Lyman) Hall, '97, is visiting her 
parents in Manhattan. She intends to soon 
join her husband in Montana, and from there 
they will take a trip along the Pacific coast. 

C. P. Hartley, '92, who is in the U. S. Bu- 
reau of Plant Industry, and Miss Anna G. 
Brigham, were married at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Marcus M. Cass, Jr., at Watkins, N. 
Y., July 25. 

Kirk. P. Mason, '04, football manager in '03 
and baseball manager in '04, is studying med- 
icine with his father, at Cawker ( 'ity. Kirk, has 
been attending the Kansas Medical College 
but he has not forgotten K. S. A. C. 

Florence Ritchie, '04, is at present enjoying 
her work very much as teacher of domestic 
science in the Girls' Industrial School at Be- 
loit. (C. S. Dearborn, 1 04, assistant in me- 
chanical engineering at K. S, A. C., is spend- 
ing his vacation at Beloit). 

Mary O' Daniel, '04, and John M. Scott, 
senior in '03, were married at the O' Daniel 
home in Manhattan, on June twenty-eighth 
Grace Allingham, '04, attended them as maid 
of honor. Mr, Scott is assistant professor of 
agriculture at the New Mexico Agricultural 
College. 

Misses Christine and Henrietta Hofer are 
enjoying a pleasure trip through the eastern 
cities. They will visit Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington and New York, stopping for a 
fewdays in each place and returningto Narrows- 
burg, N. Y., where they will spend the remain- 
der of the summer. 

Letter from Louis B. Bender, '04, July tenth: 
'Enclosed find the necessary dollar to furnish 
me with the Herald for the coming vear I 
was very agreeably surprised a few days aeo 
by the arrival of Hess and Wolf, 'OS's As a 
result we three may now be found at 550 W 
Monroe St., Chicago. K. S. A. C. is now rep- 
resented here at the Western Electric Co., bv 
Reed, '03. Hess, 'U<5, Wolf, '05, and myself 
which may account in some degree for the 
company s enormous increase in business and 
tneir efficient manner of disposing of it (?) 



Delia Droll inger, '02, was married June 
twenty-eighth to Will Glunt, of Garrison. Mr. 
Glunt is a graduate of Baker University and is 
engaged in the mercantile business in Garrison. 
The wedding supper was served by Kate Rob- 
ertson and Eva Burtner, both '05, and Rose 
Thompson, friends of the bride. 

A card written June 28 from Eldorado, 
Kan., tells us that A. N. FT. Beeman and F. E. 
Balmer, both '05, took dinner with C. F. Smith, 
'02, and Charlotte (Berkey) Smith, '00, the 
Sunday before. "Prof." Smith is assistant 
principal, and teacher of phvsics and mathe- 
matics at the Central High School of Eldorado. 

Geo. L. Christen sen, "94, instructor in me- 
chanical engineering in the Michigan College 
of Mines, read a paper on "The Teaching of 
the Properties of Materials as a Class-Room 
Course," before the joint meeting of the Soci- 
ety for the Promotion of Engineering Educa- 
tion and the American Society for Testing 
Materials, at Atlantic City, N. Jr., on June 2». 

The girls in town this summer have organ- 
ized an alumni basket-ball team. They play 
in the city park every Mondav evening," (when 
it doesn't rain). The members of the team are: 
(J race Allingham, Mamie Hassebroek, Anna 
O* Daniel, Clara Spilman. Estella Fearon, Jen- 
nie Ridenour, Alice Ross, Mary Davis, Ger- 
trude Rhodes. Elizabeth Sweet. Katberine 
Winter and any others who happen t-> feel in- 
clined to play. 

PRIMARY CLASS 

Al. Cassell and "Rob" are playing bull with 
the Lincoln Center team this summer. 

Lathrop Fielding has recently accepted a po- 
sition with the Link Belt Co., Chicago. 

Charley Blachly has a good electrical job 
with the Santa Fe, with headquarters at To- 
peka. 

Bert Thompson left last Thursday for Eti- 
wanda, CaL, where he has a position on a 
fruit farm. 

Mamie Cunningham and Jessie Sweet are 
attending the Cloud county normal institute at 
Concordia. 

W. W. Stanfield is carrying on extended ex- 
periments with bacteria of leguminous plants 
for the Farm Department. 

W. H. Goodwin has been working in K. S 
A. C. at the carpenter trade. He will take 
post-graduate work in entomology the fall and 
winter terms. 

Mary Strite, Gertrude Nicholson, Helen Bot- 
tomly and Margaret Cole attended the RUev 
county teachers' institute and secured nermis- 
sion to teach this winter. 

F. L. Courter is farming on his father's farm, 
near Downs, Osborne county. John Calvin is 
helping him and working up muscle so as to be 
able to support shoulder-straps next fall. 

Harry Hess and George Wolf are with the 
Western Electric Co., Chicago. A. B. Carna- 
nan and A. W. Barnard are doing mechanical 
engineering work for the same company at 
Lynn, Mass. ■ J 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



13 



Siuflenis Co-operative Boarfling M 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any clnb in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the 
Club. Engage your board early by writing to 

H. H. CON WELL, North Topeka, Kan. 



K. F. D. No. 5. 



Miss Josephine Kdwards is at home, near 
Emporia, engaged in furnishing entertainment 
for the family. Between times she goes ho at 
riding in the moonlight on the river. The 
statement was not made but we presume that 
Shuler is making a gasoline engine of himself. 

ITla Dow and Lena Finley left for Cawker 
City, Wednesday, where Miss Dow will give a 
doiiionstrated lecture on domestic science he- 
fore the Mitchell comity Chautauqua each day 
of next week. M iss Dow expects to study domes- 
tic science at Framingham (Mass.) Normal, this 
winter. 

Announcement has been received here of the 
wedding of Inez Wheeler, 'OS, and J. Minton 
Westgate, *07, at the home of the bride's sister, 
in Sacramento. C*1 M July 20. Mr. Westgate s 
work as assistant in the Department of Agri- 
culture keeps him in Oregon, where they will 
travel until September 1, after which time they 
will be at home in Washington, D. U, lne 
Hbkald extendi congratulations. 



Modern Hiawatha 



Then the valiant Hiawatha 
Killed the noble Mujukowis; 
Of the skin he made him mittens: 
Made them with the skin side outside, 
Made them with the fur side inside. 
He to get the warm side outside, 
Put the cold side, skin side, inside; 
He to get the cold side inside, 
Put the warm side, fur side, outside; 
That's why he placed the skin side inside, 
Whv lie placed the fur side outside, 
Wh'v he turned them inside outside. Ax. 



Egg Tests 

The Experiment Station is conducting one of 
the most extensive tests with eggs that has ever 
been made. Kvery t^gg laid by twenty hens for 
six weeks will be subjected to a complete anal- 
ysis. The hens are taking part in the egg- lay- 
ing contest. A separate record is kept of each 
hen's eggs and of each egg itself. The eggs 
art 1 first measured for length and width, and 
then the breaking point or resistance of the 
shell is found. The eggs are then boiled, after 
which the whites and yolks are separated and 
a careful study made of the amount of fats, 
ash, albumen, etc., that each contains. The 
Station expects to treat about iMH> eggs in this 
manner. Profes sin* Shaw is assisted by Misses 
Hole and Worden. The results will be pub- 
lished in hulletin form in the fall. (i. 



The following is taken from an editorial in 
one of our exchanges and contains a good deal 
of truth: "Class spirit is the barometer of 
college spirit. When class enthusiasm is high, 
college spirit is equally so. In spite of all that 
is said of the narrowness of such a spirit, it is 
nevertheless a valuable asset to the life of any 
school, for it is an easy matter to convert the 
enthusiasm that makes a man support his class 
into enthusiasm that will make him stand back 
of his college in all its enterprises." 

Mamma. "Fighting again, Willie? Didn't 
I tell you to stop and count one hundred when- 
ever you were angry?" 

Willie.— "But itj did"'* 1 do an * v tf ood > ma - 
Look what the Jones doy did while 1 counted!" 
—Harper** Ifewor. 




Varnfys Bookstore 

HEADQUARTERS FOR COLLEGE BOOKS 4 SUPPLIES 

™*ool». Dr„i», Seta, »„*., ££*, «^%JHS£ 

MNmnfMi 3,1 POYNTZ AVE. 






14 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



$2.25 POARD 



;AT* 



GRAHAM HOUSE 

Best board In town for the money. 
Furnished rooms at the same place. 
All modern conveniences. For ladies 
and gentlemen. First house south of 
College. 



Write or See 



J. M. GARRITY. 




anos 



HIGH- 
CLASS 
PHOTOS 



tub Bioe Valley manufacturing Co. 

i — ■ Manufacturers of_ — . 1 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators, 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves. Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc I'lione 6. 

MANHATTAN, KAN. 706 N . TH I R D STREET. 




Iz Bros. Pleat market. 

HEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



F. B. ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE and RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



211* Foyntz Ave., 



Manhattan Kan. 



DOUGHERTY BROS 

... THE BARBERS . . . 

On Third street, in Union National 

Bank Building 

Porcelain bath tabu, tine line cigars and toilet articles 



KING'S 



HOME-MADE CANDIES 

FOUNTAIN DRINKS 

ICE CREAM 

"We Lead; Others Follow." 

KING'S 



WESTERN POULTRY REVIEW 

Subscription Price, 12c a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printinff 
Review Printing Co. Manhattan, Kan. 

(Over Union National Hank). 



THE 



DODGE BOARDING CLUB 

BOARD AND ROOMS 

ONE BLOCK EAST OF MAIN ENTRANCE 
Mrs. S. V Dodge - 1 1 !2« Vattier St. 



SEEDS That 



Grow 



Elevator on V. R. I. Jt V, fty. 



Geo. T. Fielding & Sons 

Offlre ttlt.tr* X. S frond St. 



THE MIDLAND HOME 

BOARD AND ROOMS 

Rates Reasonable. 1J04 Moro Street. 

Address or see ""^^^ 

C. L. EvaiiM, - Manhattan, Kan. 



PROFESSIONAL. 

Res, Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave NO 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office over Lonnck's office Phone 307 



DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST 

34 years of continuous practice should be convincing 
for highest skill and perfection. 



DR. M. J. McKEE, DENTIST 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building 327 
Poyntz. Over Crass' Grocery. Phones: Office rffl; Res. 68 



. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



15 



WOLFS 

COTTdQE STUDIO 



THE PLACE TO GET 
PHOTOGRAPHS 

Order a general view of the Col- 
lege. - - 25c post paid 



J W BELL. 

HACK&BAGGAGE 



PHONE 59. 



SODA WATER 

at 

THE CORNER DRUG STORES 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and Gen- 
eral Seasonabl e Goods 



Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves Cleaned and 
Repaired at 

ENGEL. BROS. 



Q N. HIGINBOTHAM 



Dealer In 



FLOUR, GRAIN AND WOOD, AND HARD 
AND SOFT COAL. Telephone 55. 



I Q . A. SHE LDEN 



JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Allingham & Beattie 



DEALERS IN 



Freah and Salt Meat*, and Butterine 
Special Prices to College €lnh» 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You dun't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always In demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y.. Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARKER WHOP AND BATH ROOMS 



302 Poynu 



SIX BATHS #1.00 

P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop 



For Fine Work and Prompt Delivery 

Hanhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Phone 157 

Wait for the Wagons 



BOYS! 



For 

Ice-Cream 
and 

Sodas 



Go to. 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L. W.TURNER 



Livery, Feed and Boarding Stable. 
113 Poyntz Ave. - - Pnone 53 



Goto 



M. L HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed cutlery . . 

Razors, Knives, Scissors. We 
offer you only the best — ==^ 

W. CQ. Stingley & Co. 



16 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






I 



WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 



I 



ROBERTS &. OTTOWA 

MANHATTAN, KAN. 

MEN'S AND BOYS' SHOES, HATS, AND FURNISHINGS 



I 



WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 



i 



If FRUIT BOOK 

►*"" 41 pages 9x 12 inches; 22 colored plates showing In natural 

colors 21G varieties of Frui t, with concise description, Including season 

or ripening of earn; 64 half-tono views of Nurseries, Orchards Psirkinz 

' Honses.eie Send 50 e ts. and we will send the bookpost-paid, and Rebate Ticket 

permitting return of book by mall within 60 days anowe refund 50 ct™ Or, mail 

within 1 year, Rcbato Ticket with $12 order for nursery stock and we credit SI 00 

in part payment on order and you keef the book free, WE PAY THE FREIGHT 

WF PAY fAVfl wpflkl yft"d want more homo and travtl'ng sales men. OUTFIT 

W £i r A I \jJ\On fkke.-STARX BRO'S, Louisiana, Aio., Atlantic, Iowa, FaycttevWe, Ark. 




Bi lger's Hack 

and Baggage Line 



It 

Cab meets all trains 
day and night. Will 
call any place in town 
for passengers 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in 
the city. Suitable for 
class parties, etc. 
Charges moderate. 

SI 



PHONE 226 



WERE AFTER YOU 



W 



K are now making 
UNIFORMS 
in our own tailor shops. 
We have added a better 
grade. The only place 
wbere uniforms are made 
in Manhattan. We make 
and sell more uniforms 
than any other firm in 
town; also show the 
greatest stock of clothing 
and shoes. Three tailors 
and a shoemaker at your 
service. * £ i at i 



E. L. Knostman 



TUb Herald, II; a real, live colleoe wbbKIu, $1 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



17 



frj»l»^»»»»»tt»*»tttttt»**tt**tt**! 



"t%t <Dfo QMiaBfe" 




1 

y 

^A We make our own 

* 



(Wtanflattan Canby ^itc^en 



5 



Canbk0 

Bent Chocolates 



jgjj Best Pan Candies 
Jfl \Usi Cream CaiuHes 




All kiiMls of 



3ce Cttam 



Brick, and all * 
Fruits ami Flavors 
Made to Order rrlce " KlBl " 



FOUNTAIN j| 

Everything up-to-date in the drink line. Finest ice-cream so.las. * 



?s»s»«^«s«^s«««««««???^??^^ 



I 




« 

No effort or expense has E» spared ^SSSX^-^! * 



g ag^^ ggggg SE™*? a re included as follows 



1 

i 
i 1 



LECTURERS 



Ex-Gov. La Follet, of 

Wisconsin, 

Willett. 

Edward Bok (editor of 

Ladies' Home Journal). 

Wickershara, 



MUSIC 



Simmons- J ackon Con- 
oert Company. 

Cleveland Ladies* Or- 
chestra. 

Chicago Glee Club. 



NOVELTY 



Kellogg, the Bird 

Man. 
Parlatt, Crayon 

Artist. 




g 



1 $2 RESERVED SEASON TICKETS ONLY $2 g 



18 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



STUDENTS CO-OP BOOKSTORE 



TEXTBOOKS 



Drawing t Instruments, drawing Paper, Pens, Pencils, Tablets, Note-Books, 
Writing Paper. AH College supplies. Second-hand Books bought and sold! 

ifl£HTERMHN'S IDEHL F0UNTHIN PEN 



AT 

►2: 

POYNTZ 
AVE. 

is 

THE 

EYE 

AND 

EAR 






7/ 



/ 



X 



INFIRMARY 



//'iTiVx^ 



k 



At this infirmary all kinds of Eye Dis- 
eases, surgical or otherwise, are treated 
m the ia^est aad" most scientific manner. 

rately Sited with glasses. Mo better work can £ A^tS^^^^Lgig ^lg^ gf* tbat have been accu- 
se made for each case arter the examination; and are made ? to suit tni v^'^h^H 2 Cbi «»*°- QlaKsen 
face. Where the eyes are concerned It pays to h»ve thl beat * *""* t0 look ,U8t ri «f ht oa tbe 



S. D. ROSS, M.D. 

mnon ooo uunn i mtmm m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



19 



r V***»«*WVWWVWVWW» 




NERVOUS CASES 
TREATED. 



A lorty-two acre 
park in front of hos- 
pital. Very pleasant 
for nervous people. 
Special nurse se- 
cured for these 
cases. 



Parkview Hospital 



MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



OPEN TO THE PROFESSION OF KANSAS 
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE PUBLIC 

References by permission.— C. F. Little, M.D; J. D. 
Colt, M.D.; L. J. Lyman, M. D.; T. R. Cave, M.D.; 
E. J. Moffltt, M. D.; C. Montgomery, M. D.; W. H. 
Clarkaon, M.D.; S. D. Rosa, M.D.; J. W. Perkins, Kan- 
sas City; William D. Foster, Kansas City. Non-con- 
tagious medical and surgical cases received. 

Therapeutic advantages.- (1) The best quality of 
food served temptingly and selected as indicated for the 
case. (2) Modified forms of rest cure, carefully carried 
out." (3) Massage or the electric vibrator. (4) The 
latest and up-to-date electric machinery to meet the re- 
quired electro therapy of neurological practice. (5) 
Use preference in choosing physician. Hot air appara- 
tus for treatment of rheumatism. Rates for rheumatic 
treatment. Private appartments. Electric light and 
steam heat. Up-to-date equipment. Nurses can be fur- 
nished at your home at reasonable terms upon appli- 
cation to superintendent. 



Hospital N. Ninth and Freemont sts. 



Telephone 123 



FLORENCE A. DRIVER, 

SUPERINTENDENT AND MANAGER 



20 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




"In order to promote the liberal and practical education of the indus- 
trial classes In the several pursuits and professions 
in life," offers four*year courses in 




Main Entrance to Grounds, 



Agriculture, Domestic Science, General Science, 

Mechanical Engineering, Electrical 

Engineering, Architecture, 

Veterinary Science. 

Admission direct from country schools or eighth grade. 



It also offers to persons of mature 
age and limited means short courses in 

Agriculture, Dairying, and Domestic Science. 



A Preparatory Department is maintained for students over eighteen. 

A 200- page catalogue with 50 illustrations, containing full write-up 
of above courses and other valuable information, sent free. 

Fall Term Begins September 21, 1905. 



FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS ADDRESS 



E. R. Nicdois, President, - 



Mattaq, Kan. 



1 5 0, 00 DAIRY FARMERS 

ARE GOING TO BE ADDED TO THE BIG ARMY OF 
MORE THAN SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND USERS OF 




• I 



7^ wy* * -J "J 



25£S£25t 




CREAM SEPARATORS 



DURING THE YEAR 1905 



The all-important profit-earn- 
ing, time-saving need of the 
Cream Separator is now univer- 
sally recognized by every one. 

As between different separa- 
tors the De Laval is the original,' 
and has for twenty-five years led 
in centrifugal separation. 
Would-be imitating machines 
simply utilize the construction 
which expired De Laval patents 
leave free to them. New patents 
still protect modern improve- 
ments. 

The St. Louis Exposition 
gave the Grand Prize (very 
highest award) to the De Laval 
Separators and three Grand and 
Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors 
and improvers, while the Grand 
Prize and Gold Medal butter ex- 
hibits were all De Laval made. 



A CATALOGUE AND ANY DESIRED PARTICU- 
LARS ARE TO BE HAD FOR THE AS KING 

ffi DE LAVAL SEPARATOR GO. 



Randolph and Canal St*. 
Chicago 



Nettf York 




-. 






i, ■ 

■ 



JT 



I I 



'•■. 



1 



i f 




.IR^-.^^.^R^S>.^LS.^&.S^LfR.S.S>SL^^^3L 





sell the best uni- 
forms for the 

least money. 

Confirm tote state- 
meat by aBking the 
older students. 



WE 



sell the H. S. & 
M. suits and 
overcoats* 



WE 



always have a full 
assortment of 

Shop and Dairy 
Suits. 




WE 



carry a complete 
line of Pine Fur- 
nishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, 
Fine Caps, etc. 



Our large experience with student trade during many years 
enables us to meet their wants exactly in the way of 



CLOTHING 



312 POYNTZ AVE. 
MA NH ATTA N 



«Sli**«***XX«SW^ 






i ~> 



^M 



_ 



- 



1~ 



i 



%hc Students' Herald 



i 



"■»' 



i 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College x x 





•i 



i 



/ . 



*• s 



i 

i 



New Student Number 
1905 



i 




I 






I 









j^B 



.'•'■.'WAflJMp 



WW, ...Jin. I 



,. 



f 

■ 



\ 



t i 



Keuffel & Esser Co 

# OF NB3n£ YORK * 

708 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 

"Paraxon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



DRAWING 
PAPER8 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS («&s). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



■9* 






extend to every student a cordial invitation to risk 
our store, We have the largest, newest, up/to*iate 
stock of JEWELRY in Manhattan. X X X X 



OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 
is one of the best equipped shops in Kansas # 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT is managed by an Expert 
optician, who makes a specialty of curing 

HEADACHES, NERVOUSNESS, DIZZINESS, PAINS IN 
EYEBALLS CAUSED FROM DEFECTIVE EYESIGHT. 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED with any of these defects, we guarantee 
to cure or it costs you nothing. 



ASKREN « « ™J^c 



OPTICIAN. 










. ■•■ 



Ls 



Keuff el & Esser Co 

# OF NEW YORK » 

708 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paraxon" 
"Key Brand*' 
"Arrow Brand*' 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 

"Duplex" 

"Paragron" 

"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS («&*). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



extend to every student a cordial invitation to visit 
our stor e. We have the largest, newest, up/fcydate 
stock of JEWELRY in Manhattan, X X X X 



OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 
is one of the best equipped shops in Kansas, 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT is managed by an Expert 
optician, who makes a specialty of curing 

HEADACHES, NERVOUSNESS, DIZZINESS, PAINS IN 
EYEBALLS CAUSED FROM DEFECTIVE EYESIGHT 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED with any of these defects, we guarantee 
to cure or it costs you nothing. 



ASKREN a v* ti ^d^S 



OPTICIAN. 







THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 21 J 






* » * ■ 

■-. ■ • ■■'.■' ■ ' 

AGRICULTURAL 


* ?* 






STUDENTS 




# — ^^ ^ .^^^^— ^^^— ^ 

of the K. S. A. C. and 






FARMERS OF THE STATE 








We desire to call your attention to the 




1 

1 




Kansas Agricultural 




1 


• 

* 


Review 






A* monthly agricultural journal published at the 
Kansas State Agricultural College by agricultural 
students during the College year. This paper 
has been successfully started, is free from fi- 
nancial incumbrances and the subscription lists 






are rapidly growing. 


• 


SUBSCRIBE NOW 






While you can still take advantage of the 50-cent 
rate. This special rate will soon be withdrawn. 
Now is your opportunity to help a worthy enter- 
prise. Your name and address and fifty cents will 
secure the paper for you for one year. 




■ 




Address Kansas Agricultural Review, • Manhattan, Kan. 


* 






^H 


u 





>+■'.! 



22 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




DryGoods Room i 

Mohair Dress Goods will 
be worn another season. 
Our stock of this favor- 
ite material is better this 
year than last. Tennis 
Flannel, Shaker Flan- 
nel, Percales, Ginghams, 
Cheviots, Cotton or 
Wool Blankets, Hosiery, 
Underwear, etc. 

Ready-to-wear Room* 

In this room we carry Tailor- 
Made Suits, Skirts. Shirt 
Waists. Muslin Underskirts. 
Infants' Caps, Aprons, Neck- 
wear, etc. 



Shoe Department) 

If you will mention the 
name Krippendorf-Ditt- 
mann when you come in 
to pet Ladies' Shoes, or 
Rice & Hutch inffs when 
you want Men's Shoes, 
you will get shoes that 
will not only fit well, but 
will wear well. 

Hardware Room* 

Our stock is in fine shape 
in this department. We 
handle the celebrated 
"Keen Kutter" Goods, 



such as Razors, Knives, 
Axes, and many others. 
Stoves and Ranges, 
Builders' Hardware, 
Paints, and Glass. 

Grocery Rooms 

This is one of the most im- 
portant departments. A com- 
plete assortment Staple and 
Fancy Groceries, all Fruits 
and Vegetables in season and 
many little items used in the 
home that you will not find in 
any other grocery In town. 

Queens ware, Glassware, 
Lamps, etc. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladles' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-GoofU, Ready -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



- 



i 



PASTE IN YOUR HAT 



THE LEADER 




THE LEADER 






THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 
"Courtney's Full-Vamp Shoes are Good Enough for Me" 

SOLD ONLY BY 



I 



THE LEADER 



MOORE BROS, & CO. 



I 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students Orlnt 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Motw:L«tEveiyODeGultivat6Hi3 OtuoOeniws. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., September 21, 1905. 



Number 2 



FOOTBALL A " ee col 



The prospects for a good football team at K. 
S. A. C. this fall seem very bright. Many of 
last year's team will he hack, and despite the 
fact that freshman arc debarred from the game 
this season, we expect to turn out a strong 
team. 

Our football schedule has been arranged with 
a view to home comforts. Six of the games 
are to he played on the home grounds, and 
this fact in itself should insure a successful 
season. The fact, however, that we have a 
good team and a well -arranged schedule is not 
enough to assure the College a winning team, 
hut added to this we must have the support of 
every man, woman and child in College. 

Last fall, the St. Mary's game excepted, the 
support accorded the team by the student body 
was very poor. At St. Mary's the team showed 
what it could do when backed by the student 

body. 

Now this fall, with six important games at 
Athletic Park and with season tickets selling 
at a price within the reach of all. $1.00, every 
student in College should make it a point to 
attend these games. Just think of the oppor- 
tunity it will afford of getting rid of the sum- 
mer's pent-up enthusiasm and how much pleas- 
ure it will give when this enthusiasm is di- 
rected in the right channel. 

One thing is certain: the College may have 
a good team, a team that knows how to play 
clean, hard football, hut if the men on the 
'varsity feel that their efforts are not appre- 
ciated, their playing will be indifferent and 
they will lack that "never-say-die" spirit that 
has stopped many an opponent's rush on the 
five-yard line and turned defeat into victory. 



It is impossible for a 
person who has never 

COACH AHEARN P la >' ed the * ame Uy re " 

alize what it means to a 
player when he hears the shouts of encourage- 
ment from his fellow students. The time when 
this encouragement is needed the most is when 
the home team is being forced back on their 
own goal: then is the time when the College 
yell is most needed and appreciated by the men 
on the team. Then it is that the fellows on the 
team grit their teeth, stick their toes in the 
mud and fairly carry their opponents off their 

feet. 

Every man who has any athletic ability at 
all should be out in a suit this fall. You may 
not make the team the first day out, but the 
man that keeps hammering away day after day 
and week after week is the fellow who is doing 
his duty and helping his team and his College. 

Our first game is with Friend's I diversity 
and we must win this game, Tn order to do 
this we must have the support of the students. 
Every student should make a special effort to 
be present at the first game of the season and 
help cheer the team on to victory. 



Football Prospects 

This week we publish the pictures of Prof. J. 
O. Hamilton, general manager of the Athletic 
Association, and Mr. M. F. Ahearn, coach of 
the football team. They are the men who will 
have charge of our athletic interests for the 
next three months, and the Herald asks for 
them your most hearty assistance and support. 

The older students know Professor Hamilton 
and what he has done for athletics in our 
school, but for the benefit of the new students 
we will say a few words in regard to his work. 
In the nine months that. he has been manager 
of the association, he has accomplished a great 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



deal. He has expended both time and money 
to advance our interests. He lias l>een influen- 
tial in arousing" interest in basket-ball and 
track athletics. He has made improvements at 
the athletic park, has helped to give us a win- 
ning- baseball team, and he has so managed 
affairs that the association is now well out of 




M. F. Abeam, Football Couch. 

debt— a condition somewhat nvw at K. S. A. ('. 
All this has been done in addition to his regu- 
lar class and laboratory work in order that K. 
S. A. C. might be well represented among 1 the 
athletic teams of the State. 

Mr. Ahearn has been with us only a year, yet 
in that time he has so favorably impressed us 
with his ability as an athlete and an instructor 
that lie has been selected as coach, Mr. Ahearn 
-is a graduate of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, and while he was a student there 
he took a prominent part in all (tranches of 
college work. The men of last year's football 
team who remcml>er his work in assisting Coach 
Booth at the first of the season speak very 
highly of it. We know nothing as yet of Mr. 
Ahearn' s plans, but of one thing we are cer- 
tain: if every candidate goes out to practice 
with a determination to do his best and to fol- 
low the instructions of the coach, we will have 
the l>est team in the history of the College. 

Prospects at present seem very bright. We 
have with us four or five men who played back- 
field positions last year, as well' as seven or 
eight of last year's linemen. Several players 
of ability will enter this term, and a number of 



big- fellows who played on the class teams last 
year will l*e out. 

To the candidates for the team we wish to 
say a few words of encouragement. Don't feel 
backward and out of place, but just walk in 
and get acquainted. Report to the coach, cap- 
tain or manager and get a suit. If you don't 
know any of them, ask some player to point 
them out. We are all interested in the team, 
so of course we are interested in you. 

Professor Hamilton has announced that sea- 
son tickets, good for the six games to In* played 
on the home grounds, will l>e sold for one dol- 
lar. Admission at the gate to each of three 
games will be twenty- five cents, thirty- five cents 
to two others, and fifty cents to the jfame with 
K. S. N. Tickets will be sold to students and 
Faculty, only. Tt will be readily seen that quite 
a saving will be made, and it is hoped that at 
least six hundred tickets will be sold. 

Now just a word to the whole body of stu- 
dents. We sometimes think it strange that our 
football teams do not compare favorably with 
those from other schools. We sometimes 
blame the coach, sometimes the players, but 
very seldom do we blame ourselves, when it is 
really we who are to blame. Few of us realize 
that on the student body, fully as much as on 
the players, does the success of an athletic team 
depend. It is the encouragement which they 
receive that causes players to win games, and 
only when they receive this encou ragvment can 
they do their I test. If a player gives up his 
time to practice, works hard and does his l»est, 
can he lie blamed for feeling discouraged when 
he finds that his 
efforts are not ap- 
preciated? It is 
only human na- 
ture to recpuire 
encouragement, 
and athletes are 
human beings, 
not machines. L**t 
each of us think 
this over. Spare 
a few minutes 
each day and g-o 
out and watch the 
boys practice. 
If you see a fel- 
low make a good 

play, tell him so. It will do him good and it 
will do you good. Remember that he is work- 
ing for his College, your College, our College, 
and also remember that whatever helps the 
player and the game helps K. S. A. C. 




Prof. .1. O. Hamilton. 
General Manager. 



Football season tickets are now on sale. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



— i 



Y. M. C. A. Building 

The accompanying cut represents the build- 
tag which the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion plans to erect. The building will l>e of 
stone, with three stories and basement. The 
gymnasium will be in the form of an annex to 
the main structure, A part of the gymnasium 
will l>e excavated in order to place there the 



Association movement whose name is withheld. 
The total amount now subscribed is nearly 
$22. ."M), A strong effort will l>e made to com- 
plete the fund, it is thought that not less than 
190,000 should be put into the building. 



*■ 'Blessed be drudgery: necessity is the price- 
less spur." 




boiler and coal rooms. The basement will con- 
tain a kitchen and restaurant, locker room, 
bath room and janitors' quarters. The main 
activities of the Association will be carried on 
in the first floor. The wide entrance opens into 
a large lobby, which commands a view of the 
whole^ floor. To the left of the lobby will be 
situated the social room. Games will he kept 
here and the room is so arranged that it can 
be used as an audience room. To the right of 
the lobby there will be a small cloak room, 
offices for the general secretary, a reading 
room and Bible reference library. The second 
and third floors will contain bed-rooms, there 
being nine rooms on each floor. The gymna- 
sium is to be large enough for a running track 
and for basket-ball. 

The building movement was inaugurated a 
year ago last spring at a mass meeting of the 
students, when about 15000 was raised. Fol- 
lowing this meeting, a canvass of the whole 
student body was made. Last year also the 
student body was again canvassed, and alto- 
gether about $11.">IM) was subserilwd by the stu- 
dents. The canvass of the business men re- 
sulted in adding WX) to the fund. The Alumni 
subscribed I3B00 and the Faculty *1!HH). The 
building fund was swelled still further by a 
gift of *UXH> from an Eastern friend of the 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 

The Y. M. C. A. will {five its usual reception 
to the new men on Friday evening, September 
22. This is one of the best opportunities for 
getting acquainted that new students have. A 
pleasant time is guaranteed. 

The headquarters of the association have 
been well tilled with new students the past few 
days. "Open house" has been kept and much 
has been done to prevent the attacks of home- 
sickness from becoming too severe. 

Mr. John Dadisman, Washburn College, '05, 
will visit the College associations of the State 
this coming year. He spent Sunday with a few 
of the workers of the local association, who 
came back a few days early in order to prepare 
for the new student work. 

For several years past Mr. George Lerrigo, 
of Topeka, has been coming to Manhattan once 
a year to address the students of the College. 
Many of the old students remember Mr. Ler- 
rlso as a speaker of yreat power and as a man 
whom it is go. d to know. He will be here 
again this year, on Sunday afternoon at 3:30, 
in the Congregational church. 

It seems second nature for some people to see 
only the bright side of life. 



28 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




M»tt»; IxtCvCNT 

Our C <j iriviTt Hia 
Own Genu*. •+• 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



student enterprise are abundant opportunities 
for strenuous work, and a good work. You 
are needed in them to assure the Iwst success 
of each. Don't be backward. Hunt up the 
officers, who will he glad to know you, and en- 
roll as a member. Then, be a worker. Throw 
yourself into what is assigned you to do and 
in full measure as you render in will henefit l>e 
meted out to you. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year. 
Single copies, live cents. 



in advance. 



P. A. KfKNK, Oft Editor-tn-chtef 

H. R. Hkim, '06 Business Manager 

E. C. Farkab. '07 Literary Editor 

C. A. Smith. '07 Local Editor 

Mattie Pittman, '06 Exchange Editor 

Carrol. Walker. 'Or Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. '07 Subscription Manager 

L. E. GASTON. '08 J. A-MtM- T.oral Editors 

Minnie las. '07 f Assoc. L*cai juucois 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen. '08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter Intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late* 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Sept. 21, 1906. 




PI TO R 14 f. 





To all new students the Hera I J) extends a 
hearty welcome. A large class has lately been 
sent out from the student body, so you are 
stepping into a vacant place. We consider it 
a great privilege to be permitted to attend such 
an institution as ours, and we are all trying to 
be worthy of it in all phases of the world. The 
student body welcomes you in and desires you 
to make yourselves one with us as quickly as 
possible. Get acquainted with all the people 
you can in all the ways you can. Consider 
yourselves one in a large family and lose no 
opportunity to work for the general good of 
all. There will l>e no lack of opportunies, for 
we students are not afraid to tackle the stern 
propositions of life. In the College you will 
find three student papers, a weekly and two 
monthlies, six literary societies, three class 
associations, the Young Men's and the Young 
Women's Christian Associations and the Ath- 
letic Association. In these different phases of 



We call the attention of all Herald readers 
to the full-page "ad" of the Kansm Agricul- 
tural Review. The paper is published by the 
agricultural students of the College and shows 
an excellence that merits the highest apprecia- 
tion and which calls for your most hearty sup- 
port. We beg all students, new and old, and 
all alumni of the College to look upon it with 
favor and if possible to number it among your 
monthly visitors. 



Have you noticed the great number of im- 
provements that have been made about College 
during the summer? Though no new buildings 
have gone up it is evident that much has been 
done to make the buildings more convenient. 
Though our appropriation may be inadequate 
to our needs, the charge cannot be made that 
the money we do receive is not put to the 
best advantage. These many improvements 
indicate an enthusiasm on the part of the depart- 
ment heads that assures a lively and interest- 
ing year in each. 



We are glad to welcome you hack again, old 
students, and we wish you all success and 
pleasure in the year's work upon which you are 
entering. Though we do not wish to rate you 
on any of your past shortcomings, we beg of 
you even more hearty support in the various 
student movements of the year than you have 
shown before. Their highest success is the 
stake and one which we think worth working 
for. Though you will be called upon to make 
little sacrifices of time and attention, it is the 
little things that are the first factor in the make 
of the man and the success of his undertaking. 

We are sure that all new students have been 
introduced to the two Christian associations of 
the College long before this reaches your hands. 
But we cannot and do not wish to refrain from 
speaking a good word for them and their work. 
You were doubtless met at the trains by mem- 
bers who had no hesitation in losing a whole 
night of sleep that you might l>e directed to a 
place where you would be well received. After 
reaching these places you were doubtless shown 
every courtesy and assisted in securing a 
rooming and boarding place. This work is 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



29 



done freely and without reward by the mem- 
lwrs, and if they, with their many interests, 
can do this surely the associations merit the 
heartiest support of all. Enroll as a member, 
if your time permits, and work with a will in 
whatever is assigned you. Each association 
maintains a building or home which is open at 
all times to the boys and girls of the College. 
Do not hesitate to take advantage of all the 
l>enefits to be derived from them, for you will 
find them in no other place. The young men 
of the College will soon be introduced to a 
movement which is being carried on by the Y. 
M. C. A. A building which is to be the future 
home of the association will soon be in the 
course of erection. It is to cost $30, (KM), of 
which 122,000 have already been pledged. The 
remainder should soon be pledged that the 
work of building may not be interrupted for 
lack of funds. We will say no more than to 
ask you to look with favor on a movement 
most worthy and one that is to endure for all 
time. 

It is with pleasure we again open the cam- 
paign for the Athletic Association and the foot- 
ball team. The way football talk is heard, em- 
inating from almost every tongue, fills us with 
the assurance that the season of '05 is to Ik? a 
bright spot in the athletic annals of the Col- 
lege. We feel that if the whole lienefit of the 
game is to be derived by the few that take ac- 
tive part in it, Athletics in the College are not 
worth supporting. But we are firmly convinced 
that the game is not narrow in its benefits; that 
it ranks first in promoting College spirit and 
a general feeling of a common interest. Fresh 
air and sunlight are attendant with the games. 
Comradeship and goodfellowship are fostered 
by it, and the enthusiasm it is bound to inspire 
cannot help but spread to other activities and 
to leave its imprint on the man, and so we be- 
lieve that our College athletics should be 
pushed to the full extent. For a few the sup- 
port of the association is a great burden. For 
us all it is almost insignificant to the individ- 
ual. Your attention is called to the two arti- 
cles which are running in the paper this week. 
There the diiferent phases of the football work 
of the fall are touched upon. We wish to 
speak especially of the season tickets. It is 
hoped that six hundred will quickly and easily 
be disposed of at one dollar each. Though we 
assure you that your dollar will be appreciated 
aud that the six hundred will put the associa- 
tion on firm ground, we want more than this: 
something that cannot be measured in dollars. 
We want you, your interest, your enthusiasm 
and your presence at the games and on the 



practice grounds. Come out for a few minutes 
once or twice a week. Get the names of the 
men that are playing and their positions. Set 
it down in your note-book and revise it before 
each game. Get acquainted with the men, and in 
every way that you can support the team. It is 
your team and your interest and co-operation 
will insure it success. You may be called upon 
to make little sacrifices of time and attention, 
but what you deny yourself in a good cause will 
never be missed. To the new men who have 
aspirations we can only say, play hard. 
Throw yourself into it as though it were life 
and death and use your head. Think while 
you act and see a reason for every move. For 
your benefit, games for the second team are be- 
ing secured by the general manager. You 
should try to make these games count their full 
value in your football experience and fit you 
to step up into a place on the first team. 

Football Schedule 

The following is the football schedule for 

the season of 19(15: 

AT MANHATTAN 

Friends October 7 

Washburn October 14 

St. Mary's October 28 

Fairmont November 4 

Haskell Indians November 18 

Normal November 30 

OUT-OF-TOWN GAMES 

Salina Wesleyan October 21, at Salina 

Kansas University. .November 24, at Lawrence 

The second team plays the Normal second 
team at Emporia, November 30. The game 
that was to have l»een played with Lindsborg 
November 11 is cancelled, and the date is still 
open. Several applications have been made 
for the game, but it is probable that it will go 
to the Kansas City Athletic Club, at Kansas 
City. 

A meeting of the Athletic Association is soon 
to be called to elect a manager to succeed Clyde 
Lewis, who will not be in College, and also a 
manager for the second team. A more ex- 
tended schedule is to be arranged for the sec- 
ond team. ___ 

It seems second nature for some men to suc- 
ceed, but any man with ordinary ability can 
win in this world if he is willing to work his 
brain up to eighty per cent of its highest effic- 
iency in the right line. 

The dean of Chicago University announces 
that the university will be divided up into small 
colleges, which is somewhat upon the English 
plan. All of these small divisions will be oper- 
ated under one head and plan of direction. 



30 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Read Askren's ad. on first page. 

Guy Crise is attending St. Mary's college. 

Gribblc's bread; made to eat; bard to beat. 

Will Randall is with a surveying squad in 
Texas, 

Miss Cora McNutt will assist in the Library 
this fall. 

Mr. Shaw has l>een away on a two weeks' 
vacation. 

A colony of red squirrels are making their 
home on the Campus. 

Professor Brink preached at the Baptist 
church Sunday morning. 

The report that Jay Worswick had entered 
the matrimonial lists was unfounded. 

New card cases for authors and titles have 
been placed in the Library. 

E. L. Shattuck will gather laundry this win- 
ter, taking Chitty's old job. 

Addie Clark, a former student, will attend 
the business college at Salina, this fall. 

Professors McKeever and Kammeyer went to 
Colorado during the G. A. R. encampment. 

W. W. Smith is rebuilding bis "Auto" in 
preparation for his daily distribution of the 
Star and Times. 

Milton Snodgrass will be hack in school this 
fall to complete the College course and gradu- 
ate with the '<Hi class. 

Arch Moore, formerly of the class of '03, 
worked in the Chemical Department during the 
summer on sugar analysis. 

Hassman, Cole and Harris are enjoying life 
with the IT. S. engineering corps, at Ft. Wm. 
McKinley, near Manila, P. I. 

Twenty -five farmers' institutes have Iwen 
held this summer, with many of the professors 
and assistants in attendance'. 

Walter Curs, who has been night engineer at 
the Manhattan flour mill this summer, had two 
of his fingers crushed last week. 

Chauncy Weaver's sojourn at Armour Insti- 
tute in Chicago was cut short by the serious 
injury of his father at midsummer. 

The Library has accessioned and catalogued 
about 850 volumes during the summer and sent 
an equal number to the State bindery. 

At the first Y. M. C. A. cabinet meeting this 
year. Secretary McLean served lemonade made 
from lemons grown on his father's farm in Cal- 
ifornia. 



Professor Ten Kyck reports that the drouth 
has injured several fields this year, the level- 
planted and sod land suffering more than the 
older fields. 

The Domestic Science Department has a lab- 
oratory fitted out with electric cooking appa- 
ratus for the benefit of the students in post- 
graduate work. 

Harry .Tudd, a student last year, spent Sat- 
urday and Sunday in Manhattan. He is farm- 
ing in Marshall county now and will not be 
back in College. 

Doctor Barnes is very much pleased with his 
new horse, "Billy, The Kid." He was pur- 
chased in August at Ft. Riley after exhibiting 
himself in a 2:13 gait. 

As usual, Professor McFarland's pumpkins 
have taken possession of everything in sight. 
The professor has never demonstrated whether 
they make good pies or not. 

Assistant McClenahan and Miss.Iennie Lynn 
were married in Tarkio, Mo., September 12. 
Mr. McClenahan has taken up postgraduate 
work at his alma mater Yale. 

Professor Ten Kyck has made a numl>er of 
improvements on his farm west of town, one of 
which is a round barn. It is exciting quite a 
hit of comment among the residents of College 
Hill. * 

Mr. L. W. Goss, a graduate of Ohio State 
University, has been elected to succeed Doctor 
Foster. Mr. Goss came in last week and has 
taken up his work. Richard Meyers will assist 
him in the laboratory. 

The price of prairie-dog poison has been 
raised from DO cents per quart to 11.10 and 
11.75 a gallon to $2.00. The reason was the 
lack of appropriation and a raise of eight per 
cent in the price of strychnine. 

The Farm Department experimented this sum- 
mer with catch crops, following wheat and oats. 
Cow-peas and rape were used, drilled in with a 
disk drill behind the binder. A heavy gvvvn 
crop was plowed under this fall. 

Professor Walters put up a sculpture exhibit 
last week for the Beatrice Creamery Company, 
at the Nebraska State Fair in Lincoln. The 
exhibit comprised a cave and a huge polar l>ear 
and required .'{213 pounds of butter. 

Mr. M. S. Brandt will assist Professor Wal- 
ters in the architecture course. Mr. Brandt is 
a Yale graduate and will teach geometrical and 
projection drawing. He has been doing prac- 
tical engineering work during the past year for 
the Sunset Mining Company, of Colorado. 

The Hort. melon patch suffered complete an- 
nihilation early in the season this year. It is 
said that Professor Dickens beard One of the 
farmer boys praying, "Lead us not into temp- 
tation." The removal of the patch to parts un- 
known was the unexpected result. 

The electrical laboratory has had added a 
dressing and locker room for the engineers. 
A storage battery room containing sixty cells 
and giving one hundred twenty volts has also 
been added, and Professor kyer is making 
plans for further improvements when the nec- 
essary cash develops. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



31 



Read Ask pen's ad. on first page. 

Students, lie sure to eat Gribble's Hunger 
Cure. 

A big order of new instruments will soon lie 
on hand for the band men. 

President Nichols built a boat in the carpen- 
ter-shops this summer for his son, Hay. 

Doctor Barnes recently made a ten days' 
visit in New York and a week's visit in Chicago. 

C A. Smith returned from Topeka, Monday 
morning, where he has been visiting relatives. 

C. A. Smith, '07, will not lie in College this 
year. He will continue his work in the Nation- 
alist office. 

For candies, nuts, fruits, ice-cream and cold 
drinks go to J. F. Harrison, the College Gro- 
cery. 

Capt. P. M. Shaffer and Jack Smith spent a 
few days hunting in Sheridan county the first 
of the week. 

The College Grocery is the place at which to 
get your candies, nuts, fruits, and cold drinks. 

-J.'F. Harrison. 

The 'scope- and- view men are holding their 
beads pretty high now. They say they have 
made some money. 

Professor Dickens was away last week judg- 
ing fruit at the lola fair and "taking in'' the 
State Fair at Topeka. 

The Y. W. C A. girls have been very busy 
for the past week, moving into their new home, 
on Manhattan Avenue. 

The football grounds are covered with a 
beautiful carpet of green that is waiting for the 
tramp of the .football squad. 

The Printing Department is getting out a 
large reference and note-book for Professor 
Price's American history classes. 

Sol. Cunningham and Horace Bixby have 
been caring for the College lawns this summer, 
under the supervision of Coach Ahearn. 

Scott Fav and Jens Nygard, both of the '05 
class have* accepted positions as chemists at a 
sugar-beet factory in Rocky Ford. ColOi 

Professor Kinzer left Monday morning for 
the Hutchinson State Fair. He has placed 
some of the College cattle on exhibition there. 

The general manager of the athletic asso- 
ciation has a gorgeous supply of football pos- 
ters with which to advertise the games. Watch 
for them. 

All the unsigbtliness that surrounded the 
Auditorium last spring has disappeared. A 
beautiful covering of grass has spread ovet 
the grades. 

At the Congregational church Sunday even- 
ing Rev. O. B. Thurston will preach a sermon 
especially for students.^ His subject is, I he 
Face Beyond the Door." 

Colonel Moore, chairman of the National 
Good Roads Committee, was about College 
last week, together with several prominent 
members of the Commercial Club. 



Professor Dickens is away this week judging 
fruit at the Hutchinson State Fair. He will 
also attend the meeting" of the American Po- 
mologtcal Society, at Kansas City. 

The Christian Kndeavor Society of the Con- 
gregational church, corner Juliette and Poyntz 
avenues, will give a reception to College stu- 
dents, in the parlors of the church, Monday 
evening. 

O. B. Whipple, '04, stopped with friends in 
Manhattan a short time ago on his way from 
Amherst, Mass., to Ft. Collins, Colo., where 
he has a position as assistant in horticulture 
in the state college. 

The regular force of the Agricultural De- 
partment comprises, besides the head and his 
two assistants, a stenographer, farm foreman, 
six student assistants, three teamsters, and 
three general farm hands. 

The Dairy Department has decided to work 
on a cash basis. Milk tickets will be issued- to 
all who patronize the creamery. The building 
will be open until 12:15 during the noon hour 
and will then close until one o'clock. 

Prof. R. S. Mackintosh, professor of horti- 
culture in the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
at Auburn, visited Professor Dickens and the 
College Monday and Tuesday. C. F. Kinman, 
'04, is working under Professor Mackintosh. 

Miss Elizabeth Tilton, a former student of 
K. S. A. C, is type-setter on the paper pub- 
lished on Pike's Peak during the tourist season. 
This is the highest point in the world at which 
a paper is published, and shows that K. S. A. 
C. people will get up in the world. 

Professor Willard returned Saturday from 
his extended trip through Germany, where he 
has studied agricultural and experimental 
work in German institutions. We are asking 
Professor Willard for a short account of his 
trip, and we may soon have it for you. 

The Farm Department is gathering seed-corn 
at present with the view of securing the best 
possible o-rade. The corn is selected in the 
field from stalks which show a proper develop- 
ment. The corn is then stored in the drying 
room, where artificial heat is supplied and 
where the corn is at all times protected from 
freezing. 

The hulnxtiiitlixt. the Jayhawke)', and the Her- 
ald will all appear in new dress this year. 
New tvpe to the value of $800 has been pur- 
chased and is now in use. Improvements ag- 
^re^atin^ $1000 in cost have been made in the 
composing room alone. The printing-office 
also lias a new roller-top desk for Mr. Rick- 
man's use. and the stock-room has been sup- 
plied to a value of over $000. 



in 



The following have l»een elected to positions 

m the board of instruction of the College, 
ranking as assistants: Gertrude Stump, B. H., 
K S A. C„ assistant in sewing; Howard M. 
Watkins, B. S Iowa State Od^M*** 
in chemistry: Herman A. Wood, B. S., Olivet, 
assistant in chemistry: George C. Wheeler B. 
s K S A. C, assistant mammal husbandry, 
and George P. Jackson, B. Ph., Chicago Uni- 
versity, assistant in German. 



32 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



X ALUMNI X 




W. F. Lawry, '00, asks to have his Herald 
sent to 4145 Indiana Avenue, Chicago. 

E. N. Rodell, '03, returned last Saturday 
from a visit at his home in Marquette. 

Gertrude Nicholson, '05, is bossing the job 
at Oak Grove school, just east of town. 

Jessie Sweet, '05, is enioving her work as 
teacher in a school near Glasgow, Kan. 

Retta Womer, '04, is a junior in the four- 
year pharmacy course at K. U. this term. 

George Fielding, who is with the General 
Electric Company in the East, is visiting at 
home. 

Sarah Houghraan, >03, spent a part of the 
summer with Pearl Holderman, m at her 
home near Chetopa. 

V. L. Cory, '04, and Leslie Fitz, '02, are 
surveying the new IT. S, grass experiment 
station at McPherson, Kan. 

Ivan Nixon, '03, assistant state entomologist 
of New York, has been visiting relatives and 
friends in and about Manhattan. 

Russel Oakley, '03, stopped in Manhattan 
last week as he came this way on his duties as 
grass expert for the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

Estella Fearon, '03, has returned to Boston, 
where she will graduate next spring from the 
Boston Normal School of Gymnastics. 

Louis B, Bender, '04, says: "All's lovely 
and the goose hangs high. Send my Herald 
to 485 Adams Street instead of 550 W. Monroe, 
as heretofore." 

^ Gertrude Stump, '9(5, will fill the place of In a 
Cowles, '01, as teacher of sewing during Miss 
Cowles' leave of absence. She is attending 
school in the East. 

Earl Wheeler, '05, is working for his M. S. 
in electrical engineering at Cornell. He is 
rooming with Nick Schmitz, '04, who is popu- 
larly known around the campus there as 
"Windy Kansas." 

Frank Bates, '04, has been spending the 
summer in the view business and has seen con- 
siderable country in the northwest. He also 
took in the sights in Portland. Frank has 
worked his graft so well that he intends to 
attend Cornell this winter. 

The Herald was kindly remembered with an 
announcement which reads as follows: "Mr. 
and Mrs. James T. Mason anuounce the mar- 
riage of their daughter, Edna Emma, to Rich- 
ard Franklin Bourne, Wednesday evening 
September 6, 1905. At home after September 
JJ *»18 Troost Avenue, Kansas City, Mo." 
Mr. Bourne is a member of the class of '03 
and the first year after his graduation was an 
assistant in the veterinary Department at his 
Alma Mater. Since then he has been a student 
and assistant in the Kansas City Veterinary 
College. The Herald and many friends at K. 
b, A. C. extend congratulations. 



Read Askren's ad. on first page. 

Phone 188 for Gribhle's bread, pies, and 
cakes. 

Have you taken note of the improvements 
about College? 

Assistant Sheffer has lieen visiting at K. TI. 
He returned Saturday. 

The recent rains have put the fields of the 
College farm in fine condition for fall work. 

Professor Popenoe has Iwen engaged for 
some time in his work as State nursery in- 
spector. 

More improvements have been made in Dairy 
Hall. Two long laboratory tables are the late 
additions. 

The College agricultural exhibits at the State 
Fair were about the only exhibits of the kind 
on the grounds. 

About three thousand specimens have l>f>en 
added to the museum this summer. A new wall 
case has also been installed. 

Six hundred combination lwked mail boxes 
have been installed at the post-office and are 
rented out to one, two or three students at the 
rate of fifteen cents per term. 

We have a Japanese in College this fall 
He is taking special work in dairying, and ex- 
pects to follow it up in several institutions and 
then return to Japan to teach. 

The Board of Regents has ordered that all 
heads of departments shall make a report of 
the work in progress in the department to the 
Septeml>er meeting of the Board. The report 
of the Agricultural Department covers nineteen 
typewritten pages, touching upon four hundred 
different experiments. 

The College Band will go to Kansas City, 
October 3, to take part in the Priests of Pallas 
parade. This will certainly l>e a treat for the 
boys and one worth a great deal of hard work 
Assistant Harry Brown will have the hand well 
organized by the end of the week and expects 
the band to make a good impression. 

Y. W. a A, Notes 

The first social of the year will l>e held Fri- 
day night at the Y. W. C. A. House, 017 Man- 
hattan avenue. 

The first devotional meeting will l)e held Sat- 
urday noon, in the Alpha Beta hMl, at 12*20 
Cora McNutt will l>e the leader. 

Cora McNutt, Flora Hull, Margaret Cun- 
ningham and Miss Thayer attended the Sum- 
mer Conference of Young Women's Christian 
Associations, at Waterloo, in August. 

New headquarters have been obtained for 
this year at 617 Manhattan avenue. The whole 

u« Use v 1 ,*. in u the ,p h L ar *f e 0* the association. 
Scrubbing bees" have been in order durinw 
the past week The social Union of the Meth- 
odist church has furnished one room and the 
Congregational ladies have furnished another 
As far as possible we want all College irirls to 
make this their home. It is open to them at 
all times and is for use. The Friday night 
social will be in the nature of a house warmino- 



^-_ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



33 



JOHN COONS QFcoujgBg | 

i 

a M <\KE OUR SI OPE TAILOR AND SHOEIittEP THE BIG NEW i 

\ YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT YOUR SERVICE CLOTHING HOUSE \ 



Headquar ters for Uniforms 

See our $15 hand/tailored outfit JC 2%, Beats 'em all 



Crete Spencer, '(15, is working as deputy in 
the register of deeds' office. 

A. F. Turner, '05, is teacher of agriculture 
in the Norton county high school. 

Kd. Richardson, '55, is about College con- 
structing a gasoline traction engine. 

C. W. Fryhofer, '05, is taking postgraduate 
work at Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 

Ij. J. Munger, '05, is farming in Cloud county. 
Rumor says he wants a cook; D. S. preferred. 

Mary Minis, 'i>8, Gertrude Barnes, assistant 
librarian, and Margaret Minis, '01, spent their 
vacation in Colorado. 

George Wolf, '05, is in the switch-board 
department of the Western Electric Company 
at Chicago. His address is 49 Warren Avenue. 

Miss Georgia Quinn, '07, will not attend Col- 
lege this year. The Quinn family leaves Man- 
hattan in a short time for their new home in 
Arizona. 

Geo. O. Greene, '00, who for some time was 
assistant in horticulture here, is now secretary 
and cashier of the Russell County Co-operative 
Association. 

J. C. Cunningham, '05, who is at present 
traveling salesman for the Crete Nursery Com- 
pany, is succeeding well, and is next to H. Vin- 
all,*'0;i, who is foreman. 

Miss Mamie Cunningham, 'ft5, was in Man-, 
hattan, September 7, on the way from her home 
near Glasco, Kan., to Fairview, Okla., where 
she will teach in the city school. 



Walter Ballard, '05, is back in College taking 
postgraduate work. He will be chief cider 
taster for the Hort., with an equipment of two 
straws— one small and one large. 

Helen Monsch, '04, who was last winter a 
student in Chicago University, will substitute 
for Clara Pancake, '08, in the D, S. Dept. dur- 
ing the fall term. Miss Pancake will, on ac- 
count of ill health, remain in Topeka, where 
her address will lie 1324 Topeka Avenue. 

Mamie Alexander, '02, and Frank Boyd, a 
member of the '03 class, were married at the 
Alexander home near the campus on August 15. 
They have the best wishes of their many friends, 
to whom they are at home in Phillipsburg, 
Kan. Mr. Boyd is editor of the Phillips Omtity 
Post. 

Emily Wiest, '04, and Jesse W. Joss, senior 
in '01, were married at the Presbyterian church 
of Manhattan. Wednesday evening, August 13. 
They left for Colorado after the wedding recep- 
tion, which was held at the Wiest home, corner 
of Poyntz and Juliette avenues. The best 
wishes of many friends go with them. After 
October 1 they will be at home in Kansas City. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEAtfcR IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR COLLEGE BOOKS 
AND SUPPLIES. 



» 
ft 
ft 
ft 

'% 



Textbooks, Drawing Sets, Drawing Materials, Stationery, Fountain Pens, etc, etc. * 

Spalding's Line Sporting Goods. J 

3 31 1 POYNTZ AVE. 31 \ POYNTZ AVE. g 



34 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



$2,25 Board 



AT 



Graham House 



Best board in town for the money. 
Furnished rooms at the same place. 
All modern conveniencies. For ladies 
and gentlemen. First house south of 
College. Write or see J. M. Garrity. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLAS S 

PHOTOS 




Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year, 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Ovmr Union National Bank. 



Mi DODGE BOARDING CLUB 

BOARD and ROOHS 

One Block East of Main 
Entrance. 

Mrs. S. V. Dodge - 1129 Vattier St. 



bjfcfcjUb GROW 

Elevator on C R, I. & P, Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons; 

Office 11345 N, Second St, 



The Midland Home 

BOARD and ROOMS 

Rates Reasonable. I 1 04 Moro St. 

Address or see C. L. Evans, Manhattan, Kan. 



KING'S 



HOME-MADE CANDIES 
FOUNTAIN DRINKS 

ICE-CREAM 

'•We Leadf Others Follow." 



KINGS 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

AI ENGEL B ROTHERS 
Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



PROFESSION A L. 
DR. G. A. CKISE, DENTIST. 

34 yearn of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DENTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Buildin*. 327Poyntz. 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Office 66: Res. 63. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 1 in Union National Bank Building. Pine 
Kold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave NO 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*- . Downstairs. 



Offl<>e Phone 3P7 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



35 



WOLF'S 

COTTAGE STUDIO 



We make Photographs 

COME and SEE 

OPPOSITE CARNEGIE LIBRARY 

Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

! MlilHFlftTIIRPRR OF -■ ^ 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. DInc Cultivators, 
Safety Cora Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swinirs. Oak Stoves. Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work, 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone «. 

Manhattan, Kan. 706 N. Third Street. 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEG ETAB LES, Etc. 

- - - 33 



PHONE 



R B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



219 Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Budding. . . 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine line clgtrs mnd toilet mrtlcles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, C, Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Oil. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop, 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

ICE-CREAM 

and 

SODAS 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



QO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best* X X 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r 




i 



L 



We make all our own 



Candi 



les 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. :: :: 




AU kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 
Right. :: :: 



Fountain • Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 



ICE CREAM SODAS. 



The Star Grocery Co. 

JOHN PURCELL 

Dealers in Staple and Fancy 

GROCERIES 

327 POYNTZ AVE. 

TELEPHONE 34 

We Deliver Qoods Promptly to Any Part 
a; a; a; of the City x x x 



I 





THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



37 



e^-* 



5 

5 






WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 

ROBERTS & OTTOWA \ 

CLOTHIERS ) 

MANHATTAN, - KANSAS \ 

WE WANT TO KNOW YOU f 






K FRUIT BOOK 

■^ 44 pages 9x12 inches; "22 colored plates showing in natural 

"colors 216 varieties of Fruit, with concise description, including season 

of ripening of each; 64 half-tone views of Nurseries, Orchards, Packing 

Houses, etc. Send 50 cts. and we will send the book post-paid, and Rebate Ticket 

permitting return of honk by mall within 60 days and we refund 50 cts. Or, mail 

within 1 year, Rebate Ticket with $12 order for nursery stock and we credit $1.0(1 

in part payment on order and you keep the book free. WE PAY THE FREIGHT. 

Tim n 1 V rico weekly and want more home and traveling salesmen. Outfit 

W U K A I 1/ AMI FREE.-STARI BRO'S, Louisiana, «o., Atlantic, Iowa, Fayetteville, Ark. 




Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X x> 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X> 



Phone 



226 



We're After You 



WE are now making 
UN IFOitMS 
in our own tailor si. ops. 
Wo liave added a better 
grade. The only place 
where uniforms are made 
in Manhattan. We make 
and nell more unicornis 
than any other firm in 
town; also show the 
greatest stock of clothing 
and shoes. Three tailors 
and a shoemaker at your 
service. * * < * * 



E. L. KNOSTMAN. 



Your first duty is to subscribe for the Herald! 



== 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




EYE 



AND 



SEAR 
INFIRMARY 



All kinds of Eye Diseases, suryi- 
cal or otherwise, are treated in the 
latest and most scientific manner. 



i IF GLASSES ARE NEEDED the vision should be tented by the latest and most approved methods 

f. Over ax*.) prescriptions are on file at the infirmary of "a tractive cases in Central Kansas, that have heen ac 

1 curatelv fitted with glasses. No better work can be done In this particular in Kansas City or Chicago 

f til asses' are made for each case after the examination: and are made to suit the eyes and to look just rlirht 

j on the face. Where the eyes are concerned It pays to have the beat 



ted it pnyH to have the bent* m 

S. D. ROSS, M. D. J 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



w 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



Students' Co-op, Boardi 



Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

//. H. Conwell, - - Steward. 

, .,>> , >,.,., , ,. 1 , n iin . i nnnr i ni inn nmnn)IM nnri0)iuuuu nnnoo ^^ 




■ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



STUDENTS' CCMDP, BOOKSTORE 



COLLEGE 
TEXTBOOKS 



Drawing: Instruments, Drawing: Paper, Pens, Pencils, Tablets, Note- Books, 
Writing; Paper. All College Supplies. Second-hand Books bought and sold. 

WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN. 




No effort or expense has been spared to make this the strongest and 
best course ever presented at K. S. A. C. The attractions not only 
furnish an entertainment every month during the year, but are a means 
of instruction no student can afford to miss. Nine numbers, as follows: 

LECTURERS 

Ex-Governor La Follet, of Wisconsin; Willett; Edward Bok, Editor 

The Ladies' Home Journal; Wickersham. 

MUSICALS 

Simmons-Jackson Concert Company; Cleveland Ladies' Orchestra; 

The Chicago Glee Club. 

NOVELTIES 

Xr Kellogg, the Bird Man; Parlatt, Crayon Artist. 3C 




40 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



* m 

% College Campus Restaurant 1 
S 

X CONVENIENT TO THE COLLEGE \X 

1 FIRST-CLASS BOARD I 

^^ — ■* . - ^— 

M Meals and Lunches, Short Orders tm 

£ Oysters, Sodas, and Confections 3 

S — — — — — — B 

% Garver & Barrett, :: Proprietors % 



■J* ' ^ 



Parkview Hospital 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
Open to the Profession of Kansas for the Benefit of the Public. 

Non-con taglous medical and surgical cases received. Preference of 
physician. 

THERAPEUTIC ADVANTAGE8.-<1) The best quality of food served 
temptingly, and selected as Indicated for the case. <2) Modified rorms of 
rest cure carefully carried out. (3) Manage or the electric vibrator. <4> 
The latent and up-to-date electric machinery to meet the required electro- 
therapy of neurological practice. 

. ^„ ^ M ^* "^ * "*«-■! ^^ r** * «»» r ° r tpe » tn l Rnt •* rheumatism. Rates for rheumatic 

treatment Private apartments. Electric light and steam heat. Up-to-date 
equipment. Nurses can be furnished at your home at reasonable terms 
upon application to the superintendent. »»««« i»rm» 

A co-operative movement is being started among the students by which 
a deposit of iwo dollars each by not less than five Hundred secures to all In 
case of sickness, a guarantee of hospital care and treatment for one term. 

HOSPITAL, N. NINTH AND FREMONT STREETS. TELEPHONE 123 

FLORENCE A. DRIVER, Supt. and Mgr. 







m 



CS t> • SjVK^: 



m 



150,000 DAIRY FARMERS 

ABE GOING TO BE ADDED TO THE BIG ARMY OP 
MORE THAN SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND USERS OP 

DE LAVAL 

CREAH SEPARATORS 

DURING THE YEAR 1905 



The all-important profit-earn- 
ing, time-saving need of the 
Cream Separator is now univer- 
sally recognized by every one. 

As between different separa- 
tors the De Laval is the original, 
and has for twenty-five years led 
ia centrifugal separation. 
Would-be imitating machines 
simply utilize the construction 
which expired De Laval patents 
leave free to them. New patents 
still protect modern improve- 
ments. 

The St Louis Exposition 
gave the Grand Prize (very 
highest award) to the De Laval 
Separators and three Grand and 
Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors 
and improvers, while the Grand 
Prize and Gold Medal butter ex- 
hibits were all De Laval made. 



A CATALOGUE AND ANY DESIBEO PA |™CU- 
LAR8 ABE TO BE HAD FOB THE ASKING 



M DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



Randolph and Canal 8U, 
Chicago 



lfflie Fork 



' : 






1 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x a; 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



; 



* 
* 

* 



I 

* 



STILL THE B EST PL ACE FOR STUDENTS TO TRADE 
AND STILL BETTER THIS YEAR THAN EVER BEFORE 



Tablets, Pencils, Pens, Stationery, Note Books, Ink, 
Photo Supplies, always fresh. Ladies' and Men's 
Furnishings, House Furnishings, Scissors, Pocket 
Knives, Table Cutlery, Fancy China, Souvenir Goods 
Novelties, Etc. A Swell Line of New Belts, Bags, 
Handkerchiefs and Neckwear just received. 



YOU NOT ONLY GET THE PRICE HERE, BUT QUALITY AS WELL 



Harrison, 



mmmmmmmmmmiimmmmmmmmmm 

The Big Racket X 1 

s 
3 

i 

I 

i 

I 



*********S****«*WSiHRWS^^ 




. . ■ 




WP*WWWP^WW ,Pf ^^^ 




%hc Students' Herald 



i 



I 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College A) X 





i 



i 



PLEASE 

EXCHANGE 



\ 



I 



I 





■ 



Keuffel & Esser Co. 

* OF* NEini YORK * 

708 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS («££«). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



extend to every student a cordial invitation to visit 
our sta re* ^e have the largest, newest, up^tevdate 
stock of JEWELRY in Manhattan, X X X X 



OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING DEPARTMENT 
is one of the best equipped shops in Kansas, 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT is managed by an Expert 
optician, who makes a specialty of curing 

HEADACHES, NERVOUSNESS, DIZZINESS, PAINS IN 
EYEBALLS CAUSED FROM DEFECTIVE EYESIGHT 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED with any of these defects, we guarantee 
to cure or it costs you nothing. 



— -t. 



ASKREN 



THE JEWELER 
AND OPTICIAN. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



41 



STUDENTS' COOP, BOOKSTORE 



COLLEGE 
TEXTBOOKS 



WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN. 



TheJ^ 

No effort or expense has been spared to make this the strongest and 
best course ever presented at K. S. -A. C The attractions not only 
furnish an entertainment every month during the year, but are a means 
of instruction no student can afford to miss. Nine numbers, as tallows: 

f FCTURERS 

Ex-Govemor La FoOette, of Wisconsin; Dr. H. S. Willett; Edward 

Bok, Editor The Ladies* Home Journal; Wickersham. 

MUSICALS 

SamrmVjackson Concert Company; Cleveland Udies* Orchestra; 

The Chicago Glee Club. 
" NOVELTIES 

X Kellogg, the Bird Man; Ralph Parlette, Humorist V 



Season Ticket, 



Reserved, 

Only 



$2.00 



§ 






W&WMffiM-r^tl 



■ ;/,iii. 



OPENING NUMBER, LA FOLLETTE, OCTOBER 2. 



42 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry •Goods 
Room* 

■ When you get material 
for your fall and winter 
dress you will not go 
amiss if you get Mo- 
hair. This popular fab- 
ric is shown in a variety 
of shades, prices range 
from 50 cents to $1.00. 
We own a good assort- 
ment of colorings at 50 
cents a yard. 



Ready-to-wear Parlor. 

The new goods in this 
department are tailor- 
made Suits, Skirts, 
Shirt Waists, Under- 
muslins, Corset Covers, 
Caps, etc. Call in and 
see them. 



Hardware Room. 

Bicycles, Boat Oars, 
Pocket Knives, Razors, 

Stoves, etc. 



Shoe 

Department. 

Our Shoes for fall and 
winter are here, you can 
get what you want in 
Footwear. Gymna- 
sium Slippers a 
specialty. 



Grocery Room* 

See us for pure goods 
at popular prices. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms upstairs- 
Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



PASTE IN YOUR HAT 



I 



THE LEADER 




THE LEADER 



I 



THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 
"Courtney's Full- Vamp Shoes are Good Enough for Me" 

SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 




MOORE BROS. & CO. 



I 




Published 
Each Thursday Bv 
Jhe Students Or The: 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorlietEveiyQDe "Cultivate His OuinGenias. 



VolumeXI. 



Manhattan, Kan., September 28, 1905. 



Number 3 



The Society and The Student 

When the young American bids farewell to 
his friends at home, and starts on his way to 
college, it is generally expected that upon his 
return, after having completed a four-years 
course, that he will be an educated man, able 
to converse on any subject of science or litera- 
ture and command a handsome salary without 
physical labor and with little mental exertion. 
How often it is we are disappointed. This 
frustration, however, is not without cause. 
Yet rarely do we ascribe any cause other than 
that due to the student's sluggish efforts. In 
many cases this may be true, but many times 
we find that the standing of the student is high 
with respect to grades ; but this only increases 
our surprise that the graduate is not a success- 
ful man. 

There may be various reasons why the stu- 
dent is slow in acquiring fame and wealth, but 
no matter how well the texts are mastered, no 
matter how high the markings may be, if the 
student lacks the ability to communicate his 
ideas to his fellow men his education is useless. 
There has probably never been a man whose 
writings have been so famous for their kind as 
those of Alfred Tennyson, yet the first of his 
writings were criticised not on account of the 
small amount of sentiment which his soul pos- 
sessed but on account of the manner in which 
this feeling was given to his readers. In fact, 
many men have become famous for the manner in 
which they communicate their ideas rather than 
for the greatness of the thoughts themselves. 

Thus it is we see in our college life the need, 
first of all, to obtain knowledge of our science 
from the text, and, secondly, we must cultivate 
a means of putting the additional knowledge 
we obtain into such form as to be understood 
by those whom we expect to benefit by our ed- 
ucation. 



It is in this capacity that the literary society 
is found to be most invaluable. Not only does 
it train the member in giving ideas to the pub- 
lic by requiring him to think while speaking to 
an audience, as is necessary in debates and 
extemporaneous speeches, but the member 
learns to he at ease, command the attention 
and imbue the same feeling to those around 
him as that he himself possesses. 

The benefits of a good literary society do 
not end here. All students need some sort of 
recreation for both mind and body. Football, 
baseball, tennis and basket-ball are a few good 
forms for the physical part, yet the mental re- 
laxation should not be neglected. Here, also, 
the literary society plays an important part. 
Besides a mental rest one receives a valuable 
practice in parliamentary "rags," and it is seen 
that this education is needed in any walk of 
life, no matter what branch of science a person 
may choose for a life work. 

The men who constructed the plan of peace 
between Russia and Japan probably started 
their diplomatic career in a literary society of 
some sort. If they had never been active mem- 
bers, other names would probably have been 
written as signatures to the peace treaty. 

In general, the college literary society is 
probably the most benificial of all student en- 
terprises, as it puts upon the student that vir- 
tue which the world calls "polish." This en- 
ables him to meet his fellow man, gain his 
ideas and profit by his experience, thus mak- 
ing the student a broader and a wiser man. 

The men who are leaders in public affairs 
to-day are the men who have a training fur- 
nished by nothing so well as by a literary 

society. 

As there are six literary societies in our Col- 
lege, every student should be a member of the 
one that suits his fancy best. 



46 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



If you are a new student, by all means join 
a literary society, if it be your good fortune to 
have the opportunity. It will make you a 
closer friend of your fellow student. It will 
better fit you to be a part of the great machine 
that turns out the laws and the government of 
our country. 

The ideal member of a literary society puts 
as much zeal and enthusiasm into his society 
work as he does into his regular College 
studies. He should feel that unless he takes an 
active part and strives to make his society 
l>etter he is not only depriving himself of valu- 
able information but is retarding the growth 
of those who cry "Long live the K. g. A. C. 
literary society." C. I. Weaver. 



Football Progress 

Have you heen out to watch the football team 
at practice? If you have not, you should do 
so at once. Practice began last Thursday and 
hard scrimmage work l>egan Monday. A large 
number of men are working under Coach 
Ahearn and Mr. Melick and they are rapidly 
getting into condition. Some of the old men 
did not report for practice until this week, hut 
they are nearly all out now and everybody is 
working hard. Many new players have re- 
ported, several of them being old high-school 
players with more or less experience. 

At a meeting of last year's players held 
Thursday morning, Carl Mallon was elected 
captain to succeed Vern Hess, who did not re- 
turn to College. Mallon is a hard worker, a 
good player, and he will make a dandy cap- 
tain. He will very likely fill his old place at 
left half, where he has done such good work 
for the last two seasons. Scholz will be at his 
old position at full, and will hit the line in the 
same old way. Kirk and Nystrom are both 
candidates for left half, and both of them are 
good men who have had experience. Unless 
Cunningham can arrange his work so as to 
permit him to play at quarter, it is likely that 
Kirk w"ill play that position until a new* man 
can be found. Cooley is playing his old posi- 
tion at right tackle, and Montgomery will 
probably play at left. If Walker does not de- 
cide to play we will need a new set of ends. 
Thurston and Stauffer are both candidates for 
end positions, as are also several new men. 
The centre trio will probably be composed of 
new men. Brown and Munsell have not yet re- 
turned, but it will not be hard to select a pair of 
guards out of the following group: Farrer, Gas- 
ton, R. Cave, Harris, Haggman and Larmor. 
Whipple will very likely play at centre, for he 
is showing up well and is big and strong. 
Among the new players who are making a par- 



ticularly good showing are Edelblute, Madt- 
son, Blake, Johnson, B. Cave, Colwell, Oskins 
and Whipple. 

The season tickets are being rapidly disposed 
of and it is hoped that all will be sold by the 
end of the week. The first game is with Friends 
University, on October 7. Our boys feel confi- 
dent that they can repeat the defeat which they 
gave the Friends last year, and with a large 
crowd and lots of enthusiasm they can do it by 
a large score. 

Alpha Betas 

At 2:30 p. m. Saturday, a crowd of loyal Al- 
pha Betas were called to order by the record- 
ing secretary, Mr. Birch, the vice-president 
being absent. After singing and prayer, Mr. 
Phillips was elected president pro tern. 

The program consisted of but two numbers, 
a violin solo by Miss Lane and a good number 
of the "Gleaner" by May Gritting. 

We soon proceded to elect officers for the 
present term. Miss May Harris will call the 
A. B.'s to order in the future: Mr. Birch is 
vice-president; Mr. Garver, recording secre- 
tary; Mr. Ireland, corresponding secretary; 
Miss Helen Westgate, critic; Miss Anna Toliii, 
musical director; Mr. Solt, marsh all; Miss 
Chloe Willis, treasurer. For members of the 
board, Miss Venus Kimball, Miss Lucy Need- 
ham, Miss May Griffing, Mr. Skinner and Mr. 
Frank Harris were elected. 

Mr. Beeman and Mr. Ballard being present, 
we called upon them to give us speeches, which 
they did and received the appreciation of the 
society. 

Ionian 

Our vice-president, Cora McNutt, presided 
over the remaining Ionians last Saturday, in 
the first meeting of the year. 

V. Brooks acted as our accompanist and 
Margaret Cunningham led in devotion. Since 
this was election day, the program consisted 
entirely of music, and it was good music too. 
The first number was a piano solo by Bessie 
Nicolet, and the second was a violin solo with 
piano accompaniment, rendered by Misses Lane 
and Kahl. Bessie Nicolet was again called 
upon and again gave a pleasing selection. 
After this Viola Secrest entertained the society 
with a piano solo and responded to the hearty 
encore it received. 

The voting being still in progress, Lena 
Finley was called upon for an "'05" talk and we 
were told what it feels like to be an alumnus. 
Laura Lyman discoursed at full length upon the 
attractions of Pike's Peak, but having never 
been there had to draw on her imagination 
quite freely. We desired very much to hear 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



from Edith Forsyth, a treatise on ' 'burro rid- 
ing, " but she declared the sensation to be in- 
describable and we missed much valuable in- 
formation. Some "staid" seniors felt very 
curious about the life in an army camp during 
summer vacation and called upon Laura Ly- 
man as a person most fitted by her advantages 
to tell us. Miss Lyman felt somewhat reticent 
about it, but finally managed to inform us of 
what she had learned in the art of war. 

The results of the election showed that Cora 
McNutt was elected president and Laura Ly- 
man vice-president. s. H. 

Franklins 

Society was called to order Saturday evening 
by Vice-President Greenough. After the usual 
opening exercises the following officers were 
elected: President, B. W. Thurston: vice-presi- 
dent, E. L. Shattuck: recording secretary, Miss 
Tillie Trunk: corresponding secretary, L. M. 
Graham: critic, Mr. McClasky: treasurer, Mr. 
Kirby; marshal, Mr. Oldsen; member of board 
of directors, Mr. Daniels; assistant marshal, 
Mr. Oldsen. 

A short business session ensued, followed by 
extemporaneous speaking, in which the senti- 
ment of the society proved to be heartily in 
favor of encouraging society work among the 
new students. 

This closed the evening session. W. W. 0, 

Websters 

Society was called to order at 8 P. M. by 
Vice-President Kiene. After roll-call and read- 
ing of the minutes, the following officers were 
elected and installed: F. A. Kiene, president: 
Grover Kahl, recording secretary: "Banty" 
Williams, corresponding secretary: W. M. 
Putnam, treasurer: Carroll Walker, critic; 
Ross Sweet, marshal. F. W. Caldwell, H. H. 
Conwell and R. E. Paine were elected as mem- 
bers of the program committee, and A. C. Fer- 
ris, C. S. Conner and J. E. George members 
of the board of directors. J. J. w. 



Hamiltons 

The Hamiltons elected the following officers 
to act during the fall term: President, R. A. 
Cassell; vice-president, C. I. Weaver; record- 
ing secretary, A. D. Halloway, corresponding 
secretary, Ernest Adams; critic, J. H. Cheney: 
treasurer, C. E. Whipple: chairman program 
committee, C. E. Davis; chairman of board, 
.Toe Montgomery. L * A * R ' 

There is no truth for man but in thoughts 
that are human; pessimism is inhuman. - 
Wagwr. 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 

Enroll in a mission study class. 

Prayer meeting every Wednesday evening at 
the parlors. 

Mr. George Lerrigo, of Topeka, gave a very 
helpful address to the young men of the Col- 
lege last Sunday afternoon at the Congrega- 
tional church. A good-sized audience listened 
carefully to his words, which were especially 
applicable to College men. 

The opening reception to new students at the 
Domestic Science Hall last Friday evening was 
well attended, and in spite of the warm night a 
good, jolly time was had. Professor Eyer and 
Mr. Melick gave short talks, both of which were 
thoroughly appreciated by all. A quartette 
composed of Messrs. Farrar, Beeman, Kittell 
and Roberts sang a number of selections and 
were heartily encored. 

The Y. M. C. A. Bible study classes will 
meet for organization Sunday, October 1. The 
following table will be of interest to the 
students here, in that it shows the comparative 
rank of our own institution: 



Institution. 



i 

3 



1876 
1205 
2992 
1800 

1406 
1210 
1100 
2857 
2100 
2500 



Men 
in Bilile Classes. 



1003 



1004 



290 
129 
234 
219 
106 
170 

94 
119 

65 
199 



470 
253 
400 
960 
235 
362 
205 
269 
251 
1S7 



1905 



I 



604 
5K4 
5K4 
453 
426 
394 
375 
370 
351 
350 



750 
800 
800 
700 
800 
500 
600 
600 
500 
500 



University of Illinois .... 

Iowa State College 

Yale 

University of Toronto.. 
Ohio State University.. . 

Princeton. ■■••-J-- 

KaiiHUM Agrl. College, , 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Wisconsin 
Cornell 

It will be noticed that K. S. A. C. ranks 
seventh in this table. To hold her place will 
mean some hard work, as a number of insti- 
tutions are planning to enroll at least 500 men. 
The total number of men enrolled last year 
was 30, 109. 

■ 

A Few Quotations 

"Our only greatness is what we aspire." 

"Guard your weak point. Be lord over your- 
self." 

"Memory is the only paradise from which 
we cannot be driven." 

"Give an American youth health and the al- 
phabet, and who shall place limits to his career? 
With push and perseverance he can conquer 
the world." 

"The important thing in life is to have a 
great aim and perseverance to attain it. Don't 
be satisfied to 'keep going.' Be sure you are 
going somewhere." 



48 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 




Mot to; UtCvIKY 
OMC C VLTlyATt Hi* 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan, Kan,, as second- 
class mutter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, Ave cents. 



P. A. KIKNK.-06 Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Heim. '06 Business Manager 

E. C. Fahkab. W Literary Editor 

C. A. Smith. W Local Editor 

Mattie Pittman, '06 Exchange Editor 

Carrol Walker, '07 Ass m. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. '07 Subscription Manager 

L.E. GASTON. '08' i T 

MtNNiE Ihb, '07 f ■ Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizahbth Sweet. "04 Alumni Editor 

J.R. Cqxen. 08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and Inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late-i 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this Item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due und that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager, 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any Information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Sept. 28, 1905. 




The six literary societies of the College de- 
serve the attention of ail the students in school, 
both new and old. The general object of all is 
to furnish parliamentary practice and a liter- 
ary training to the members. It will be the lot 
of all college-trained men and women at some 
time in their lives to be called upon to preside 
in various gatherings, and it is highly impor- 
tant that this be done willingly and with 
credit at every call. This is expected of you, 
and your measurement as well as that of the 
College will be taken from your conduct on 
such occasions. It is undoubtedly a truth that 
a well-equipped and well-trained parliamenta- 
rian is one of the most valuable additions that 
comes to society from the colleges. No man 
lives to himself, and his greatest work is ac- 
complished in dealing with his fellow men. He 
cannot meet them on equal footing unless he is 
experienced, and society work is one of the 
best methods in which he may file from his as- 



sociates some of this valuable material which 
is called "polish." This it is that makes an 
impression on your associates, that makes them 
value your friendship and desire your com- 
pany. The society is a valuable place in which 
to look for friends, but we should be cosmopol- 
itan and not confine ourselves to one small 
circle. The more people you know and are in- 
timate with the greater in number are your op- 
portunities for doing good. • 



We wish to speak a few words to all who are 
in doubt over the purchase of football season 
tickets. Though the five young men who are 
assigned to sell the tickets may appear before 
you in the guise of grafters, they are working 
not for themselves but for the good of the Ath- 
letic Association and entirely without recom- 
pense. This they do gladly because their Col- 
lege experience has taught them that athletie 
work is one of the most pleasant and profitable 
enterprises carried on among the students. It 
is the wish of the management to put out six 
hundred tickets at one dollar for each, and 
thus ensure the expenses of the team. But in 
doing this they are working for something that 
cannot be counted in dollars and cents; the 
hearty support of six hundred individuals and 
the promise of an enthusiastic demonstration 
and a pleasant time at each and every game. 
It is hard work for a mere handful to cheer a 
losing team, but it is even harder for a strong 
team to play against a strong team when inter- 
est is at a low ebb and support a minus quan- 
tity. We believe in doing nothing by halves, 
and as the association lives and thrives on the 
work and interest of the students, it is inexcu- 
sable for any student to hold aloof at a time 
when his co-operation means so much for suc- 
cess. For a few the burden of the Athjetie As- 
sociation is almost unbearable. For us> all it 
is insignificant to the individual. The men 
that are active at present in the association 
work will soon leave and then their duties will 
devolve upon new men. A little work at pres- 
ent and a lively interest will prepare you for 
the future and insure a live organization in the 
years that follow. By all means, students, of 
whatever age or station, get into the ranks of 
the Athletic Association and push. Make all 
the attendant sacrifices and accept the assur- 
ance that in a measure as you interest yourself 
and work will good be derived. 



Try to be happy in this present moment, and 
put not off being so to a time to come; as 
though that time should be of another make 
from this, which has already come, and is 
sure.— T. Fuller. 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



49 




LaFollette, October 2. 

Read Askren's ad. on first page. 

The Herald is in need of a new calendar. 

Gribble's bread; made to eat; hard to boat. 

A score-card for the football games is being 
issued. 

Lecture course tickets on sale to-day. Buy 
a couple, quick. 

The electrical engineers had their first labo- 
ratory work last Friday. 

The Co-operative Association held a busi- 
ness meeting Tuesday evening. 

Bob. Cassell has been elected football mana- 
ger in place of Clyde Lewis, who is out of Col- 
lege. 

The Herald is starting a menagerie. A cat, 
a mouse, and a cockroach have already teen 
secured. 

The large barn that was built last summer is 
for general experimental purposes with sheep 
and hogs. 

The old lockers from the Armory will proba- 
bly be changed to the dressing-room of the 
football boys. 

Two model silos have been donated the Ani- 
mal Husbandry Department. They will be 
used for class work. 

Miss Jones, who took Miss Alexander's place 
as stenographer for Professor TenEyck, is tak- 
ing some College work. 

The Farm Department is busy harvesting 
their soy-beans and cow-peas. The fall seed- 
ing will begin this week. 

President and Mrs. Nichols will give a re- 
ception to the Board of Regents and Faculty 
this evening at their residence. 

The barn on Professor McFarland's farm 
near Olathe was struck by lightning and burned 
September 18. The loss not covered by insur- 
ance was about $1000. 

C. S. Dearborn has accepted a position in 
the Montana state college, which is located at 
Bozeman. He will be assistant professor of 
mechanical engineering. 

The drawing of seats for the lecture course 
will be made more convenient this year by the 
use of a new ticket board. The work is being 
done in the College carpenter-shops. 

It is said that a certain senior ties a brick 
on each shoulder and sleeps sitting in a en air. 
He will not get his shoulder straps until next 
week and wants to be prepared for them. 



Read Askren's ad. on first page. 

Russel Porter will attend K. U. this year. 

Phone 188 for Gribble's bread, pies, and 
cakes. 

Have you been out to see the football prac- 
tice? It's worth your while. 

Miss Ellen Berkley is assistant stenographer 
and bookkeeper for the Farm Department. 

J. H. Pel ham, horticulturist of the Fort 
Hays station, is here taking graduate work. 

The Co-op. book-store did more business 
last week than any other week in their history. 

Bea Cave won a shirt during the recent 
White Sox games. He had the highest batting 
average. 

Dr. M. Jeannette Stockton, osteopathic 
physician, 113 south Third street. Codsulta- 
tion free. Phone 1144. 

The Co-op. "grafters" ran out of work last 
week and put in their spare time slaying weeds 
on the adjoining lots. 

A delightful reception was given to the Col- 
lege students in the chapel of the Presbyterian 
church last Monday evening. 

You can't afford to miss hearing the open- 
ing number of the lecture course, by Ex-Gov- 
ernor LaFollette, of Wisconsin. 

E. A. Wright, of the Electrical Department, 
is wiring Professor Roberts' lecture room for 
the new lantern recently purchased. 

At the Congregational ehureh, O. B. Thurs- 
ton, pastor, next Sunday evening, October 1, 
the theme of the sermon will be: "Half Man- 
hood Entire Failure." Seats are free; all are 
invited. 

According to the Kansas City Star, the stu- 
dents of K. U. have voluntarily abolished 
class scraps. Chancellor Strong deserves 
a great deal of credit for engineering the thing 
through, though. 

. Last Friday evening about 150 College girls 
attended the opening social held at the new Y. 
W. C. A. home. Various games and music 
were the principal amusements of the evening, 
while every one enjoyed the generous portions 
of watermelon, which were served on the lawn. 

While the Herald is always glad to welcome 
visitors to the office it does not experience se- 
vere thrills of joy when people continually use 
the office for a lounging place and interest 
themselves in the private correspondence and 
business of the paper. Everything of interest 
to the public will appear in the Herald in due 
time. 

Captain Schaffer has received a letter from 
the Bureau of Insular Affairs, Washington, 
requesting that he recommend two likely grad- 
uates of the College for appointment as Ihird 
Lieutenant in the Philippine Constabulary, at 
a salary of $1100 per year. College graduates 
are required to pass the physical examination 
only Any graduate of the classes of '04 and 
'05 who are interested in securing such an ap- 
pointment may get further information by ap- 
plying to Captain Shaffer. 



50 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Read Askren's ad. on first page. 

The city post-office is to be remodeled. 

As usual, Janitor Lewis is looking for trou- 
ble. 

Students, be sure to eat Gribble's Hunger 
Cure. 

Earl Thurston is chief side-line coach dur- 
ing football practice. 

At the recent Y. M. C. A. social the barrel 
was well patronized by student and professor. 

The foundry is getting out the brass locks 
for the doors of the drafting room and lockers. 

Professor Dickens attended the state fair at 
Hutchinson last week. He acted as chief fruit 
taster. 

The College well, which has given more or 
less trouble with quicksand, is being widened 
and deepened. 

The two silos were filled last week with corn, 
Kafflr-corn, and alfalfa. They hold one hun- 
dred tons each. 

Dr. M. Jeannette Stockton, osteopathic 
physician, 113 south Third street. Consulta- 
tion free. Phone 344. 

The Y. W.'s served watermelon at their so- 
cial Friday evening. This comes straight from 
a Y. M. who was there. 

Jim Cheney will oil the typewriter for the 
assistant stenographer of the farm department. 
He will take some College work. 

The flower plots around Mechanics Hall and 
in front of Horticultural Hall are most beauti- 
ful and speak well for tlve skill of Mr. Ahearn. 

Heard in the hall. Sophy girl: "He has 
just the loviliest mustache you ever saw. I'm 
going to be A 1 in Dutch and— just watch me." 

A drop hammer to be used in breaking me- 
iron has recently been cast in the foundry 
The hammer weighs 735 pounds and the anvil, 

The Botanical Department has just received 
a new lantern for class-room use. This ma- 
chine is so constructed that the projection of a 
picture of any kind or even the object itself 
may be thrown on the screen. 

The carpenter-shop presents many changes. 
The work-benches for students have been moved 
into the north wing, several new wood lathes 
have been added, everything has been treated 
to a coat of pamt, and Mr. House has shaved 

Ills utcLFQ, 

A new system of employing apprentices in 
the shops has been devised by Professor Mc- 
Cormick. Every six months a new man is 
chosen from the list of applications. The man 
chosen must agree to stay four years. He will 
receive pay from the start. 

f^ r Sl e ,f °r r S? XlH le * ve the first of n ^t week 
ror Salt Lake City, where he will judsre the 

dairy cattle at the Utah state fair. On October 

Hi 1 e Wll J ta S L P/ an ' Utah ' to J«dKe butter 
and cheese for the Western National Associa- 
te? lace 6 ° giV& an address at the l»t- 



X ALUMNI Z 




Miss Gertrude Nicholson, '05, visited College 
last Saturday, 

C. EL Whipple, a former member of the class 
of '04, has taken up his College work again. 

Wayne White, '05, is with the civil engineer- 
ing department of the Santa Fe, in southern 
New Mexico. 

T. E. Dial, '04, is doing construction work 
for the electrical department of the Santa Fe, 
in Arizona. 

Maud Zimmerman, '02, spent her vacation 
with several other parties camping in the foot- 
hills of the mighty Rockies. 

E. Jeannetta Zimmerman, '91, did lecturing 
and taught nature study work at the Boulder 
Colo., Chautauqua during the month of July. 

E. W. McCrone, '03, who has spent a year in 
the Kansas City Veterinary College, is going to 
take up work in the veterinary course at his 
alma mater this year. 

Fred Van Dorp, '05, is working for his fa- 
ther, at Ft. Russell, Wyoming. He says, "It's 
the most forsaken place I have ever seen. 
There is only one tree between our place and 
town (three miles) and it is a scrub cotton- 
wood." 

The alumni editor appreciates having the 
Hekald remembered with a "batch" of notes 
from the alumni who are not in Manhattan. 
Mr. Zimmerman, ex-exchange editor, hasn't 
forgotten the Herald yet. 

Edward Baker, second year in '03, has de- 
cided that a druggist's life isn't to his likinw 
and has returned to the farm. He and Asa 
Zimmerman, '00, spent a week together at the 
Wathena chautauqua during August. 

Any one who was in class with Frank Bates, 

04, has probably guessed that there was a mis- 
take in last week's issue in the statement that 
he was going to Cornell this winter. The '04' s 
all knew his aspirations toward Ann Arbor 
and the study of law. 

,S\ F - s Jevens, proprietor of the nurseries at 
Crete, Nebr,, says he would like two more men 

l£ et £ e ,*™ he has fron » K. S. A. C. H. N. 
Vto^l, 03, is manager, and J. C. Cunningham, 

05, writes that he is getting rich in the busi- 
ness. We don't know his title. 

lJ*J «A in T n '. '*!*' assi ^ant horticulturist 
in the State Agricultural College at Auburn 
Alabama, ran the department during the aln 
SC3, t Pfoft«»op Mcintosh this summer. 
Prank has been developing an eajfle eve for 
crown gall and San Jose scale on inspecting 
tours over the state. ■ 

Rev. R. U. Waldraven, '89, and family left 
this morning for Farmington, New Mexico, 
where he has accepted a call. Farmington is 
in the extreme northwestern part of the territory, 
and has no railroad, although one is building 
It is reached by rail to Aztec, a station forty 
or fifty miles south of Durango, Colo., and by 

d^nf f th V her ^ T Fa rmingtSn'is on the boZ 
der of the Navajo Indian reservation. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



51 



I JOHN COONS 5 

1. TT 1 J. X_ TT 'f- 



COURSES 






Headqua rters for Uniforms 

See our $15 hand/tailored outfit X X Beats 'em all 



• 



f mak-p mm STORE TAILOR AND SHOEMAKER THE BIG NEW i 

J YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT YOUR SERVICE *^ff^j 



Roland McKee, '00, spent a few days with 
home folks last week. 

Lorena ( Helder ) Morse, »94, topped for b 
week's visit with her parents in Manhattan last 
week. 

Miss Lena Finley, '05, is assisting at the 
College this term teaching algebra and gram- 
mar in the Preparatory Department. 

Kate Zimmerman, '00, will be assistant prin- 
cipal of the Fruits, Colo., high schoo I aga n 
this year. Her work began the first of Sep- 
tember. 

H W Avery, '01, of Wakefield, Kan., ex- 
hibited 'his Pereheon horses at the fair at 
• Hutchinson last week and at Pueblo, Colo., 
the week before. He carried off a large num- 
t>er of premiums. 

Prof. Albert Dickens, '93, read a paper be- 
fore the American Pomological Society at 
Kansas City last week. The name of F. W. 
Waucrh, '01, appears on the same program. 
Pressor Dickens went from Kansas City to 
Hutchinson, where he acted as a judge of ft 
at the fair! He saw James Thompson, a stu- 
dent in the early Ws, who was there with an 
exhibit of short-horn cattle. 



Mr. F. U. Christensen, '00, who is assistant 
in animal nutrition in the Experiment Station 
of the Pennsylvania State Col lege, visited 
Manhattan friends and the College last Thurs- 
day and Friday. He had been visiting his 
home near Randolph for two weeks and was 
returning to his work in Pennsylvania. 



The experimental feeding yards present .the 
appearance of a city by themselves. The huild- 
fn^s now comprise three double feeding barns 
and a large calf barn. 

The old drafting rooms have been »™«deled 
and changed into class rooms and the new 
SaftSS tables, which are now complete, are 
installed in the north wing upstair**. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone " 



FOOTBALL GOODS 

r^RAWING INSTRUMENTS 

f ■* ** VV ' *i l-\ mi m npr Met HiffKins' Ink, Drawing 

M ^* W*ffi£ K ^Sf Ide al ^ntain Pens 
Cetourprices.we can nveyoa money. Students always welcome 

Andersons Bookstore, p^a*** 




52 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






i 



WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 

ROBERTS & OTTOWA 

CLQTH1ERS 

MANHATTAN, - KANSAS 

WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 






i 

5 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 





Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town (or passen- 
gers. A) A 




Fare, 25 cents 




Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



We're After You 



Phone 



226 



VJTfE are now making 
" UNIFORMS 
in our own tailor shops. 
We have added a better 
grade. The only place 
where uniforms are made 
in Manhattan. We make 
and Nell more unicornis 
than any other firm in 
town; also show the 
greatest stock of clothing 
and shoes. Three tailors 
and a shoemaker at your 
service. 444*4 



E. L KNOSTMAN. 



VARNEY'S BOOKSTORE 

HEADQUARTERS 



Textbooks, Drawing Sets Drawing Materials, Stationery, Fountain Pens, etc, etc. 

Spalding's Line Sporting Goods/ 

311 POYNTZ AVE. 



311 POYNTZ AVE. 



ft 
ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 

ft 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



53 



$225 Board 



AT 



Graham House 

Best board in town for the money. 
Furnished rooms at the same place. 
All modern conveniencies. For ladies 
and gentlemen. First house south of 
College. Write or see J. M. Garrity. 



KING'S 



HOME/MADE CANDIES 
FOUNTAIN DRINKS 

ICE/CREAM 

"We Leadi Others Follow." 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

221 Poynti Avenue 




KING'S 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 
AUingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 
REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Over Union National Bank. 



tM DODGE BOARDING CLUB 

BOARD and ROOHS 

One Block East of Main 
Entrance. 

Mrs. S. V. Dodge - U29 V&ttier St. 

SEEDS grow 

Elevator on C. R. I. 8r P. Ry. 

Geo, T Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N, Second St, 



J.Q.A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing: 



PROFESSIONAL,. 

DR. O. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 

M years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



The Midland Home 

BOARD and ROOMS 

Rates Reasonable. 1 1 04 Moro St 
Addreu oi see C. L. Evans, Manhattan. Kan. 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DENTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building. ^Poynt?.. 
Over tne Star Grocery. Phones*: Office 68; Res. 63. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 

p rtnm , q and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Pine 
S^ort T specfalVy Special price to College students. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res- ^one. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*., Downstairs. 



Office Phone :W7 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



54 



i 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



WOLF'S 

COTTAGE STUDIO 

We make Photographs 

COME and SEE 

OPPOSITE CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

MANUFACTURERS 0F_ 




Stove Repairs, etc. 
Manhattan, Kan. 



I'lirinc t;. 

706 N. Third Street. 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

r 

MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



F, B. ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 

Mm that fun, Kan. 



319 Poyntz Ave, 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59: 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

Porcel.labtti, tubs, tine line clgnrs ant toilet, rtlcles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest svstem 
of telegraph schools in America. " En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

WORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
Han Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 
SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz p, C , HOSTRUP, Prop, 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS ! 



FOR 

ICE-CREAM 

and 

SODAS 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERTS 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 

113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best X, A) 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO, 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



;>;> 




AND 



EAR 
INFIRMARY 



VhTT\^S 




Over 1000 prescriptions it re on 
ornately fitted with glasses 



All kinds of Eye Diseases, surgi- 
cal or otherwise, are treated in the 
latest and most scientific manner. 

> ^t™ «hmild be tested by the latest and most approved methods. 

the vision snoura ue ic»i™ ^ ^ oa«*- n i tr.muna t.iiaf, huve been ae- 

..j at the infirmary of -efract 
No better work can be done 



IF GLASSES ARE NEEDED the visioj ^™ u of u ^fr£5uve cases in Central Kansas, that have been a 

No bet£r work cin be done in this particular, in Kansas. Cityor Chlcw 
ten ffiin W" 1 ^""- „J1 -fSsr the examination; and are made tos 
6 m '#!,ere theses 6 are ^SonclrnedTpayH t« have the »>e B t f 



lade to suit the eyes and to look just right 



on the face. 



^, 



S. D. RO SS, M. P. j 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, PROP. 



Students' Co-op. joarcli ngj^ 

Two blocks from College gate Gives better meals 
for the money than any club m town Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Uub. 
Engage your load at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, - - Steward. 



■ ■ 



56 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r 



I 




"THE OLD RELIABLE 



»» 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



i 



i 



We make all our own 

Candies 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. 



Ji* 




• • •• 



PHONE 167 
PI 



All kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 
Right. :: » 



I 



I 



Foil n ta 1 T1 • Eve| y*mg Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

1 UUIliaill. ICE CREAM SODAS. 



I 



>H9MB< 



J 



emSSSErSSS 



^^^^^^^B^L^^^^^^^ 



THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

JOHN PURCEI I 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 



U 327 POYNTZ AVE. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly I 



lnirZ^r H °' 34 ' to Any Part orlhe^cityTTT^ 



College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

.Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections" 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 



' 



:l 






130,0G0 DAIRY FARMERS 

ARE GOING TO BE ADDED TO THE BIG ARMY OF 
MORE THAN SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND USERS OP 

DE LAVAL 

CREAfl SEPARATORS 

DURING THE YEAR I90S 



The all-Important profit-earn- 
ing, time-saving 1 need of the 
Cream Separator is now univer- 
sally recognized by every one. 

As between different separa- 
tors the De Laval is the original, 
and has for twenty-five years led 
In centrifugal separation. 
Would-be imitating machines 
simply utilize the construction 
which expired De Laval patents 
leave free to them. New patents 
still protect modern improve- 
ments. 

The St. Louis Exposition 
gave the Grand Prize (very 
highest award) to the De Laval 
Separators and three Grand and 
Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors 
and improvers, while the Grand 
Prize and Gold Medal butter ex- 
hibits were all De Laval made. 



A CATALOGUE ASTD ANT DESIRED PABTICU- 
IABS ABE TO BE HAP FOB THE ASKING 

M DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 









Canal 8tm, 



New Tork 



^^""" 



ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniform* for the least money. Confirm 
t)iis statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a Ml assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hate, Fine Caps. Etc X X X 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING a 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
yean enable* ui to meet their want! exactly, X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



W******XH******1 



« i 

The Big Racket 

STILL THE BEST PLACE FOR STUDENTS TO TRADE 
AND STILL BETTER THIS YEAR THAN EVER BEFORE 




Tablets, Pencils, Pens, Stationery, Note Books, Ink, 
Photo Supplies, always fresh. Ladies' and Men's 
Furnishings, House Furnishings, Scissors, Pocket 
Knives, Table Cutlery, Fancy China, Souvenir Goods, 
Novelties, Etc* A Swell line of New Belts, Bags, 
Handkerchiefs and Neckwear just received. 



YOU NOT ONLY GET THB PRICE HERE, BUT QUALITY AS WELL 

Chas, R Harrison, Prop, 




\ 






// -H 



* 



HChe Students' Herald 




Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X, 





s 







Keuffel & Esser Co 

* OF* NEin£ YORK * 

813 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraxon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS Qj^ 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



v /. v : ', w S t 



. 



We Extend to 

Every Student 



A cordial invitation to visit our store. 
We have the largest, newest, up-to- 
date stock of JEWELRY in Man- 
hattan. 

OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY 

Repairing Department is one of the 
best equipped shops in Kansas. 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Is managed by an expert optician, 
who mkaes a specialty of curing 
Headaches, Nervousness, Dizziness, 
Pains In Eyeballs caused from defec- 
tive eyesight. 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED 

With any of these defects, we guar- 
antee to cure or it costs you nothing. 



ASKREN 

The Jeweler and Optician.... 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 

"Courtn^'s FuUrVamp Shoes are Good 
Enough for Jfe." 



SOLD ONLY BY- 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 



\ 



THE STUDENTS 1 HERALD, 



57 




iW^Si 



J£ -M J ?*«^^ «" * 's^A-it 



^XmiWMWS^^M^^9^M£Mf/MMMMX 



* 



The Lectttffe Course 

No effort or expense has been spared to make this the strongest and 
best course ever presented at K. S. A. C. The attractions not only 
furnish an entertainment every month during the year, but are a means 
of instruction no student can afford to miss. Nine numbers, as follows: 

LECTURERS 

Ex-Governor La Follette, of Wisconsin; Dr. H. S. Willett; Edward 

Bok, Editor The Ladies' Home Journal; Wickersham. 

MUSICALS 

Sammis-Jackson Concert Company; Cleveland Ladies' Orchestra; 

The Chicago Glee Club. 

NO V E L T I E S 

^ Kellogg, the Bird Man; Ralph Parlette, Humorist *X 




Students' Co-operative Bookstore. | 

College Text-Books. 

Dra win 8 IM Dr.wi„ 8 P.c,r, Pen.. Pencil,. Table,, Note-Book. », F*r. All CO, Suppll*. 

Second- Hand Booki bought and sold. 

5WATERMAN- S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN, j 

| The College Grocery andjkatjlarket. 

Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



I U6 MoroSt. 
Phone 227 



We deliver 
goods promptly 



JOHN F. HARRISON . . . . 



58 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 



M^m^ 




Dry /Goods 

Room, 



We are well aware that It is 
early to buy wool material 
for Dresses to be used during 
the Winter Season, but do 
not forget that it takes time 
to make a garment. If you get 
your fall Dress now, you will 
not be one of those who will 
have to wait when you need 
It, besides, the stock is now 
more complete than it will be 

later. 

Uebbert's Lining, to use with 
our good showing of woolen 
materials for dresses. 



Readytoswear Parlor. 

The new goods i n fc hi s 
department are tailor- 
made Suits, Skirts, 
Shirt Waists, Under- 
muslins, Corset Covers, 
Caps, etc. Call in and 
see them. 

Hardware Room, 

Bicycles, Boat Oars, 
Pocket Knives, Razors, 
Stoves, etc. 



Shoe 

Department. 

Our Shoes for fall and 
winter are here, you can 
get what you want in 
Footwear. Gymna- 
sium Slippers a 
specialty. 



Grocery Room. 

See us for pure goods 
at popular prices. 



We deliver «oods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready -to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town (or passen- 
gers. J& X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



LADIES' 

ATHLETIC SHOES 

x 

And all other 
kinds. Wo make 
a specialty of 
ffood servicahle 
shoes for College 
wear. A large 
stock of dress 
shoes, rubbers, 
polishes, etc. 

a; 

See our Shoe Maker for repairs 

E. L. Knostman 





Published 
Each Thursday Bv 
Jmc 5tuoents CVThe 
Kansas State Agricultural College ' 

MottalikEveiyQDcGultivateHis OmnGenias. 



VotajmeXI. 



Manhattan, Kan., October 5, 1905. 



Number 4 



The Loan Fund for K. S. A. C. Students 

About one mile east of Agricola, Kan., is a 
farm of two hundred forty acres that should 
he of much interest to students of this institu- 
tion and those expecting to attend K. S. A. C. 
In passing this farm the traveler sees a neat 




horses and two cats. He never sat for a pho- 
tograph. He had money in the hank and more 
property in France than he had in America. 
He was especially noted for attention to his 
own business and for making- all promises 
good. He had no use for the ways of the 
scheming American Yankee. 

Shortly before his death he gave all of his 
property to his neighbor, P. L. Williams, to 
be held in trust for "worthy white male stu- 
dents of the Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege." He said: "It isn't much, but it will 
help a little, and I think the boys will make 
better eitens if they go to the Agricultural 



P. L. Williams, Trustee of the Fund. 

frame house and a large stone barn, neither of 
which are unusal for that country, but that 
which attracts attention is the words, "K. B. 
A. C. Boys," in large white letters on a double 
corncrib and granary of unusual size.- Think- 
ing that the story of this farm and the use 
that is made of the fund of which it is a part 
might interest Herald readers, the writer se- 
cured the following facts. 

In 1874 Charles Silly, a Frenchman, came to 
Kansas and settled near what is now Agncola. 
By close attention t 3 business he was able to 
improve his farm so that when it was turned 
over to the fund it was valued at $5000. It has 
since increased in value. 

Silly was an eccentric man, living a solitary 
life and discouraging all who tried to be on 
friendly terms with him. It was rarely that ne 
left home. His only associates were three 




Farm Buildings. 

College." He knew that Mr. Williams had 
attended college on. borrowed money and that 
he was helping a friend through K. S. A. C. 

The income of the fund is loaned to worthy 
students who are working their way through 
school, and who can give satisfactory refer- 
ences. The low rate of 5 per cent is charged 
for the use of the money. Each student who 
uses a part of the fund is supposed to pay it 
back as soon as he has graduated or has left 
K S. A. C. Time to earn it is, of course, 



60 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



given to most of them. Knough is given each 
applicant to "set him on his feet" and make 
hi in self-support in g. The money is usually 
spoken for a month or so in advance, espec- 
ially in the fall of the year. 

Mr. Williams is peculiarly litted for the ' 
trust that lias been given him. Having been 



to one hundred, and it is the intention of the 
members to attend each game in a body. 
Either before or after each game a committee 
will be appointed, whose duty it will be to 
show the visitors around through the town and 
College and entertain them in any other way 
possible. In this way we will not onlv adver- 




Atrri cultural Hull. 



forced to make his own wny since a bov of 
seven and to work bis own way through the 
National University at Lebanon, Ohio." This 
taujfht hhn the proper value of a working stu- 
dent. After leaving college he taught school 
for eleven years. He now owns and manages 
the Buckeye Agency. Through this agencv he 
handles an enormous business in lands, loans, 
insurance, and collections, His address is 
Williamsburg, Kan., R. F. D. No. 2. 

L. K. Gaston. 

Procrastination is the thier of time 

»«'i ir . ,,, .'£ r veur il stetlls - tm a11 urefied. 
And to the mercies of a moment leaves 

1 he vast concerns of an eternal scene. 

■*■ Ymuvj. 

The Rooters' Club 

A meeting was held in the Herald office last 
Friday at which an organization, known as the 
Rooters' Club, was started. The purpose of the 
club as stated in the rules is: "To support the 
athletic teams of the College at all ^ames and 
to help entertain all visiting teams." The idea 
is something new here, but it has been success- 
fully tried at other schools, and it will be a suc- 
cess here. The membership of the club is limited 



tise the College, but will insure better treat- 
ment for our own teams when away on their 
trips. Kvery student in College should either 
be a member or a supporter of this club, for it 
is a step in the right direction. 



Yost's Football Catechism 

Fielding H. Yost, who has succeeded in accel- 
erating the game of football and who is every- 
where known as "Hurry up" Yost, has found 
time to write a book on the way in which he 
has managed to help speed the game on its 
way. In crisp sentences he gives these '"hurry 
ups" for players:. 

Be the first to line up. 

Get into every play. 

Be the first man down the field on a punt or 
a knockoff. 

Help your own runner with the ball ; never 
let him go it alone. 

Follow the ball: no one can play the game 
unless he is with the ball all the time. 

Fall on every fumble either by your own 
side or an opponent: this is very important. 

Block your man hard when you should 
block. 




*■■ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



61 



Learn the signals: yon can not play a fast 
(Tame unless you know them instantly. 

Learn to control your temper; if you can 
not do this you had better quit the yame. 

Do as your trainee and coach advise: if you 
know more about the game than they do, it is 
time for you to quit. 



Coxen and D. N. Neer, who mixed in a fifteen- 
minute argument over the question, "Revoked* 
That the freshman rule in the Topeka confer- 
ence should he adopted." After J. L. Smith's 
music, furnished hy Miss Perry, C, B» Gibbon 
dujr up an original story that was a dandy. 
Ro~ss Sweet introduced Miss Sweet, who fa- 




Interior View of Model Dniry Burn. 



Be versatile: do not be a machine player in 
your individual position. 

Tackle the runner, don't expect any one else 
to do it: see to it that you throw him toward 



his own jroal 



Eurodeiphiaa Society 



Society was called to order at 2:45. After 
the opening son,, we were led in J™- 

The following officers were Installed. Fresi 
dent, Winifred Dalton: v iee-presi dent Bol 
Hanson: corresponding ^^1^2^ 
redd: -recording secretary, Lomse Vtotog 
treasurer, Marie Coons: marshall, Lulu Ran 
nels: critic. Adah Lewis. 

Siring the session music was furnished hy 

the Mandolin Club and the Queer ^*V 

TlLUK HARROLD. 



Websters 

President Kiene rapped for order, and then 
the Websters answered to roll-call . 

The first number on the pro* ram was mus c 
by Krvin Harrold. furnished by Miss Harrold. 
Next came the debaters in the form of J. R. 



vored the society with a vocal solo, accom- 
panied by Miss Perry. Louis .Torjfenson told 
us of the advantages of canvassing af ter 
which R C Worswick introduced the mando- 
lin club. Fred Caldwell and H. R. Keim were 
called on for extemporaneous speeches^ fol- 
lowed bv a very interesting number of the Re- 
porter,'' bv Grover Kahl. Then F. B. Milli- 
kin told us what he thought of football. After 

critic's report, we went into closed »< JSM1 < >n - 

.) . .j . w . 

A. B. "Doin'a" 

In the absence of the vice-president, Mr. Al- 
lan Phillips called the Alpha Betas to order in 
their hall Saturday afternoon at two-thirty. 

Vfter a well-rendered vocal solo by Miss 
Catherine Ward, the society was led in devo- 
tion by J. R. Garver, and the busmess of he 
day was then taken up. The newly elected 
officers were installed and called to their re- 
spective places, and the new president, with 
the air of a veteran, announced the next thinjf 
in order was the program. 

The -Gleaner," by Miss Anna Tohn, was 



62 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



unusually good; Miss Kahl's music, furnished 
by the mandolin club, was especially pleasing, 
and Miss Westgate's criticisms were rather 
above the mediocre. 

Roll-call showed many old members absent, 
but those present made up in enthusiasm what 
they lacked in numbers. 

All things considered, the society has started 
well upon the new year. B the members feel 
that true society spirit, good will to each other 
and to other societies, the year Is hound to be 
a profitable one for the Alpha Betas. 

P. A. T. 



Hamiitons 

Society was called to order hy Vice-presi- 
dent It. Cassell. After the inauguration of 
Officers, "Bobby" pave on inaugural speech. 
The first number on the program was music by 
M. Elsas, accompanied by Miss Ingraham. 
'• Judge* ' Hazen read an interesting number of 
the "Recorder." The mandolin Hub. intro- 
duced by Mr. Gra bend ike, furnished some ex- 
cellent music, Mr. C. E. Davis on the affirma- 
tive and M. M. Hastings on the negative de- 
bated the subject '* Resolved, That human inno- 
vations of the religion of Jesus Christ should 
be discouraged." This was the last of the 
series of debates carried over from last year, 
and was the best the Harnps. have listened to 
for a- long while. Miss Beach, elocutionist, 
rendered a pleasing selection. Cheency criti- 
cised the society. jg, l, a. 



Y. W.C. A. Notes 

Sunday was "Rally Day" for the Bible and 
Mission Study. Reverend Hannum addressed 
the girls, after which enrolment cards were 
given out. 

The Saturday, noon meeting for this week is 
under the auspices of the finance committee, 
with Flora Hull as leader. Every girl is in- 
vited. 

Miss Rigg, our former secretary, spent a few 
days here during the week. 

Last Friday evening, after cabinet meeting,. 
Miss McNutt served pineapple ice to the cabi- 
net girls. A jolly social time followed. 
^ Everyone who did not hear Miss Thayer last 
Saturday missed something truly good* 

The state Y. W. C. A. convention is to be 
at Manhattan this year, from October 19 to 22. 
Here is a chance for every Association girl. 
The meetings will l>e especially fine, for we" are 
to have with us two national secretaries, Miss 
Paxson, leader of the Waterloo conference and 
national student secretary, and Miss Svmns, 
national city secretary. 



fonians 

Society was opened by singing, with Ger- 
trude Li II at the piano, after whieh we were led 
in devotion by Ruth Neiinan. 

After installation of officers, the first pro- 
gram of the year was opened with music by 
Cecil Barnett. This was especially interesting, 
as she is one of our new students. She re- 
sponded to an encore. Dot lie fse gave an in- 
teresting talk on Vacation Experience. After 
this the "Oracle" was read by Margaret Cun- 
ningham. The Queer Quartette then entertained 
the society and responded to a hearty encore. 
The paper, "Manhattan in the Summer Time," 
given by Blanche Robertson, was \^vy inter- 
esting. We were then highly entertained by a 
play given by Vcrda Murphy and Edna Bren- 
ner. The program was closed by tun sic fur- 
nished by the K. S. A. c. Mandolin Club, which 
refused an encore. 

Business meeting was held in closed session. 



Resolutions of the '06 Class 

Whkiikas. The Divine Ruler has seen lit and 
proper to take from this life Mrs. Greene, be it 

Resolved, That, we the members of the *0(idass 
extend our heartfelt sympathy to our friend 
and classmate. Rennie Greene, upon the recent 
death of his mother. Be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions b> 
placed in the records of the '(Hi class, one be 
printed in the STT'DnvTs' Herald, and one in 
his home paper. L. R. ELDER, 

KlWA BRKNNER, 

Bolink Hanson. 

Committee. 

Football Outlook 

Only two more days until our boys meet 
Ottawa University for the first game of the 
season. As the time draws near, the outlook 
for a winning team grows hrighter. The attend- 
ance at practice is fully as large as it was the 
first week and the men are working hard. The 
signal practice is fast and snappy and the 
scrimmage work is real football. The follow- 
ing is the probable line-up for Saturday's 
game: 

Centre— Whipple. 

,n llar , <ls Haggman and Ostium] or Brown. 
Tackles- Montgomery and Coolcv. 
Ends- Edelblute and Blake. 
Quarter— ( 'unningham. 
Half-backs— Kirk and Nvstrom. 
Full— Scholz. 

The substitutes are: 

Centre— Heinrich. ■ 

Guards Kurrar and Jeffs. 

Tackle Hart, 

Ends- Thurston. StautTer and Madtson. 

Backs- R. Cave and Johnson. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



63 



"'Representative Government" 
Last Monday evening* Robert M. I* toilette, 
ex-governor ami present senator from Wiscon- 
sin, delivered nn address in the College Audi- 
torium, which was the opening numher of the 
society lecture course. The attendance was 
good and it is hard to see how any one could 
have left without feeling well paid for the time 
spent. 

After two songs by the Ionian quartet. IV.)- 
fessor Kammeyer Introduced Mr. La Fotletle, 
who spoke for two and one- ha If hours on 
"Representative Government." H< J sketched 
br telly the history of our country: I old some- 
thing o! the trials and dangers through which 
we had passed, and then launched into his 
subject with the following stat *m mt: "We are 
tirst in agriculture, Ih-st In mines and mining, 
first in manufacture and first in commerce, yet 
I firmly believe that ire now stand In the 
shadow of the greatest danger that 1ms ever 
threatened our government.* 1 

From this point he spoke at length on the 
trust problem, finally branching olT and speak- 
ing particularly in regard to railroads and 
railroad legislation. Mr. LaFollette has de- 
voted years of time in working for fair rail- 
road legislation, both for his own stats and 
for the country at large, and his statements Pl . esj(lt , nt __ 



K. S. A. C. Directory 



HAMILTON SOCIETY 

President R- A. Cassell 

Vice-president C. I. Weaver 

Secretary A. D. Hollo way 

M«ets Saturday evening . at 7:30 o'clock, in North Soci- 
ety Hall. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY 

President P. A.Ktene.Jr 

Vice-president H. R. Heitn 

Secretary va u ^ ? l ■ 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock. In South Soci- 
ety Hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY • 

President Ma V Harris 

Vice-president Ray Birch 

Secretary J - R "arver 

Meets in Smith Society Hall. Saturday. 2:30 P. m. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY 

President ^V'SKSE* 

Vice-president R M^tSS 

Secretary ■ iillie Iru,m 

Meets in Franklin Hall. Saturday, at 7::H) k m. 

EITRODELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

President Ww.i red l);i m 

Vice-i* resident BoJine Hanson 

Seeret a ry . Ltwto* Flemin g 

Meets every Sat unlay in Franklin Hall, at 3:45 p. M. 

IONIAN SOCIETY 
President - f "^."i^SHm 

Jtt^ dw !r:;:::;;::::::;;:::::::::::.::^S^S 

Meets in Noftft Society Hall. Saturday, at 2:45 P. M. 



Y. W. C. A. 



President 

Vice-president 

Secretary 

(Jeneral Secretary 



.CoraE. McNutt 
. . . Helen Inskeep 

Ethel Berry 

Miss Thayer 



Weekly meet inn "di'irinir noon hour each Saturday in 
! Society Hall. The Home. B17 Manhattan Ave. 

Y.M. C. A. 



South Society 



, E. 0. FaiTar 




Office of public trust and who in 'any way be- 
trays this trust is just as guilty of treason a< 
was Reindict Arnold." His story o! Ins own 
experience in lighting party machines in his 
own state was perhaps the most interesting 1 tt- 
ture of the discourse. 

Mr. La Follette is an interesting, forceabl.- 
speaker who impresses bis hearers with a feel- 
toff that he has firmly grounded views for whit* 
he" is willing to light. His lecture may have 
been rather too long: it may not have been as 
interesting to some as a humorous lecture 
would have been, but we believe that a large 
part of the audience thoroughly appreciated it. 
and left feeling that they had been benefited by 
it. It is seldom that a speaker like Mr. La- 
Follette can be heard in a place like this, and 
the committee certainly deserves credit for se- 
curing him. If the remaining numbers on the 
course are as good as this one, we will have 
further reason to be grateful. 

Make anv one think he has been clever or 
agreeable and he will think you have beta so. 
— Nineteenth, Century. 



SSSurer"::::::::::'.".:::-.::::: ..vmun***. 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 

Selected Paragraphs 

If we from wealth to poverty descend. 
Want "ives to know the flatterer from the friend. 

— /) rift/en. 

All may do what has by man been done.- 
Ytmny. 

No one bekums suddenly viscious and dis- 
honest: like a coal pit. they may brake out 
suddenly, but they have been smoldering and 
charring for a long time. — Billing.*. 

When in the company of sensible men we 
ought to he doubly cautious of talking too 
much, lest we loose two good things- their 
.rood opinion and our own improvement; for 
what we have to say we know, hut what they 
have to say we know not.— C'ouVm. 

Christianity wants nothing so much in the 
world as sunny people; and the old are hun- 
grier for love than for bread : and the oil of 
joy is very cheap: and if you can help the poor 
,„i with a garment of praise it will be tetter for 
them than blankets.- Henry Drummond. 



64 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motm: LctEvEHY 
One Cultivate Hi j 
Own Qcnhml ■+• 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 

Entered at the postrofflee at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
clans matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 



F. A. KlENR. ■(» Editor-in-chief 

H. H. Heim. iKi Business Manager 

K. C. Fakkah. 07 Literarv Editor 

(}. 0. Kami., or Local Editor 

Math k Piti-man. 'nfi Exchange Editor 

Cakrol Walkek. W Assoc. Husiness Miinager 

J. S. Montcomehy. 07 Subscription Manager 

L. E.Uamton.'W i . _ , _ „, 

Minnie Ise. '07 f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth's vveet. 01 Alumni Editor 

J. B. Cox en. W Reporter 

All orders Tor subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late-i 
than Monday noon of each week. 

* ■ i m 

A red mark across this item means that vour subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Swrrt. 04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Oct. "j, 1905. 




Ape you a rooter? 



Ottawa ra The Farmers, Saturday. 

Watch for the Rooters Saturday afternoon. 

Every one is going to the game Saturday. 
You go with them. 



A rooters' club has recently been organized 
to fill the need of a leader in the support ac- 
corded the athletic teams during the year. 
The organization is not narrow in its view, be- 
lieving that an enthusiastic and successful 
athletic season will advance more than one in- 
terest of the College. By following out its ob- 
ject to the letter an assurance of first-class 
treatment and a jolly time for our boys when 
away on trips will undoubtedly be secured. 
Every loyal student of the College should get 
back of this movement and make the Rooters' 
Club what it should be. tlie live organization 
of the College. 



There is undoubtedly something at fault in 
our morning chapel exercises evidenced by a 
small attendance, and a disinterested attitude 
on the part of those that do attend. Chapel 
exercises should be interesting and not a drag. 
They cannot be made so unless something is 
done to catch the attention. We would sug- 
gest that a few hundred song books l>e distrib- 
uted over the house and that a block with ad- 
justable numbers for announcing the hymns he 
hung from the front of the pulpit. We have 
not forgotten our experiences in the old chapel 
room and some have expressed the wish that 
they might meet there again for a little of the 
genuine enjoyment it afforded. 

We are pleased to present this week a review 
of the K. S. A. C. Hoys' Fund and its origin. 
We are not aware of the exact number of boys 
who have been helped through College by this 
fund, but we know that it has been doing the 
work which its founder intended it to do. We 
feel that the endowment, if it may be called 
that, should be held In the highest respect by all 
students of the College, and especially by those 
who are directly benefited by it. It is seldom 
that such a benefit is found in connection with 
a State institution, but it is certain that it may 
be put to good use here. Its founder realized 
perhaps, that the h:»y who has backbone 
enough to stick t;> his resolve, regardless of 
difficulties, is the one that deserves help and 
the one who will return in full measure of citi- 
zenship all the benefits received. 

The Kanxuit Farmer contains in last week's 
issue an article reviewing the State Fair re- 
cently held at Topeka. The article is indeed 
well written, but there seems to be a little neg- 
ligence in crediting the College and the College 
men with the work that they did in making the 
agricultural and dairy exhibits what they were. 
I. D. Graham, associate editor of the Farmer 
is apparently getting all the praise for the 
showing made by the dairy exhibits while Pro- 
fessor Erf is mentioned as addressing the ladies 
one afternoon. The fact of the case is that Pro- 
fessor Erf planned the dairy and dairy machin- 
ery exhibit, secured the material to complete 
the exhibit, and worked incessantly for two 
weeks to make it a success, and was even forced 
to contribute from his own pocket to secure 
what he wanted. It was the suggestion of the 
management that the College should make the 
exhibit and secure the attendant advertisement, 
but it seems to be the policy at present to deny 
the people over the State the knowledge that 
the Agricultural College is alive and doing. 
Praise is sweet, but an institution of this kind 
is greater than an individual. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



65 



The student body is making a very poor 
showing in noise tins fall. When a few stu- 
dents start a yell, others listen instead of join- 
ing, and laugh when the result is a failure. K. 
S. A. C. rooters need a little education in 
eastern methods, where hundreds go through 
the list of yells as one voice. This will require, 
ftrst, that each man he filled with the det3r- 
mination to do his full share and. second, that 
he be determined in his efforts to help his 
weaker brother. Yells to be effective must lie 
loud and deep but snappy, and although "Jay 
rah" may be slow, something fast In combina- 
tion with it removes part of this objection. It 
is time to begin practice if we are to be effect- 
ive behind the football team in the games this 
fall. The Herald will be glad to print all good 
veils that mav be sent in, and songs also will 
be looked upon with favor. 

It is gratify ing to the patrons of the football 
game to see the number of men that are taking 
a lively interest in it, an interest that prompts 
them to join the ranks of the team. All the 
suits are taken and more will he required to 
fit out the roll of aspirants. All the old men 
have not reported, but they will probably be 
with the team before the end of the week. This 
is necessary to insure the success of the first 
team, as the rule debarring freshmen limits the 
choice to a comparatively small number of 
players. For any one to take an indifferent 
attitude, whatever the past experiences, is in- 
excusable at this time. It is the ambition of 
every one in the College ti> make a good team 
and insure a successful season, and the man 
that pulls back now is not a friend of the Col- 
lege or his fellow students. Many are throw- 
ing every energy into the work of starting toe 
year's activities in athletics, and it is neither 
right nor just for any person to put a straw in 
the way of their success. If the football sea- 
son proves to be unprofitable and unpleasant 
it will not be because of a lack of interest and 
enthusiasm on the part of the students, but be- 
cause of the failure on the part of the pi avers 
to meet the just expectations of their support- 
ers, __ 

Additional Local 

Earle Thurston is the Model Laundryman. 

Superintendent Lund removed the old steam 
boiler from the barn last Monday. 

Superintendent Lund will soon have the two 
large boilers in place, ready for heating. 

Any engineering students interested in air- 
ship building should consult Geo. A. Moftitt. 

The Franklin Hall has been improved by 
having the floor covered witli rubber matting. 



The Veterinary Department is having a large 
barn built. The building will be west of the 
Armory. 

About 175 new students are daily busying 
themselves and Foreman House in the earpen- 
ter-shop. 

President and Mrs. Nichols entertained the 
College employees and Regents last Thursday 
evening. 

Each number of the Society Lecture Course 
is the strongest and best of its class that could 
be engaged. 

A. D. Holloway is taking care of Coach 
Ahearn's work while the latter is coaching the 
football boys. 

The "Waw! Haw! Waw!" is mingling with 
the "Sis, Boom! Alpha Beta!" in Professor 
Dickens' home since October 1. 

The enrollment in Y. M. C. A. Bible study 
classes for last week was two hundred eighteen. 
The canvas is not yet eompletad. 

The surveying instruments were removed from 
the Physics Hall to the Main building last week. 
Seaton and Kahl did the work. 

Mrs. C. J. Barlow and her little son stopped 
on their way to Chickasha, I. T.. last wei j k to 
visit her sister, Miss Gertrude Barnes. 

Professor W. A. McKeever has composed a 
song entitled, "All Hail The G. A. R." Pro- 
fessor Hofer has set the words to music. 

Just received a new lot cuff buttons, lockets, 
and gents' gold and ribbon watch fobs at As- 
kren"s jewelry stor?. Call and see them. 

H. A. Sphuler, junior in the architectural 
course, has had his plans and specifications 
for a $4000 residence in Wamego accepted. 

The junior engineers are passing sleepless 
nights, pondering over calculus and physics. 
The Profs, call them the "engineer's sieve." 

The Friends University football team has 
disbanded, and canceled all scheduled games. 
Ottawa has been suhstitued for our game Sat- 
urday. 

A. F. Oassell and Herbert Groome, both of 
the '05 class, are juniors now in the veterinary 
course. Herbert and "il" now hold office in 
the '07 class. 

Did you ever notice how appropriate ar3 
the illustrations used in the last College cata- 
logue? For instance, just look at the one 
used in illustrating the domestic science short 
course, on page 110. 

Professor Kyer is talking of putting Janitor 
Lewis out of the west basement of the Physics 
Hall. The date has not been arranged so 
watch the Hekald for particulars.. 



66 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Football goods. — Frost & Davis. 

Have you enrolled for Bible study? 

R?ad Askren's ad. on second page of cover. 

Bicycles and bicycle sundries.- Frost A Da- 
vis. 

Bicycle and general repair shop. Frost & 
Davis. 

The surveyors are busy surveying the cam- 
pus again. 

One of the girls says Milo Hastings is getting 
chicken-hearted. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing a specialty. 
Askren, the jeweler. 

German Student (translating): "ft never pays 
to fatten an old women." 

F. A. Bird), of Topeka, visited his son Hay 
Monday and Tuesday. 

F. I. Hinshaw, county superintendent of Wa- 
baunsee county, visited the College last Friday. 

G rover Kahl has been elected local editor to 
take the place of Curtis Smith, who is not in 
College. 

Dr. M. Jeannette Stockton, osteopathic phy- 
sician, 113 south Third streat. Consultation 
free. Phone 344. 

Attorney J. Ci. Strong and wife, of Blue 
Rapids, were about the College taking in the 
sights last week. 

Hastings says that the chickens are all doing 
fine. The only death the past summer was the 
"Hamilton Hen/' 

The College band went to Kansas City Tues- 
day and returned Wednesday. The Band was 
third in the parade. 

S I. Thackrey, of Kansas City, Kan., stu- 
dent in '79 and 'Hit, visited relatives and friends 
around College last Friday. 

Professor Garcia, the head of the department 
of horticulture at th • New Mexico Agricultural 
College, was visiting here last week. 

The M. EL Church of Manhattan is holding 1 a 
Golden Jubilee this week. Governor Hock, 
and Bishop Hamilton are the principle speak- 
ers. 

Miss Grace Staley, of Blue Ranids. and Miss 
McKelvie, of Waterville, visited the College 
while they were in town last week on committee 
work for the Epworth League. 

The Board of Regents were in session at the 
College last week, transacting the usual busi- 
ness of the fall term. All members, except 
Regent Tulloss, were present. 



Among the new students who have entered 
College this year are six Filipinos and a Lap- 
lander. 

Student (who had just purchased 8 lecture 
course ticket): "When will the seats Ite re- 
served V" Coxen: "Not until after the first 
game." 

The deepest sympathy is extended to Mr. 
Rennie Greene, of the senior class, who was 
called home last week on account of the death 
of his mother. 

( hief Bugler Hughes wishes to announce that, 
being the son of his father, he will take charge 
of College affairs just as soon as he gets his 
studies arranged. 

Contractor Henry Rennet, of Topeka, was 
awarded the contracts for the addition to the 
boiler-room for $2210, and the new granary for 
$bMH). He will begin work at once. 

The many friends of Miss Clara Pancake 
will be glad to learn that she expects to be 

able to take up her work in the Domestic 
Science Department after the holidays. 

Assistant Brant, in the Department of 
Drawing, is going to attend the art lectures 
regular from now, on. He says that Professor 
Walters' art lectures are better than most ">()- 
cent comedies. 

Percy Li 11 has purchased a large "Morris 
Chair" for his room. It has a foot-rest and a 
patent writing-desk. Percy says he ran get his 
lessons in one-half of the time which his in- 
structors require. 

Grover Kahl drew a map of the campus for 
Superintendent Lund, the past vacation. The 
drawing shows the exact location of the build- 
ings, walks, drives, water-mains, sewers, 
drains, heating-tunnels, etc. 

The HERALD menagerie is a thing oi the 
past. The cat visited the D. S. once too often. 
The mouse followed Jim < 'oxen off and the 
cockroach killed himself eating the stale news 
that appeared in the INDUSTRIALIST this week. 

Miss Flora Rose and her mother arrived in 
Manhattan last Saturday afternoon. They 
greatly enjoyed the summer's vacation at Fort 
Hope, Canada, and we are glad to welcome 
Miss Rose back to her work in the Domestic 
Science Department. 

The following promotions have been an- 
nounced: Co. "A.." E. J. Evans, Captain: L. 
B. Hazen, 1st Lieut.: O. O. Morrison, 2nd 
Lieut, Co. "B.." C. t. Weaver. Capt.: John 
Calvin, 1st Lieut.: Clark. 2nd Lieut. Co. "C." 
H. R. Heim, Capt.: M. R. Shuler, 1st Lieut.; 
J. W. Painter, 2nd Lieut. Co, "D.," C. H. 
Withington, Capt.: J. M. Ryan, 1st Lieut.: 
Clarence Lambert, 2nd Lieut. 

O, H. Legg, freshman student last year, is 
now attending K. IT. He has been doin«- news- 
paper work at Girard during the summer and 
is now taking special work in journalism at the 
Imversity. In a letter recently received by a 
friend he said: "I half wish I "was back at*K. 
S. A. C., but of course it won't do to go back 
on K. u. The fact of the case is, that old K. 
S. A. p. is far ahead of K. l\ in many re- 
spects.'' 



THE STUDENTS' HEIIALD. 



67 



^-^^ * m W T^k/ifkJW **&/* .John Houser, *0#, assistant entomologist at 

L JOk I B //Mf/Vtf jmAk the Experiment Station, Wonster, Ohio. Henry 

&%/ /^M*0KSAVMA WM «"V Thomas, '04. and Carl Lane. '05* who are with 



h 



John Skinner, '<H, has been visiting friends 
in Manhattan. 

Myron Pierce has returned to College to fin- 
ish with the ! 0(i's. 

W. W. Stan field, '01. is testing seeds for the 
Fa i-in Department. 

Will Harold, '05, is able to b9 out again af 
ter a Beige <> f typhoid, 

A. M. Nash. "04, is attending the School of 
Mines at Golden, Colo. 

A. F. Cassell and If. Et. Oroome, both '05, 
are taking the veterinary course. 

J. H. Whipple, '04, is inspecting car- wheels 
Tortlie Santa We a t ( I 8 r den < ' i ty , 111. 

Emma (Smith) Bar*, 'OS, was showing ber 
husband and several others about College one 
day last week. 

Harvey Adams, 'OS, who has been at home 
during the summer, was about College a few- 
days last week. 

H Umberger, '05, writes from OswagOj Kan., 
to have his HERALD sent to that place in care 
of Deming Ranch. 

Charley Pstes, 'Ok has finished a successful 
season of farming and is in (Allege taking the 
veterinary course. 

Miss Margaret Cole. '05, left last Satur- 
day for Wakefield, where she will take up her 
work as a teacher. 

W P Terrell. '04. spent the summer at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where 
he was a student last winter. 

L C. Foster, MW, has been very sick with ty- 
phoid fever, in a hospital in La Junta, ( olo.. 
but is on the road to recovery now. 

Miss Eva Burtner, '05, began her school 
work Monday in the McDowell Creek district, 
about ten miles south of Manhattan. 

Miss Gertrude Hole, '08, is assisting Pro- 
fessor Shaw in experimental chemistry, mey 
are experimenting with eggs at present. 

Dovie Ulricb, '03, was given a bundle shower 
at the home of Rees Washington, and a rib- 
bon shower at the Failyer home, last week. 

Sunday evening, October 1. at the Fail yer 
home, on Ninth and Moro, Miss Maude Failye. 
'OS, and Prof. R. J. Klnzer were united mmai- 
riaW Only a few invited friends were m at- 
tendance. The Herald extends congratula- 
tions. 

Married, Sunday. October 1, at th? home of 
the bride's parents. ^•^M"-^; ?£ 
Coy, of Meriden Kan,, Miss Nellie McCoy, 0&, 
to Leon D. ("'over, of Winslow. Ariz. M • 
Cover was in College in 1900. when he met 
Miss McCoy, one of the most winsome girls 0»I 
the '05 class. The day after the ewwaony toe 
happy couple started on a tour ot the W est, 
expecting to visit the Portland Exposition and 
other points of interest along the coast. llu > 
will be at home in Winslow after October b>. 



the Bullock Electric Manufacturing Company, 
in Cincinnati, had a K. S. A. C. reunion a 
short time ago. 

"What is a plain and simple direction to 
ueaven?" asked a yonng man of the bishop of 
London. Wisely and well the bishop answered 
"Turn to the right, and go ahead.'' Ex. 



HUH] 




1 



R£U££1?; 



~24q#r. ^jVu^fc-.V' 3 ^ 



Buys a $ 1 .00 

Sanford & Bennett 



Fountain 
Pen 



A bso ] utely 
On ariinteed 
UK CiOlrt Pen 
in four imrts. 
Best rubber 
matetiiil 

ORDER 
TO-DAY 



-Call on or see- 



Jno. B. 

Peterson 

GENERAL AGENT 



Agents Wanted! 



68 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



I JOHN COONS c*cours5£ i 

! Headquarters for Uniforms 

f See our $15 hand'tuilored outfit 3£ 3£ Beats 'em all 

i MAKE OUR STORE TAILOR AND SHOEMAKER THE BIG NEW a 

J YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT YOUR SERVICE CLOTHING HOUSE J 



Additional Local 
New and 2cW bikes.— Frost & Davis. 
Th'» emolment up to October 1 was 1103. 

General sporting g-oods. — Frost & Davis. 

The Library roof is receiving a new coat of 
paint. 

Did you salute and congratulate ''Son John?'* 
It is lime. 



Fine line of Silk Cinbrellas at Askren's jew- 
elry store. 

Did you burn your hand on the first problem 
in blacksmithing? 

Kxpt'i-t watch and jewelry repairing.— As- 
kren, the jeweler. 

Cadet Lttpfer will form the battalion this 
year. His title will 1m-, Jus. A. Lupfer. Cadet 
1st. Lieut, and Battalion Adjutant. 






5 



i 



WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 

ROBERTS & OTTOWA 

CLOTHIERS 

MANHATTAN, - KANSAS 

WE WANT TO KNOW YOU 






i 

i 
i 



ftAAWi^ftftfmnWblAWtfWVWWrV^AAArb r tAAAy ^ VW » VWl W 



FOOTBALL GOODS 

We Carry a Complete Line of Football Goods and Invite Comparison of Prices 

DRAWING INSTRUMENTS 

Deitzgen* Instruments from $1.75 to $21.50 per set. Higgins' Ink, Drawing 
Paper, Curves, Triangles, etc. Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

Cet our prices, we can save you money. Students always welcome 



Anderson's Bookstore, 



308 1-2 

Poyntz Avenue 



Mm m um m— i m mi— 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

227 Poynti Avenue 




Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

,- MANUFACTURERS OF — . ^ 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators. 
Safety Corn Harvesters, Little Wonder Churns, 
Perfection Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps, Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. Fhone ft. 

Manhattan, Kan. 706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year, 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Ovmr Union National Bank. 



rw * DODGE BOARDING CLUB 

BOARD and ROOHS 

One Block East of Main 
Entrance. 

Mrs. S. V. Dodge - 1129 Vattler St. 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C R. L 8r P. Ry« 

Geo. T. Fielding & Sons. 



SEEDS 



Kings 

Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Office 113*15 N. Second St. 



The Midland Home 

BOARD and ROOMS 

Rates Reasonable. I 1 04 Moro St. 
Addrew or *ee C. L. Evans, Manhattan, Kan. 



Homemade 

Candies 



We Lead, 
Olhers Follow 



Special Rates to Students, 



Work Called For and 
Promp:1y Deliver*! 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE & BELL, Props. 



411 Poynti Avenue, 



Fhonc /'i 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

£1 ENGEL BROTHERS 



AMingham & Beattie 

DEALERS /W 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pin*. Watch & Jewelry Repairing: 



PROFESSION A L. 



DR. G. A. CIMSE, DENTIST. 



•M years ol continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. McKBE, DKNTI9T. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building. Wg&to* 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Offlce 66: Res. Bit 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Buildinji. Fine 
S?ld work a specialty. Special price to College students. 



Res Phone. Colt 30H Res, Phone. Cave I » 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 803 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



70 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 




We Make Photographs 

Opposite Carnegie Library 



Come and See 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

MEAT, V EGETAB LES, Etc. 

PHONE 



33 



E B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 

21» Poyntz Ave., Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street. In Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildlnir. 

Porcelain bath tuts, fine Ilnectg*rsmn4 toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salarv assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a posit urn. Largest system 
Si telegraph schools in America. * Kn- 
dorsad by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in «l<<nmml. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O.. Buffalo, U, Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, ("a I. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz p. c. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 
the Wagons. - _ Phone ,„ 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

fl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X, X 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO, 



■ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



71 




EYE 



AND 



EAR 
INFIRMARY 



All kinds of Eye Diseases, surgi- 
cal or otherwise, are treated in the 
latest and most scientific manner. 

IF m A3 3E 3 ARE NEEDED the vision should he tested by the latest and most approved methods. 
Over smo prescriptions are on file at the inlirmary of -efractive eases in Central Kansas, that have been ae- 
SS^^t3lSSS»» No better work can be done in this particular in Kansas City or Chicago 
g££5 are made for 'each case after the examination; and are made to suit the eyes and to look just ritfht 
on the face, Where the eyes are concerned it pays to have the bent. 



C 



S. P. ROSS, M. P. J 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



A 



Students' Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, - - Steward. 



72 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 







L 



We make all our own 



Candi 



les 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. :: :: 




All kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 
Right. :: » 



1 



F 



HI 1 Tl ta 1 n • Ever y tnin g Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
/mi turn . ]CE CREAM S oDAS. 







| THE STAR GROCERY CO. I 

I =JQHN PURCELL ■ 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 

327 P OYNTZ AVE. , 
m Telephone No. .34. 



We D eMver_Good8 Promptly y A 
to Any Part of the City . ~. 




ttOCOU 



College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections..! 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 



. - 




i 



150,000 DAIRY FARMERS 

ARE GOING TO BE ADDED TO THE BIG ARMY OP 
MORE THAN SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND USERS OF 

DE LAVAL 

CREAfl SEPARATORS 

DURING THE YEAR 1905 



The all-important profit-earn- 
ing, time-saving need of the 
Cream Separator is now univer- 
sally recognized by every one. 
As between different separa- 
tors the De Laval is the original, 
and has for twenty-five years led 
in centrifugal separation. 
Would-be imitating machines 
simply utilize the construction 
which expired De Laval patents 
leave free to them. New patents 
still protect modern improve- 
ments. 

The St. Louis Exposition 
gave the Grand Prize {very 
highest award) to the De Laval 
Separators and three Grand and 
Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors 
and improvers, while the Grand 
Prize and Gold Medal butter ex- 
hibits were all De Laval made. 







Randolph and Canal 8t», 
Chicago 




m DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



yq j j M - ^w&fQ g piuwJt 



•w*n^Pt rt *^****w^T!? 



1 



IMMMMSIfti 



■ 




fc ^*V.l* _ ^* ■_ t* Vs"^* L 



S. ELLIOT 



ft. 




WE SELL the best Uniforms (or the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 



Our large experience in handling student trade dur 



many 
X 



MM 
yean enables us to meet their wants exactly. X 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE, a MANHATTAN, KAN. 



JUST IN 






Hfc ' 



* 

* 



i 



1 

* 

% 

i 

x 

* 



An Immense Line of ladies' Back and Side 
Combs, New Styles in Silk and Leather Belts, 
Plain and Fancy Handkerchiefs, Late Shapes in 
Bags, Lace and Embroidered Stocks and Turnover 
Collars, Novelties in Brooches, etc. 

Remember us for College Supplies, Station- 
ery, Souvenir Goods and Photo Goods including 
Sensitized Postal Cards. 



THE BIG RACKET 



C. B. HARRISON, 



***************** * **** * *** 




PROP. 






\ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



78 






r 



r 



I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



We make all our own 



I 



Candi 



l 



les 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. " " 




All kinds of 



Ice C 



OySters. 



ce ^ream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 
Right. :: :: 



l 



I 




Students' Co-operative Bookstore. 

Colleg e Text -Books. 

Drawing Instrument, Drawing Paper, Pen, Pencil, Table*, Note-Book, Writing Paper, AH College Sopplie, 

Second-Hand Books bought and sold. 

.WATERMAN'S IDE AL FOUNTAIN PEN. J 




* The College Grocery and Meat Market. I 






Dealer In 



Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



We deliver £ 
goods promptly A 

i 



« 1116 MoroSt. 

Lm>n , . . .. ..i 7 . 7.;.'. . M .i i ■ ■ 



74 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-'Goods Room, 

With Five Stores under one 

roof, we can supply you with 

about everything you need. We 

have plenty of room to make it 

easy for you todo your shopping. 

New Belts,, . 25c to *l 

New Leather Hand-Bags 

• • 25c to *2 

New Side Combs 10c to 25c 

New Shirt-Waist Sets, 25c to 50c 

Japanese Pillow Tops 25c 

26-inch Black Parasol JWc 

Black Hose 10c, 15c. 25c, 50c 



Ready-to-wear Parlor, 

We are showing all the 

new things in Tailor- 
made Suits, Dress Skirts, 
Underskirts in Muslin 
or Mercerized, Corset 
Covers in Muslin, and 
the knitted ones. Ladies' 
and Misses' Caps, etc. 

Hardware Room, 

Elite Enamel Ware, imported 
■from Austria. Something 
new in color. 80c to $2.25. 
Stoves— a nice line for you to 
select from at the lowest 
prices. 



Shoe 
Department, 

Our Shoes for fall and 
winter are here, you can 
get what you want in 
Footwear. Gymna- 
sium Slippers a 
specialty. 



Grocery Room, 

See us for pure goods 
at popular prices. 



We deliver *oods promptly to any part of the city. ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. JY A 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



LADIES' 

ATHLETIC SHOES 

x 

And all other 
kinds. We make 
a specialty o f 
good servlcahle 
shoes for College 
wear. A large 
stock of dress 
shoes, rubbers, 
polishes, etc. 

See our Shoe Maker for repairs 




226 E. L. Knost man 



J 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
he Students Orlnz 
Agricultural College 



MottorbetEveiyOne Cultivate His Oujb Genias. 



VoixtmeXI. 



Manhattan, Kan., October 12, 1905. 



Number 5 



K. S. A. C. 2% Ottawa 

Just about sundown last Saturday evening 
a very noisy and a very happy crowd of root- 
ers left Athletic park and walked slowly away 
from the scene of the afternoon's victory. They 
went there with confidence and hope-confi- 
dent that our boys would win and hoping that 
they would do it by a large score. They left 
with their hopes realized beyond their expecta- 
tions, for K. S. A. C. had won from Ottowa 
University in the first football game of the 
season by a score of 29 to 0. 

For the first game of the season our men 
showed up remarkably well. The game showed 
us what some of our new players can do, ana 
when we think that we have other men, just as 
good, who did not get into the game we can t 
help but feel hopeful. There are still a few 
weak places on the team, but a week's coach ng 
will fix up those places, and the team tfcrt 
faces Washburn next Saturday will be an 

right in every way. , 

We cannot mention every man who did good 
work, but a few words of commendation may 
not be out of place: Our entire back field 
played fine ball. They start quick ly go tart, 
hit the line hard, and seldom fail * gam. 
Russel Cave played his first game for he Col 
lege, and he did exceedingly well. Kuk, «j 
strom, Scholz, and Mallon were ^H^ 
and they were in it hard. ^^TJlTl 
a good game at quarter; he uses his head t a 1 
times and helps to keep the new men cool- 
The line held well and charged hard- fcvej 
man did his best and showed the proper spirit 
For Ottawa, Rishel and Gates p ayed ast 
and hard. Had the entire team played ^ like 
these two, the score might have been .mailer. 
Masters, the quarter-back, is a good player, 
but his language resembles too ****** 
Hicks of last year's K. U. team. A little less 



emphasis and a little more care in the selection 
of his words would he appreciated hy his op- 

P °The t game was, perhaps, a little too rough, 
but much of the roughness was due to careless- 
ness Too much time was taken out for rag- 
chewing" and other things, and Ottawa played 
off-side altogether too much. However, the 
game was interesting and the score was satis- 
factory, so we are happy. 

FIRST HALF. 

Ottawa kicked thirty yards to Montgomery, 
but somebody was off-side, so the ba was 
taken back and kicked again. This tone U went 
thirty-five yards to B. Cave, who returned t» 
thirteen yards More being downed On the 
first plav Nystrom tried an end run and made 
seven yards Kirk's run around the other end 
nelted ri» while Schol. hit the line for four 
CZ Ot awa here played off-side, but they 
were not penalized. Kirk, Nystrom and Schol/. 
burked the line for a total of fourteen yards, 
and B. Cave went around the end for two more. 
* On the next play the Ottawa line held; our 
bovs fumbled, but Kirk fell on the ball. Can 
n £,,ham punted, but the ball was stopped, 
Z% was in Ottawa's possession on her forty- 
v"rd line. Rishel, Masters and Wert all 
tried to advance the ball, but the College line 
SeW like a stone wall and the ball was los on 
Sown, Nystrom took advantage of a hole 
through uckle and gained a yard. Ottawa 
„l«ved olf-side again and lost five yards as a 
S Ihey lost another live on Kirk's Une 

buck, and Nystrom increased the loss oy a 
K ain through the right of the line 
The *ains were steady here, but Kirk was not 

£T?E angered Ottawa so they hel d or 
three downs and got possession oi 



76 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Entered at the postrofflce at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
. Single copies, five cents. 



F. A. Kienb. '06 Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hkim. '06 Business Manager 

E. C. Far rah. W Literary Editor 

G. C. Kahl.*07 Local Editor 

Mattie Pittman. '06 Exchange Editor 

Carrol Walkek. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. '07 Subscription Manager 

L. E. Gaston, '08' a _ ,_.,. 

Minnie Ire '07 i Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet. *04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen. '08 Reporter 



AH orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chiefs hook not late* 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manajrer. 



Manhattan, Kan., Oct. 12, 1905. 



K. S. A. C, 2fl; Ottawa, 0. This score shows 
that the College team has heen doing- hard work 
in the two weeks of practice that they have had 
this fall. We are pleased with the playing 
done hy the boys and with almost every other 
incident of the game. The crowd was large 
and with a fair proportion of ladies. Enthusi- 
asm ran high and the support accorded the 
team was better than that given any previous 
team in any past game. When the Rooters 
become better organized and better educated in 
the art of rooting they should do even better 
than in Saturday's game. It is hoped that 
every man will be out to practice this week and 
ready to work to the limit. We can beat 
Washburn next Saturday if every one will put 
the proper spirit into his work. Of all games 
this is the one we should win that, in a measure, 
the large scores that have been run up by them 
in the past may he leveled down. Coach 
Ahearn will spare no pains to have the team 
in shape, aud he should be supported by every 
player and every person in College. Practice 
has been carefully watched by many. Let us 
have double the number out to watch practice 
from now on. If you go out you will learn the 
game and become aquainted with the players, 
and as a result will be better able to follow the 
plays and appreciate the games that are played 
at Athletic Park. 



A little declaration of the aims and purposes 
of the "Rooter's Club" may not be out of 
place in the editorial columns, and by one 
most heartily in sympathy with the work it is 
trying to do. First, the club believes in noise 
and enthusiasm. They wish to antagonize no 
one by their demonstrations, but to gain the 
sympathy of all. If any indiscretion is ob- 
served it results from thoughtlessness and a 
lack of serious purpose. Though not to be en- 
tirely excused, this should be overlooked to a 
degree. The business of supporting our team 
in the best possible way is a serious one and 
all Rooters should enter the work in that frame 
of mind. The question should be present in 
the minds of all at all times, "Does this that I 
am doing compromise the club." The purpose 
of entertaining the visiting teams is a most 
worthy one, for in this way will we spread the 
fame of our College and the knowledge of the 
good feeling and hospitality of its students. 
Above all, in the minds of the Rooters is the 
belief that a movement which binds all to- 
gether in a common cause strengthens and 
makes a man of each individual ; that a win- 
ning team is a mighty factor in making a 
name for its college; and that whatever is 
worth doing is worth doing well. 



A few points on the College lecture course 
should be brought to the attention of society 
members especially, and also to all interested 
in the College. The committee has secured 
nine numbers to be given by the best talent 
that money can buy. At other schools and 
cities the price is usually double what is 
charged for this course. The societies are 
back of the course and, if a shortage develops, 
must make it good. This risk should convince 
all that there is something due them at the end 
of the season. Otherwise there is no rake-off, 
and the course is put on at the lowest possible 
figure. The course is something that no stu- 
dent can afford to miss. All old students will 
back up this statement in word and deed. 
This year half of the board is opened at Wil- 
lard's drug store for the benefit of the towns- 
people. This gives them a chance as good or 
better than the students. Besides getting their 
money's worth from the numbers and having the 
privilege of a beautiful and convenient hall, 
there is to be considered the duty they owe the 
students. One thousand students spending two 
hundred dollars per capita each year bring into 
the town two hundred thousand dollars. Such 
being the case it is hard to understand how 
any business man can turn them down when 
confronted by a movement so worthy of sup- 
port. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



77 



(Continued from page 75) 
They fumbled after Rishel had made four 
yards, and the College again started toward 
the Ottawa goal. Cunningham, Nystrom, Kirk 
and Scholz carried the ball for good gains, 
and Scholz was pushed over for the first touch- 
down. He failed to kick goal, so the score 
stood 5 to 0. 

Scholz kicked off to Rishel, who returned 
the ball five y ards. Three times did the Baptist 
backs try to advance the ball, but their etforts 
only gained three yards, so they lost the ball. 
The College started to work about this time, 
and in three minutes Nystrom carried the ball 
over for the second touchdown. Scholz kicked 
goal, and the score was 11 to 0. 
' After this Ottawa took a brace, and advanced 
the ball twenty -five yards before losing it. 
The College made a short gain and then 
punted to Ottawa's ten-yard line. Twice did 
the visitors fail to gain, and then they tried a 
fake. The runner was downed; the ball was 
fumbled and secured by Gates. With good 
interference he ran fifteen yards, but was 
downed by Cunningham. At this time occurred 
the only accident of the game. In tackling 
Gates, Cunningham was in some way struck 
in the head and rendered unconscious. He 
was unable to finish the game, so Kirk was 
shifted to quarter and Russell Cave went in 
at left half. For the remainder of the half 
the ball was worked back and forth, and when 
time was called it was in Ottawa's possession 
near the center of the field. 

SECOND HALF 

Several changes were made in the College 
line-up at the beginning of the half. Brown 
replaced Oslund at right guard; Scholz went 
to left end and Edelblute to right end; Mallon 
went in at left half and R. Cave was shifted to 

^Scholz kicked off for the College, Edelblute 
tackled the runner, while R. Cave fell on the 
ball, which had been dropped. Both teams 
took turns in fumbling at this time and Ottawa 
was twice penalized for playing off-side, me 
play was rather slow, but a good deal of in- 
terest was shown in an impromptu boxing con- 
test. Ottawa held the College twice, and 
- Scholz tried for a field goal but missed. The 
Baptists got the ball, but fumbled at the fust 
chance. Heinrich here went in at center to re- 
place Whipple. Some more fumbling was done. 
Ottawa lost another five yards, and then Kus- 
. sell Cave bucked through the line for a touch- 
down. Scholz kicked goal, and the score was 

^Ottawa kicked off to Scholz, who walked 
over the visitors and returned the ball fifteen 



yards. The game from now on was rather one- 
sided. Ottowa secured the ball a couple of 
times, but they could make no gains. Kirk, 
Nystrom, Cave and Scholz made gains almost 
at will, and Scholz was sent around the end for 
the fourth touchdown. He kicked the goal af- 
ter kicking out for position. Score, 23 to 0. 

The last touchdown was made by Edelblute 
on a fifty-yard end run. Mallon. Scholz, Cave 
and Kirk' had made gains of from three to ten 
yards, but it remained for Edelblute to make 
the longest run of the day. Scholz kicked the 
goal, making the score 29 to 0. 
' Ottawa kicked forty-five yards to R. Cave, 
but in some way he dodged, went under and 
jumped over most of the visitors and returned 
the ball forty-three yards. The last few min- 
utes was a steady march toward the Ottawa 
goal, our fellows making gains at will. The 
game ended with the ball in possession of the 
College on Ottawa's twenty-five-yard line. Fi- 
nal score: K. S. A. C, 29; Ottawa,0 



OTTAW4 Posttlon, K. S. A. C. 

„ C ..Whipple: Heinrich 

a nrt»~«Vn .7. jt aV Oslund; Brown; Jens 

;l nrte ^ 1 t, G Haptrman 

Woodburn £ [m ...Cooley 

Bright ... £■ ±, ••;• ■ Montgomery 

Carpenter • £ *• Blake; Edelblute 

Wilkinson... « .b Cave; Scholz 

9j£*2Li' i Kv»r' \ 0> .7.7.7 '.'.'. Cunningham ; Kirk 

Masters (CapU - -**• ■ Nystrom 

Wert *•■ V kirk; R. Cave: 

RistieliKing L - H ( MalIon(Capt.> 

Wood r.B ■■ Scholz; B. Cave 

The Horse 

'♦The horse is aoblong animal with fore legs, 
and a head on one end, and a tale on the other. 
The horse can't tauk much, so sometimes he 
savs nay when he means yes. The horse is the 
mtellijentist animal they is eksepting the dog 
and man. Our horse knos more than pa, 'cause 
he wouldn't cross the railroad track in front 
of the train when pa wanted him to. Horses is 
not so fast as oughtomowbesls, but there safer 
'cause they have no boilers to bust and blow 
you to ottoms. Horses can draw wagms and 
kannalboats, but they can't draw piektures. 
Sirkus horses is fine. They can find your hand- 
kerchief when you leave it under a heap of dirt. 
I wisht I oned a sirkus horse to find mine, then 
ma wouldn't scold so much for it's getting lost. 
This is all I kno about horses eksept that in 
SO me places they eat dead horse, an pa says he 
bets their tenderer than tbe porter bowse stake 
our butcher sells for thurty cents a pownd 
Horses is wise. Some horses kno more n most 
men The man who can afford it and don't buy 
a season ticket to the football games amt no 
horse, he's just a plain j ack-as s. -Ex. 

Washburn vs K. S. A. C. next Saturday. 
Come out and help us win. 



?8 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 





iStQS&tP 



— e^--* 



Ask Joe for a cat. 
One, two, three, Hi 



-i! 



Football goods. —Frost & Davis. 

New and 2d^r bikes.— Frost & Davis. 

Ask Archie Huyeke for the latest news. 

General sporting goods.— Frost & Davis. 

Read Askren's ad. on second page of cover. 

Come out Saturday and see Washburn bite 
the dust. 

Are you a Co-op. stockholder? If not, why 
not? * 

Fine line of Silk Umbrellas at Askren's jew- 
elry store. 

Work is progressing rapidly on the addition 
to the boiler-room. . 

Go to Thurston (Earle) for jokes. He has 
four in every pocket. 

Ray Birch, H», went to Concordia last 
Tuesday to judge stock. 

S. V. Smith is carrying a boiled hand. 
Meanness working out? 

c T a e £, C £ me: The y Saw 5 We Conquered. K. 
S. A. C. 2» — Ottawa 0. 

. Myrtle and G rover Kahl enjoyed a visit from 
their grandfather last week. 

The foundry made a run Saturday. Cast- 
ings to the amount of 1800 pounds were turned 
out. 

Any one wishing cats should call on or 
write to the subscription manager of the 

-txEKALD. 

The Webster Society will give a special pro- 
gram in the old chapel October 28. Everybody 
cordially invited. 

Did you see Edelblute make that 50-yard run 
for a touchdown? Watch' him Saturday, in the 
Washburn game. 

A preparatory student has been attending 
the class in bacteriology, thinking it to be 
physical geography. 

Miss Helen Bottomly, '05, who is teaching 
near Clebourne, visited home folk and College 
friends over Sunday. 

R. W. Oakes, apprentice in '02 in the boiler- 
room, is attending College and doing appren- 
tice time in the afternoon. 

Miss Mattie Pitman, '06, has been elected 
president of the Ionian society, to fill the va- 
cancy made by the resignation of Cora Mc- 



We are glad to say that the injuries of Sol. 
Cunningham in the Ottawa game were not as 
serious as at first reported. 

Ansel Strom, short-course student last year, 
passed through Manhattan last Wednesday. 
He visited friends while here. 

Mrs. Calvin left last Friday morning for 
Wakefield, where she gave a lecture before the 
institute which was held there. 

The Heat and Power Department is replacing 
the pump in the pump-house. We are glad to 
have good, cool water once more. 

F. H. Mayer and O. A. Avery went overland 
on bicycles last Saturday to Mr. Mayer's 
home, near Council Grove. They returned 
Monday. 

Coxen treated the HERALD people to a basket 
of apples, Monday, from the "Hort." He 
said he bought them(?). He has a receipt 
for the money. 

Jas. Fields, '03, and Miss Edith Felton, jun- 
ior in '04, spent a few days around College 
last week renewing acquaintances. Mr. Fields 
was best man in the Boys- Ul rich wedding. 

The president and vice-president of the 
Websters gave an informal luncheon at the 
Manhattan Candy Kitchen Saturday evening, 
for the officers of the Webster Society. 

Miss L. Alma Ise. of Chapman, instructor 
in German in the Dickinson County High 
School, visited Manhattan friends and the 
College from Saturday p. m. until Monday 
evening. 

An effort was made by Washburn to have 
next Saturday's game transferred to Topeka on 
account of the larger gate receipts. This will 
not be done, however, for the attendance here 
is fully satisfactory. 

Just five hundred season football tickets 
were sold before the first game. It is hoped 
that the remainder of the six hundred will go 
before the Washburn game. The total attend- 
ance at Saturday's game was over seven hun- 
dred. 

Miss Effle Adams, first-year, was obliged "to 
return to her home inOsawkie last week, owin»' 
to illness which has since developed into ty- 
phoid fever. She was accompanied by her 
brother Harvey, who had been visiting in 
Manhattan. e 

While Harold Amos was watching- the P O 
P. parade last week in Kansas City, he 
thought it best to hold his chum by the hand. 
Reaching down he grabbed a hand, onlv to find 
out a half hour later that he was holding- a 
hand of a young lady. The lady was mistaken 
m the hold, also. 

The College Band returned last Wednesday 
from their trip, to Kansas City, where they 
played in the Priests of Pallas parade. Thirtv 
members went on the trip and all had a good 
time The band was third in the parade and 
called forth much favorable comment both by 
their appearance and their playing. It may 
appear strange to outsiders, but the fact is that 
the band at present, after only two weeks' prac- 
tice is better than it was last year at the end of 
the tall term. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



79 



(Tune: 



The Rooters' Song 

" Marching Through Gleorfrfa.") 



Brine the Roval Purple out and ioin a Jolly SOD*. 
Stnfl It with a spirit that will help the team alone. 
Sine it as they rush the*tUl and ours will be the game, 
For they are fighting for victory. 

CHORUS 

Hurrah' Hurrah! They rush the ball along. 
Hurrah' Hurrah! They take it round the end; 
Touchdowns thev will make and goals will raise the score. 
For they are fighting for victory. 

Speedy are the backs to-day and strong the line is formed. 
Noblv 'do they light to win for K. A. C. to-day; 
Rushes they will make and runs that bring the gains. 
For they are lighting for victory.- Chorus. 

— A. D. Hoixoway, 07. 



Carrol Walker is practicing football now. 
Laura Lyman went to the Fort last Monday. 
The P F C a 's were up at 4 a.m. Monday. (?) 
Bicycles and bicycle sundries.— Frost & Da- 
vis. 

Pres. E. R. Nichols was in Topeka last 
week. 

Bicycle and general repair shop.— Frost & 
Davis. 

Expert watch and jewelry repairing.— As- 
kren, the jeweler. 

The "Hort" crushed rock Monday for Con- 
tractor Bennett. 

Guy Yerkes, '06, has charge of a class in 
"Hort" industrial. 

Arthur Rhodes, '04, was around College a 
few days last week. 

Fine watch and jewelry repairing a specialty. 
— Askren, the jeweler. 

Chas. Randle, of Bala, visited hi*s sister and 
old College friends last Sunday. 

Clyde Lewis, junior last year, is in town for 
a visit with friends and relatives. 

Beulah Pitman chaperoned a high school 
crowd to Eureka Lake last Thursday. 

The "Hort" has dug its potato crop. One 
variety went as high as 290 bushels per acre. 

C. H. Paine had the misfortune to have his 

right arm broken at football practice Monday. 

See our subscription manager and pay up 

your subscription. The Herald needs the 

money. 

Miss Gussie McCormiek, sophomore '05, is 
teaching school at the Three Mile district, in 
Riley county. 

Dr. M. Jeannette Stockton, £**£**£« #£ 
sician, 113 south Third street. Consultation 
free. Phone 344. 

Wardie Crofut, sophomore in '05, .has left 
for Wisconsin, where he has a position with 
the Milwaukee Railroad. 

Bunn Thurston would like to tell you why a 
share in the Students Co-operative Associa- 
tion is a good investment. 

Lenord Haggman, brother of A. L. Hagg- 
maTleft guardon the football team, visited 
his brother and friends last week. 



W. H. Wagner and wife of Russell Springs, 
Kan., visited the College Monday. His ex- 
pression of opinion was most favorable. 

Ottawa was just a little surprised. Zee! 
They complimented the Rooters' Club and 
wished they had as much noise when they play 
at home. 

Coach Ahearn was away Monday, celebra- 
ting the victory over Ottawa. We did not 
learn whether he went to Junction City or Kan- 
sas City. 

S. I. Wilkin, a former student, now of 
Stockton, Kan., writes that his father died 
September 29, in San Luis Obispo, Cal., in his 
seventy -seventh year. 

Some new suits have been ordered for the 
football team. Union suits have been ordered 
for the backs, and some new jerseys and jack- 
ets for the line men. 

The lecture course drawing board will be 
opened Friday, at 3 p.m. The west half will be 
at the Co-op. bookstore and the east half at 
Willard's drug-store. 

JRev. O. B. Thurston, Congregational church, 
will preach the annual sermon on athletics next 
Sunday evening. Subject, "The Young Man 
and Football. ' ' Special music. 

Ask to see our $1.50 commercial pen, a 
exade higher than our 75-cent pen. Equal to 
any $2.50 pen for only S1.00.-J. B. Peterson, 
general agent, 830 Moro street. 
' Henry Rrinkman, '07, has just returned to 
resume' his work in College. He was so busy 
doing carpenter work at Emporia that he could 
not leave it until after October 1. 

Percy Roberts made a "hit" while on his way 
to Kansas City with the band last week. The 
other boys were envious and cast longing eyes 
Sward a vacant seat, but Percy was the only 
one who could sit there. 

Professor Dickens was at Hutchinson the 
first of the week looking at the oil roads in 
?hat part of the State. The Government is go- 
ing to oil the road from the main gate to the 
city park. Let the good work continue. 

Tester Ramsey's brother, N. F. Ramsey, 
wh^ 5w*5£2 from West Point last June left 
Sa£ Francisco last Thursday on the transport 
-Thomas" enroute to Manila, P. L, where > ne 
will join the Ninth Infantry, to which he has 
been assigned. 

Assistant Wheeler was at &^gfi££ 
week in the capacity of a -judge. His line is 
beef and dairy c'attle, but he is rapn^y devel- 
oinntf a capacity in another direction. Mr. 
Wheeler officiated at a baby show. He is at 
home now and is feeling better. 

Those students who attended the Royal 
Stock Show at Kansas City this week were: 
C A Gilkinson, D. H. Gripton, Harry Oman. 
r Tambert L. E. Hazen. A. Conner W.B. 
Schroeder, W \3. Brown, Robert Gilbert W. 
F W^kins, H. R. Reed, J. N Bealev, M. L. 
Walters , M R. Shuler, H. J. Bottom!* E. E. 
GV>enouW>, M. D. Snodgrass, J. M, Ryan, C. 
S Jones, F. L. Williams. The boys returned 
Wednesday. 



< . • 



80 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



! JOHN COONS oFcouigsg i 



Headquarters for Uniforms 

See our $15 hand^tailored outfit X X Beats 'em all 



i 



i MAKE OUR STORE TAILOR AND SHOI 

I YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT YOUR SERVICE 



TAILOR AND SHOEMAKER THE BIG NEW 

CLOTHING HOUSE 



Mis 3 Liora Perry will assist Miss Augspurger 
in teaching-piano music. 

Elmer Samson, junior last year, Stopped in 
Manhattan a couple of days last week. 

The Methodists have just celebrated the fifti- 
eth a university of their church. Bishop Ham- 
ilton was the chief speaker. The sermon Sun- 
day evening was exceptionally good. 

The date of the football game with St. 
Mary's has been changed from Saturday, Oc- 
tober 28 to Monday, October 30. By this ar- 
rangement the game can be called at 2 o'clock 
and finished before dark. 

Professor Hamilton recently received a letter 
from Wm. Buckley which contained five dol- 
lars for the Athletic association. Buckley said, 

r„ am sorrv I can not give more. I hope you 
will have a successful football team." This 
is an example which others may well follow. 

Some of the boarding clubs have been in- 
vaded with students and others who, in order 
to be sure of the quality and quanity of the 
fare, have been "samplin' around" for a week 
or two. They generally get one sample a dav, 
making it of sufficient size to do for twentv-four 
hours. 




Miss Edith Felton visited College friends 
lastweekand attended the Ul rich-Boys wedding. 

G. H. Wilson. '05, says he is enjoying life 
on the farm near W infield, applying' some of 
the scientific principles learned while at K. S. 
A. C. 

Evan Kernohan, senior in '04, is a partner 
in a large general store at Beverly, Kan. 
Helen Kernohan, '04, is a bookkeeper and 
clerk in the same establishment. 

N. L. Towne, '04, is back at his work as 
manager of a grain elevator near Omaha, Neb., 
after a lay-off of nine weeks with the typhoid 
fever. 

S. E. Mori an, '04, has had to give up his 
work at the zinc mines near Denver and is now 
at his home. His many friends will be sorry 
to learn of his sickness. 

Mr. Wesley Fryhofer, '05, writes that he has 
received an appointment to teach butter making 
and dairying in the short course at Amherst, 
Mass. His work will begin after the holidays. 



V^WW^tfWWWWWWtfWWWWWWl 



FOOTBALL GOODS 

We^Cany a Complete line of Foot b all Goods an d Invite Comparison of Prices 

DRAWIMGTivfsTRUMENTS 

Deitzgen Instruments from $1.75 to $21.50 per set. Higgins' Ink, Drawing 
faper, Curves, Triangles, etc. Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

Cet our prices, we can save you money. Students always welcome 



And 



erson's Bookstore, 



308 1-2 
Poyntz Avenue 



WiM ■ ■ *~rv\nnr\nmiu 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



81 



A. E. Oman, '00, passed through Manhattan 
last" Saturday on his way to Leonard ville. 
Mr. Oman is employed in the U. S. Bureau of 
Forestry and was stationed at Halsey, Neh., 
during the summer. After visiting with home 
folk for a few days, he will go to Yale to re- 
sume his studies in Forestry. 

Josephine Edwards, '05, kindly remembered 
us with the news that her brother, L. S. Ed- 
wards, '03, was married, Oetober S, to Miss 
Cora B. Glasscock, of Oswego, Kan. Miss 
Glasscock has been a teacher in the city schools 
there for several years. Mr. Edwards is still 
working on the Deming ranch, and the place he 
first filled while there is now occupied by Harry 
Urn burger, '05. 

Married, October 4, at the home of the bride's 
mother, Miss Dovie Ulrich, '03, to Mr. W m. 
Boys, '04, Miss Lois Failyer and Mr. James 
Field, '03, acting as bridesmaid and best man. 
The ceremony occurred at 8:30 P. M., and was 
witnessed by about forty relatives and friends, 
after which 'dainty refreshments were served in 
two courses. Mr. and Mrs. Boys left Saturday 
morning for Lee's Summit, Mo., where Mr. 
Boys is engaged in farming. 



AUingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

r 

FRESH and SALT MEAT5 and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J.Q.A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 




Kings 

Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DKNTIST. 

Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building gjg***' 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones. Office Bo, Kes, w. 



Home/made 

Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



34 years of continuous practice should be convince for 
highest skill and perfection. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

*Z ENGEL BROTHERS 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

^ MANUFACTURERS OF ==^ 

Sweep and Power Peed Mills. Disc Cultivators, ' 
Safely Corn Harvesters, Little Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights, Chimney Caps, Structural I«>h Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. rnone o. 

Manhattan, Kan. 706 H. Third Street. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOU, DENTIST. 

Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building F^e 
"old work a specialty. Special price to College stuaents. 



Res. Phone. Colt B08 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office In Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Over Union National Bank. ^^^ 



TM DODGE BOARDING CLUB 

BOARD and ROOriS 

One Block East of Main 
Entrance. 

Mrs. S. V. Dodge - 1129 Vattler St. 

THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on G R. I. & P. Ry- 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons. 



SEEDS 



Office 11345 N. Second St. 



The Midland Home 

BOARD and ROOMS 

Rates Reasonable. 1 1 04 Moro St 

C. L. Evans, Manhattan, Kan. 



Address or see 



82 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 



n 


.^rtVtsni^^ ■**' 




•118 


k : 2. 


■"ij 


4 


"#^ 


T** 1 - 


""^"vsy 




^_ f - 


— — . , 







We Make Photographs 

Opposite Carnegie Library 



Come and See 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 



33 



R B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 

219 Poyntz Ave, Manhattan, Kan. 



J.W.BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank BuildiDK. . . , 

Porcelain bath tabs, tine tine cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until vou have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y, Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP f Prop, 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 
the Wagons. - . Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X X 

W, M. STINGLEY & CO, 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



83 



r 



AT 



POYNTZ 
AVE. 



THE 



EYE 



AND 



I 




EAR 
I INFIRMARY 



/7T\\S 

All kinds of E.ve Diseases, surgi- 
cal or otherwise, are treated in the 
latest and most scientific manner. 

ir ri«««c< are NEEDED the vision should he tested by the latest and most approved methods. 
Ovfr ^?reTcrip\ionH are on Hie al the infirmary of -ef ractive cases in Central Kansas, that have been ac- 
vlrlteYv fitted l with glasses No better work can be done in this particular in Kansas^ City or Chicago. 
Sla^es^emud* 1 for each case after the examination; and are made jto suit the eyes and to look just right 
on the face. Where the eyes are concerned it pays to have tfte nest. 



v., 



IVU lb (flljn M.F mm^TV ■■■■■ mv«*w 

S. D. ROSS, M. D. , 



fefl 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, PROP. 



_ * » »• -•'*'»»■• 



Students' Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, - - Steward. 



V 

T 



84 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



+ <+r^' 



', 



SHOES 



! 



Of Style 

& Service 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT < 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 

Roberts & Ottowa (Ss^ 




THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

JOHN PURCELLa 



> • 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 

■ 327 POYNTZ AVE. 
jjjs Telephone No. 34. 



We D eliver Goods Promptly 
to Any Part of the CityTTT'. 



* * *■ i ^ . T r *Si 



RS£ 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

P HOTOS 

227 Poyntz Avenue 




Special Rates to Students. 



Work Oiled For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 

n/"ivi c a. am > n m 



BOYLE fir BELL, Props. 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 



411 Poyntz Avenue. 



Phone 74 



College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOAR D 

M o^ I f^ and c L i inches ' Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections.! 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 



fi 



* 

&<&'/<?> 



tr 



%\xz Students' Herald 



i r ' 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College JC 2£ 





\ 



l 



i -. 



! 



II 



... 



Keuffel & Esser Co 

* OF* NEK YORK * 
813 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo- 



drawing 
instruments 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS LAX 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



• ' " '; J^S^i V, M W, VfiJ. 






We Extend to 

Every Student 



A cordial Invitation to visit our store. 
We nave tbe largest, newest, up-to- 
date stock of JEWELRY In Man- 
hattan, 

OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY 

Repairing Department Is one of the 
best equipped shops In Kansas, 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Is managed by an expert optician, 
who makes a specialty of curing 
Headaches, Nervousness, Dizziness, 
Pains In Eyeballs caused from defec- 
tive eyesight. 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED 

With any of these defects, we guar- 
antee to cure or it costs you nothing. 



ASKREN 

...The Jeweler and Optician.... 



Bilger's Hack 

AND 

Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



85 



r 



I 



I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



We make all our own 



Candi 



les 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. :: :: 




All kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 



! 



Oyfters. Ri 8 ht 



I 




r 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore. 



College Text-Books. 



EWing |MM Dr.win 8 P.p.r. ft» Pencil.. T.ble... N0.-B00U WriU»g Pbpr. All C*» Suppl». 

Second- Hand Books bought and sold. 



V. 



WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN, j 




I The College Grocery and Meat Market. 



Dealer In 






Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



1 



1 1 16 Moro St. 
Phone 227 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



a 

I 

We deliver * 
goods promptly & 

J I 



W^, W w«w«««"«"»"* wwwwwwww, * WWWWW * 



= 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 

■ 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




There are few words in 
use which have the same 
interest to ladies as the 
two short words 



New 
Goods 



We now show the fall 
and winter line of Dress 
Fabrics, Linings, etc., and 
the new HOSE for Ladies, 
Misses, and Children. 
The brand Y.. S. H. we 
carry stands the test of 



long wear, and we send 
these goods out confident 
that you will be satisfied 
when you come to use 
them. Four popular 
grades, 10c, 15c, 25c and 
50c. 



Shoe Department. 

Shoes that fit, keep their 
shape, and WEAR well. 
Gymnasium Slippers a 
specialty. 



Readyvto/wear Parlor, 
Ready-made Suits, 

Skirts, Underskirts, 

Wrappers, etc. 

Hardware Room, 

Stoves and Ranges — 
Everything in Hardware. 



Groceries 

Pure wholesome and 
moderate in price. 



We deliver tfoods promptly to any part of the city. Ladles' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc*. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 

"Courtney's Full- Vamp Shoes are Good 

Enough for Me." 



SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS 4. COMPANY 




You can 

get everything in 

Clothing 



at 



cormorr i»s mr 

IK HOUSE OF RTPEllOn 



KNOSTMAN'S 

Underwear, 

Shoes, 

Hats 

and 

the greatest 

Suits & Overcoats 

ever 

seen in 

Manhattan 



3 rooms and 3 tailors at 
your service 



-ALSO A SHOEMAKER- 




Published 
Each Thursday Br 
Jhe Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorbecBvejy One Cultivate His Quun Genius. 



VotajmeXI. 



Manhattan, Kan., October 19, 1905. 



Number 6 



Washburn Outplayed 

"K. S. A. C. outplayed Washburn more 
than two to one." This was the opinion of al- 
most every one of the eight hundred people that 
attended the football game at Athletic Park 
last Saturday. Even Coach Outland, of Wash- 
burn, admitted that our boys played the better 
game. The score of 12 to 5 in favor of Wash- 
burn does not l>ear out the above statements, 
but then figures are not always true. To peo- 
ple who did not see the game, such remarks 
may sound strange, so here are a few facts in 
regard to it: K. S, A. C by hard, clean play- 
ing, gained two hundred seven yards during 
the game. Washburn gained only eighty-three. 
K. S. A. C. carried the ball across the field, by 
straight football, three times, while Washburn 
did this only once. The above figures do not 
include gains made on fumbles, in returning ( 
punts or kick-offs, or on penalties. 

In team work our boys were far superior to 
the visitors. They showed great improvement 
over their work in the first game. The line 
held better and charged more rapidly. The 
backs played together and played fast. When 
a man was tackled, some one was there to help 
him along. The men deserve great credit for 
their perseverance and hard work, but the man 
who deserves the most credit is Coach Ahearn. 
Much credit is also due the Rooters' Club and 
the band for their support. Coach Outland re- 
marked: "That Rooters' Club is certainly a 
great help to your team." 

In individual playing, it is hard to make a 
comparison. Captain Hill, one of the best 
players on the visiting team, played tackle 
against Cooley, yet he made no gains.^ Hill 
played a good game at all times, hut Cooley 
was easily his equal. None of the rest of the 
Washburn linemen showed up particularly well, 
but Millice at half and Williams at full did 



good work. Millice was especially good in 
backing up the line on tackle bucks. For the 
College, every man did good work, Whipple, 
Brown and Ostlund played football for the sec- 
ond time and showed great improvement. 
Whipple is developing into a good center. 
His passes were faultless and lie held his man 
easily. Haggman, who went in at guard in 
the second half, played all over his opponent. 
Montgomery and Walker had things all their 
own way at" left tackle and end. They stopped^ 
everything that came that way and made holes 
whenever they were called on. Edelblute at 
right end made some good gains, but be played 
and tackled to high. Blake, who played this 
end the second half, did good work in break- 
ing interference. Kirk at quarter showed ex- 
cellent judgment. He handled the ball rap- 
idly and carefully, and he always helped the 
runner. Every man on our team did his best 
and the entire College is proud of them. If 
there is such a thing as luck, it was certainly 
on the side of Outland's men, for nothing but 
luck saved them from defeat. 

In one respect, the game was not satisfactory. 
Time after time the Washburn men were guilty 
of slugging and neck twisting. Perhaps if our 
boys had used the same tactics the result would 
have been different, but our boys don't play 
that kind of football. 

FIRST HALF 

Washburn took the west goal and K. S. A. 
C. received the kick-off. White kicked forty 
yards to Kchol/.. who returned twelve. Brown, 
the Washburn guard, tackled too high, and as 
a result was almost knocked senseless. Nys- 
trom started things for the College by a two- 
yard gain around the end. Mai Ion and Hchola 
followed with good ga ins on line bucks. Cooley 
was called back and Cunningham and Nystrom 
followed him through for seven yards each. 



1.^ 



88 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



W a sli burn was then penalized fifteen .yards, 
and our boys kept on, up the hill and against 
the wind, making yard after yard. Cunning- 
ham used good judgment in calling the plays, 
and not a single time did the hacks fail to gain. 
Walker and Montgomery tore holes in the 
Washburn line and Mallon, Ny strum and 
Scholz walked through with from one to three 
Washburn men hanging to them. Washburn 
was penalized for dirty playing once again, 
but the penalty was only a few yards. After 
ten minutes' work the hall was on Washburn's 
four-yard line. Scholz was sent through the 
line for two yards but Ik: was tackled by the 
arms and the hall was dropped. Washburn 
got it and punted out of danger. Again the 
march toward the west began, but, after making 
twenty yards, the Washburn line held and 
Scholz punted. The visitors here began to 
ginger up and they made about thirty yards 
before being stopped. Then they pnnted and 
Cunningham returned the hall ten yards. The 
umpire thought he saw some one trip a Wash- 
burn player so lie penalized our team fifteen 
yards, hut he didn't see the Washburn men pile 
up on Sol. after he was down. Edelblute, 
Walker, Ny strum and Scholz all carried the 
hall for good gains, and then Scholz punted. 
Washburn tried a quick line-up, which made ten 
yards. A couple of end runs made them fifteen 
more, and then White was sent through the 
line for ten yards and a touch-down. Goal 
was kicked and the score was : Washburn, ft; 
K. S, A. a, 0. 

Washburn again kicked off to Scholz, who 
returned ten yards. Only one (day was made, 
in which Edelblute made four yards, and then 
time was called. 

SECOND HALF 

In the second half things went entirely our 
way till the last minute of play. A few changes 
were made in our line-up in order to give sev- 
eral more players a chance. Cunningham, 
who had been seeing double since being walked 
on, was replaced by Kirk. Uussel Cave went 
in at right half, Blake at right end, and Hagg- 
man at left guard. Scholz kicked off for thirty- 
five yards and Washburn returned five. Then 
they found that they were playing against a 
better team. They tried to go through the line, 
but they could not gain. They tried an end 
run and lost ground. Finally, after getting 
four downs, they were forced to punt. The 
College made a few yards' gain and then Scholz 
punted. Washburn called their right tackle 
back and he started through the line, but 
Cuoley and Walker pushed him back and the 
visiturs had nine yards to go instead of five. 
This they could not do, so the College took the 



hall and in six plays Blake, Cave, Mallon and 
Scholz gained thirty yards. The ball was 
fumbled and w.»nt out of bounds, but Kirk fell 
on it. It was carried in and on the next play 
Scholz was sent through tackle for ten yards 
and a touch-down. The goal was missed and 
the score stood fi to «i. 

From this time the game was a succession of 
hurdles, line bucks, and end runs, each of 
which gained from one to twelve yards. Only 
once did Washburn get the ball, and at tin 
first attempt to advance it Cave downed tin 
runner and Cooley fell on the ball, which was 
fumbled. The College had the ball on the vis- 
itor's twenty-live yard line and only one min- 
ute was left to play. The ends dropped hack 
and Mallon tried for a goal from the field. 
The kick was low, struck our line and hounded 
out on the field. Hill secured the ball and ran 
eighty- five yards for a touch-down just as time 
was called. He kicked goal and the final score 
was: Washburn 12, K. S. A. C. 5. 

The line-up was: 

Washhukn. k. s, .v. 0. 

Piatt: Snattentrer C Whipple 

Ware R. (J Ostlund 

Brown; Piatt L. G Blown; Huwman 

Sharp R. T Coolev 

Hill (Capt.) L. T Montgomery 

B. Tiee R. E Edelhhite; Blake 

Hautrhey L. E Walker 

H. Tiee ...Q Cunningham. Kirk 

Milllce R. H. Nystrom; R. Cave 

White L. H Mallon 

Williams p Scholz (CaptJ 

Officials: Lieutenant Avery and Captain 
( 'auieron. Linesmen: R. Stewart and Farrar. 

Websters 

The Webster Stock Company played to a 
full house Saturday night. All of the musical 
numbers were well given and well received by 
the society. H. O. Caldwell gave a No. 1 dec- 
lamation. Fred Houser was next with a dis- 
cussion on "Hooting." F. W. Caldwell, as- 
sisted by several other Websters, gave a 
"quiz" in parliamentary law. "Banty" Wil- 
liams preached "Passim Moonah's Surmont." 
A "Reporter" that was up to the standard was 
read by Arba Ferris, and after a very inter- 
esting business session we adjourned, j. w. 



lonlans 

Society was called to order shortly after 
1 P. M. by President Mattie Pittman. The 
time of our society was changed on account of 
the football game. 

The opening song was "Lead, Kindly Light," 
Edna Jones pianist. Society was then led in 
devotion by Mary Copley. The first number 
on the program was music by Miss Amos, 
followed by a short but well -rendered recitation 
by Nell Wolf. Ethel Bisby then furnished the 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



89 



society with music. A debate. "Resolved^ That 
national expositions are of benefit to the coun- 
try in which they are held," was next in order. 
Good argument was given on both sides, but 
the judges' decision was in favor of the affirm- 
ative. Ruth Neiman and Bertha Romine de- 
bated affirmatively and Marcia Turner and 
Ina Harold negatively. The last number on 
the program was an excellent "Oracle," 
Odessa Dow. editor. 

On account of important business we ad- 
journed to meet in closed session. m. R. c. 

Y. W. C, A. Notes 

Girls, the convention is coming! Thursday, 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, of this week. 

The ladies of the Congregational church will 
serve a banquet to the visiting delegates Fri- 
day evening at six o'clock in the church par- 
lors. 

Doctor Estey, of Topeka, will have charge of 
the meeting Thursday evening. Miss Radford 
will conduct the Friday evening meeting, and 
Miss Paxson the Saturday evening one. The 
gospel meeting for Sunday afternoon will also 
be under Miss Paxson's charge. No one can 
afford to miss this. 



K. S. A. C. Directory 



Hamps 

The program of the evening was opened by 
the Hamp Quartette singing the College song. 
The debate, "Resolved, That a three-years' 
high-school education or its equivalent should 
be required for entrance at K. S. A. C," was 
debated on the affirmative by Schaffer and 
A. J. Cowles, and on the negative by Ernest 
Adams and McCall. It was decided that we 
should not have this requirement. A cornet 
solo by A. J. Cowles, accompanied by Miss 
Brown, was a pleasant feature of the program. 
Mr. Harry Porter read an exceptionally good 
paper on 'social life at K. S. A. C. Readings 
from K. S. A. C. masterpieces by S. B. Ha an 
were interesting. "The Sheep-skin and the 
Pig-skin," by C. E. Whipple, was exceedingly 
good, and like some of the other numbers was 
out of the ordinary. Pat. Brown told us how 
to succeed as a grafter at K. S. A. C. Cheeney 
criticised. A lively business session followed 
recess. Mr. J. J. Biddison gave us an inter- 
esting talk. ■ 

Education is the knowledge of how to use the 
whole of one's self. Many men use but one or 
two faculties out of the score with which they 
are endowed. A man is educated who knows 
how to make a tool of every faculty-how to 
open it, how to keep it sharp, and how to 
apply it to all practical purposes.- -Henry 
Ward Beedier. 



HAMILTON SOCIETY 

President R. A. Cassell 

Vice-president C. I. Weaver 

Secretary A. D. Holloway 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in North Soci- 
ety Hall. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY 

President F. A. Kiene. Jr 

Vice-president H. R. Heim 

Secretary O. C. Kahl 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in South Soci- 
ety Hall. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY 

President May Harris 

Vice-president Ray Birch 

Secretary J. R- Garver 

Meets in South Society Hall. Saturday. 2:30 p. M. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY 

President W. B, Thurston 

Vice-president E. L. Shattuek 

Secretary Tillie Trunk 

Meets in Franklin Hall. Saturday, at 7:30 p. m. 

EURODELPHIAN SOCIETY 

President Winifred Dalton 

Vice-president Boltne Hanson 

Secretary Louise Fleming 

Meets every Saturday in Franklin Hall, at 2:45 p. M. 

IONIAN SOCIETY 

President Mattie Pittman 

Vice-president Laura Lyman 

Secretary ' Minnie Ise 

Meets in North Society Hall. Saturday, at 2:45 p. ml 

Y. W. C. A. 

President Cora E. McNutt 

Vice-president Helen Inskeep 

Secretary .....Ethel Berry 

General Secretary Miss 1 hayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
South Society Hall. The Home. 017 Manhattan Ave. 

Y. M. C. A. 

President E - c - Farrar 

Vice-president W. R Thurston 

Secretary ,?• r ^ s \ h , ut r luek 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 

8:80 

ROOTERS' CLUB 

Chairman ?• A. Kiene. Jr 

Vice-chairman A. D. Holloway 

Secretary -ttiA£2SS 

Treasurer ■ Fred Lindsey 

Meets at the call of the chairman. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President..... H * &£££ 

Vice-president g. I W^J*? 

Secretary MI - Stauffer 

General Manager Prof. J. O. Hamilton 

Meets at call of the president. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

T>r*wirii»nt •• ■ • Harvey Hn hoard 

Vieepl-esirlent.V.V;.. ^•J?«ft£ 



Meets Monday evening in COO. 



. Mr. Graham 



Better watch your corners. 
Keep kinder lookin' out; 
Or the Faculty, will net you, 
If you don't watch out. 



At Wesley an, Nebraska, all new students are 
required to' sign a pledge at registration time 
stating that they will not join any literary 
society of the university until they have been 
a student for at least three consecutive months. 
The heads of the departments must sign the 
card when the student has satisfied the require- 
ments. This is intended to do away with society 
rushing, which is so common at the beginning 
of the school year. 



90 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Metro: UrCvEHV 
One Cultivate Hi» 
Own Genhm. • + - 

Printed In Collejre Printing Departs 
ment by .student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., assecond- 
class ma tter. 

Subscription rates; One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 



F. A.Kiknk. Jb..'06..... Editor-in-chief 

H. It. Hkim. '06 Business Manager 

E. C. Fahhah. 07 Literary Editor 

(J. C. Kahl. '117 Local Editor 

Mattib Pittman. *06. Exchange Editor 

CAKHOL Walk Kit. '07 Assoc. Business Man aire r 

J. S. Montgomkky. W Subscription Manager 

L. E.OAHTON. 'OH i . _ , „,.. 

MtNNiBlHK. '07 f ■ Assoc. Local Editors 

Eli/,ahbth Swkkt, '04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. C'oxkn. '08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hum* on the editor-in-chief's hook not late* 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manajrer, 

Elizabeth Swekt, '04, alumni editor, will be jjlad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Oct. 1ft, l»0f). 








We announce again in editorial that the 
Knockers' Corner is still in existanee. There 
are a great many things about College that 
will he better for a little friendly criticism, and 
it is the privilege of any one to contribute to 
this column. 



The Herald will he glad to print in its col- 
umns yells and songs appropriate and fitting 
for special or all occasions. We need more 
yells and more song's and any one having the 
necessary ability should contribute something 
along this line. The yells will add spice and 
interest to the games as well as inspire the 
teams to greater efforts. 



Do you know how many pages of advertise- 
ments are running in the Herald? You 
should know and also that a great deal of the 
income which enables the paper to exist comes 
from this source. Do you know that an "ad" 
is the business man's method of asking for 
your patronage? Do you know that the men 
who speak to you thus are the men that are up 



and doing in their business, and the men who 
are broadminded and lil>eral in contributing 
to a cause which is to advance the general good 
of all? These are things to think about, and 
the advertising pages of the Herald should 
not be slighted by its readers. 



Last Saturday evening several of the soci- 
eties had the privilege of hearing the Hamilton 
Quartet sing the College song, "Alma Mater." 
They proved to us that the song and its music 
are lieautiful in combination, and it now re- 
mains for us to learn it and then to sing it 
with spirit on every occasion. In the opinion 
of many the music should be sent off to be ar- 
ranged for the hand and orchestra. With 
these departments familiar with it and leading 
in its presentation we will soon be able to vie 
with other schools in singing College songs. 



There are several things relating to conduct 
on which the editor wishes to express himself. 
If it does no good, it will still do no harm. 
About the church doors on Sunday evenings 
young men are seen to congregate, evidently 
with nt> other purpose than to see the crowds 
and be seen. They seem to put no value on 
the person whose life work is ministry and a 
preparation for the ministry. The personality 
of a student should appeal to them and com- 
mand respect. When Young America passes 
an opportunity to experience the influence that 
radiates from a thoughtful mind, for a few mo- 
ments of idle conversation with a person of 
doubtful character, he is taking the path op- 
posed to advancement, mental and spiritual. 
Another subject shocking to any one of sensi- 
bility is the yelling that goes on in the park 
on Sunday evenings. It is hard to think that 
any student would do this, but it seems that they 
are more or less active in it. Here, where the 
student is away from home, where he will not 
be. easily excused, and where he should have 
the respect of every one and the sympathy of 
all, he should he doubly careful not to com- 
promise himself or the student body of which 
he is a part. These are things that should re- 
ceive serious thought. A "don't care attitude" 
is a wrong one, will lead to wrong doing, and 
can make no friends. 



The attention of contributors to the columns 
of the Herald is called to the paragraph in- 
serted just under the list of staff officers on the 
editorial page. It reads: "To insure insertion, 
matter intended for publication should be hung 
on the editor-in-chief's hook not later than 
Monday noon of each week." If this para- 
graph had not an element of truth in it, i 
would not appear in print. To insure a timely 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



91 



edition of the paper copy mast be turned in at 
this time or must be denied space in the col- 
umns. As the TIkralo is trying to do all it 
can possibly do for every other student move- 
ment in College, as well as trying to forge to 
the front -in its own field, it should be assisted 
in every way rather than hampered. Professor 
Rickman says that there is as much work con- 
nected with the " HERALD as is found in the 
edition of any ordinary country weekly. The 
officers have their College work to do and 
should not Vie expected to hunt you up to in- 
form you that something in which you aiv very 
much interested should he published in the 
paper. Again, industrial labor is employed 
from Tuesday morning until Friday night on 
HkkaU) copy, and if your article is coming in 
at all it should come in early that the paper 
may have the henetit of free labor. If you are 
interested in seeing the best college paper in 
the land eminate from K. S. A. C, do not be 
afraid to put your shoulder to the wheel. 

We will be pardoned for addressing the new 
students again as such, for it is probable that 
you will consider yourselves still new students 
when you turn your backs on K. S. A. < '. for 
the last time. Our attention has been called to 
the fact that some have fives up school and 
have gone home: to various Blighting remarks 
and to the homesickness prevalent anions those 
who are away from home and relatives for the 
first time. First of all, young people, your 
college experience is not wholly a preparation 
for the future. It is life worth living, and we 
bey you to enter into it with a spirit and make 
the most of it. Make friends among the stu- 
dents and townspeople, do your best to make 
them firm and fast in the friendship, and when 
you go away you will find these friendships a 
mighty factor in your character building and a 
causefor pleasant memories of college ' days. 
No one can expect college life to be all sun- 
shine and no shadow. Your little difficulties 
look larger, perhaps, because the sympathies 
so freely giveu at home are not evident here. 
But if the clouds are dark, if it rains, your feet 
stick in the mud and people are indifferent to 
you. this is only another reason why you 
should dig your toes in the earth and go it 
alone. So give up thought of ending your 
college career next weak, or at the end of the 
term, but look forward with determination to 
that end which you will finally find to be only 
the beginning of wider and better things. 

Although the score in Saturday's game reg- 
isters a defeat for us. for we consider ourselves 
a part of our football team, we feel that it was 
not a defeat but a great victory. In the mind 



of every fair and impartial observer is the 
conviction that K. S. A. C. outplayed Wash- 
hurn in quality two to one. We will not say 
that our weaknesses were not shown up. for 
they were, and we are glad of it. And we ven- 
ture to say that Washburn will not dare to go 
up against us in a game two weeks hence. For 
the first time we are in a class with the best 
teams in the State, and we know where the 
credit should go. In the opinion of Washburn 
players, we have the strongest back field in the 
Slate and Washburn's coach was not sparing 
in his praise;. He says that we have the 
brightest prospects for football that have come 
to his notice this season. We are proud of 
our hoys for th" way they played. When 
fouled and battered by the fists of their oppon- 
ents, when ''kneed" and "neck twisted" openly, 
they took the punishment, went into the game 
with renewed determination and hucked the 
line in a manner clean, open, and hard. We 
believe them gentlemen, every one, whose 
hands it is an honor and a pleasure to shake. 
We are proud of them. For our new men we 
have only words of praise and we marvel that 
they could stand so well before men experienced 
in several seasons of play. We have a foot- 
ball team that will bring honor to its trainer 
and its College by victories that are yet to 

come. . 

Exchanges 

If you have a klnrt word say it ; 
If you owe ■ kindness pay it : 
Can vou do a kind deed - do it; 
If you mean to help another — 
Do it now . - Selected. 

The law school of K. U. occupies its new 
building this year. 

The Kansas University faculty now numbers 
188, an increase of US in ten years. 

Of the twenty -five universities of the entire 
world which enroll 5000 or more students, nine 
are found in this country. 

Harvard University will offer a $500 prize 
each year to her graduates or nnder-graduates 
for the best thesis on any economic subject. 

Don't go out to teach at forty dollars a 
month and then find it necessary to decline 
sixty and go to school to equip yourself for 

work.— ifo- 

Haskell has a good football schedule for this 
season. Besides points close at home they 
will play in Texas, Colo., Iowa, Okla., Ar- 
izona and California. 

At the University of California, the athletes 
are to he given a separate class in gymnasium 
work, and will receive credit towards gradua- 
tion for their work on the gridiron, diamond 
and track.- -Ex. 



92 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Mary Copley is on the sick list. 

Go to Bard well's for your hats. 

For style and prices go to Bardwell's. 

Perry Cooley -is Hekai„d janitor pro tern. 

John Calvin has joined the Rooters' Club. 

Half a dozen new class-room desks were re- 
ceived last week. 

Luther Holt was out of College last week on 
account of sickness. 

Coach Ahearn gave the foothall hoys a well- 
earned rest Monday. 

Winifred Dal ton went home Sunday morning, 
returning Monday afternoon. 

Hoy K. Finley, freshman, has dropped out of 
College on account of sickness. 

Two of the ''vet," hoys took a night off last 
week and buried a "loco horse." 

H. Tracy and T. F. White are grafting 
again for the view manufacturers. 

L. J. M unger, '05, says that the notice of 
"cook wanted" will bring results. 

Charles .Tucld, freshman last year, spent a few 
days around the College lust week. 

Miss MattiePittman missed several days of 
College last week, owing to sickness. 

Prof. E. B. McCormick's brother was visit- 
ing relatives and the College last week. 

Mr. Lund was called upon last Sunday to 
help repair a break in the city water system. 

Prof. R. R. Price has purchased the Bixby 
property, on Houston street, where he is now 
living. 

Miss Edith Ingham, of Washburn College, 
was the guest of Nell Hughes last Saturdav and 
Sunday. 

Misses Stella and Grace Hawkins enjoyed a 
visit from their aunt, Mrs. Garver, of Frank- 
fort, Kan. 

Representative Calderhead, of the fifth con- 
gressional district, gave a short talk in chapel 
Saturday morning. 

Miss Florence Sweet went to Blue Rapids 
last week to sing at the Ep worth League con- 
vention held at that place. 

Miss Caroline Morton entertained a few 
friends Saturday evening, in honor of some of 
the Washburn foothall players. 

Assistant Wheeler returned from the Kansas 
City Stock Show, Sunday, with the College 
stock. Pat Ireland was assisting. 



A visitor, seeing a pile of botany department 
boxes marked "Hot. Dept." inquired, "Where 
is the bottling department located?" 

Professor Brink is scheduled to give an ad- 
dress on - 'Education" at the Baptist State Con- 
vention, to he held this month at Parsons. 

Bun Thurston wants to have his name in the 
paper this week, hut refused to give reasons. 
He promised to order a number of extra copies. 

The Fifth District Convention of The 
Woman's Relief Corps was held in this city last 
week. A number of the delegates visited chapel 
Saturday morning. 

Professor Willard delivered a lecture at the 
farmers' institute in Waverly, last week, and at- 
tended the stock show in Kansus City on his 
return to Manhattan. 

Miss Hallie Smith went to Blue Rapids last 
week, as a delegate from the Kn worth League 
of the Methodist Church. The Kpworth League 
convention was held at that place. 

Some students find fault with the local editor 
for printing "joshs" or "roasts," but if thev 
do not fit your case, don't put them on, because 
they are meant for some one else whom thev 
will fit. 

A number of the fraternity boys, ably as- 
sisted by their girl friends* entertained the 
Washburn boys with dancing at Commercial 
Club Hall last Saturday evening from nine to 
eleven. 

The first number of the C. D. B. lecture 

course, of the Congregational church, was given 
last Friday evening by the Kuphonium Glee 
Club. Each number of the evening washighlv 
entertaining. 

The boys in th? dormitory gave the Wash- 
burn boys the free use of the bath, and of their 
private rooms, in which to dress, last Satur- 
day. Our Y. M. C. A. boys deserve praise for 
their generosity. 

A phone was installed at Athletic Park for 
the benefit of the Washburn rooters. They 
were going to report every touch-down to their 
friends at Topeka. But only one message was 
sent. High-priced message,' wasn't it? 

The College band was out for the paratle 
and the game on last Saturdav. This is th" 
proper thing to do, and the spirit shown bv 
the leader and members of the band might well 
be imitated by a good many others. 

Rev. O. B. Thurston's talk last Sundav eve- 
ning on "The College Man and Football," was 
well received by the large audience. The ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of the game were 
shown in a clear and pleasing manner. 

Lost, a small boy, about the size of a man: 
barefooted, with his father's shoes on; had an 
empty bag on his hack, containing two railroad 
tunnels and a pack of physics problems. Hj 
wore a mutton-chop coat," with bean-soup lin- 
ing. He was born before his elder brother, his 
mother being present at the occasion. When 
last seen he was carrying two megaphones and 
an R. C. button, going towards Athletic Park to 
see K. S. A. C, play football. Finder please 
return to the Herald office and receive reward. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



93 






J 

5 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course Ssr&tS 



Ask "Al" Cassell about the cat. 
Don't forget the place, at BardwelPs, 
Karle Thurston lost his brother last week. 
Are you a Co-op. stockholder? It costs it. 
A class is being organized to study French. 

Again we say: "The Hrrald wants a 
calender." 

You can always tint! the. latest styles at 
I la rd well's. 

A large number of visitors weiv around 
College last week. 

Will Yerkes will run the greenhouse heat- 
ing plant this winter. 

Get a copy of the College? song at the Her- 
ald office for live re its. 

Alvin Munger and Harold Thackery dropped 
(Hit of College last week. 

Lyman Streeter and Boy Baird went home 
Sunday to see their mothers. 

The blackboards in several of the class 
rooms were repaired Monday. 

Ada DeSelm, a former student, is in Cali- 
fornia for the benefit of her health. 

A number of Commercial Club men and their 
ladies visited chapel last Saturday. 

The city hospital N knocking on the "freshie" 
yelling during the "wee sma' hours.' 

Don't fail to hear Mfss Paxon. Sunday af- 
ternoon, at the Congregational church. 

Mr. Harner has quit working at the dairy 
barn. Stan Held does all the work at present. 

W 3 Drown is recovering from his hog 
bites and will be back in College in a week or so. 

Val Jean Biddison was up from Topeka last 
Saturday and ran opposition to the Rooters 
Club. 

Quite a number of the boys who are taking 
dairy laboratory are sending home for samples 
of cream, milk, and skim-milk for testing 
purposes. 

Dunn Thurston and Billie Anderson were 
seen Monday with a jug of {?). We suppose 
they are priming up for their encounter with 
the* Herald staff. 



Professors Dickens and Kin/.er are putting off 
their chapel speeches by not appearing in 
chapel. 

A section of the dairy "lab" hoys was taken 
to the dairy barn and given a practical lesson 
in plumbing, 

Bunn Thurston, Billy Anderson, Miss Stella 
Campbell and Miss Neva Larson drove up the 
Blue Valley, Sunday. 

Coaches Ahearn and Melick wish to congrat- 
ulate the Hooters' Club on the hospitality they 
have shown to the visiting teams. 

The janitor hoys are kicking because they 
are required to do their daily work now in two 
hours without an increase in pay. 

We were requested by Perry Cooley and 
Prank Harris not to mention that they went to 
St. George Sunday after paw- paws. 

Ground was broken Tuesday for the new seed 
house. It will he a large stone building, located 
at the northeast corner of the drill ground and 
will cost about $4000, 

Professor Kanuneyer addressed the Franklin 
Literary Society Saturday for a few minutes. 
He gave some good suggestions, which all 
society members might take to heart. 

Did you know that one-half of all of the 
College students trade at the Co-op's? This is 
one reason whv a share in the Students' Co-op- 
erative Association is a good investment. 

Professor Eyer went to Kansas city. Kan., 
last Friday to' lecture before the Kansas Elec- 
tric Water, Light, and Gas Association. He 
spoke on the "Tantalum Lamp." He returned 
Sunday evening. 

The Kansas Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations hold their convention in Manhattan, 
October 1!> to 22. Among the speakers are Dr. 
S S Estey, of Topeka. Miss Lama Radford, 
of Calcutta, and Miss Ruth Paxson, from Chi- 
cago. The evening meetings will be held in 
the Congregational church. 

Last Saturday some of our Topeka lady stu- 
dents entertained their gentleman friends of 
the Washburn team, at a grand hall given in 
the room over Professor Valley's office. Had 
it not been for the courage of Miss Augspur- 
.rer, serious damage to tin structure of the 
north end of the Auditorium might have been 
done. 



94 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




ALUMNI 




H. A. Avery, '0:2, whs visiting f fiends on 
College Hill lust week. 

Ula Dow, "<*•">, semis her address as Normal 
Hull. Framintfliam, Mass. 

James Johnson, '06, who is with th? Santa 
Fe in eastern Kansas, spent Sunday in Man- 
hattan. 

ValJean Biddiaen, who is study in* law at 
Washburn this year, and J. J. Biddison. '©#, 
came up from Topeka for the frame Saturday. 

Fred Wilson, '05, will leave In about two 
weeks for Arizona, where he has a position in 
the animal husbandry department of the U. S. 
experiment station of that state. 

Leslie Fit/., '02, and wife stopped in Manhat- 
tan last week to visit Miss Anna Fits, of the 
freshman class. Mr. Fitz was on bit wav tt> 
Washington. J). ('.. from McPherson, where 
he has been doiny suae work on the l\ S. gr&tti 
experiment station which has heen established 
there. 

The "farmers'* arc busy husking corn these 
clays. 

Professor Shossmith is organizing a class in 
corn indffing. The team that will go to Chi- 
cago the first we-k in December will he clrisen 
from this class. 

The Farm Departnent has sold about four 
hundred bushels ot small grain for seeding 
purposes this full, and has about five hundred 
bushels of pure seed-corn for sale. 

A number of Alpha Betas gathered at the Har- 
ris home on College Hill, Monday evening and 
enjoyed themselves with various amusements 
until light refreshments were served at an 
•'early" hour. 



PROFESSIONAL. 
1>K. G.'A. C1.1SK, DENTIST. 



M yuars of continuous practice should he convincini.' fur 
lushest skill and per feet ion. 



l>r. M. J. MeKEE, DKNTIST. 



Work ^mranteeo. ONee in Huntress Building. 327Povntx 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Onlce W; Res. m." 



DR. J. E. TAYLOIf, DENTIST. 

Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Buildinsr Fine 
tf old work u specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt MS Res . Ph one. Cave HO 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office In Union Natl. 
Bank Bids,'., Downstairs. 



Kings 



: Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Home-made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned arid Repaired 

AT ENGEL BROTHERS 
Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

^== MANUFACTURERS OF _ f — . 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns! 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves Sash 
Weitrhts. Chimney Caps. Structural Iron' Work 
Stove Repairs, etc Flume «. 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

■ FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 p hon e 55 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan, 

Over Union National Bank. 



OCtlUo GROW 

Elevator on C R. I, & P. Ry, 

Geo. T. Fielding & Sons. 

Office 113-15 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 

SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD' „ c , „ OPTICIAN 

nc - KAl - u - K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Offloe Phone 867 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



95 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 



WILL BE CLOSED 

THIS WEEK WHILE WE 
ATTEND THE PHOTOG- 
RAPHERS STATE ASSOCI- 
ATION AT WICHITA 



We Make Photographs 

Come and See Opposite Carnegie Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



F, B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



21« Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine Unectgmrsmnd toilet article* 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pa,v us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
torn always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis.. Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop, 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERTS 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



ao to 

fl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer you only the best. X X 

W. M, STDMGLEY & CO 



"*"~p»^^ 



V 



96 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



M 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



.«*. 



w 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



Students' Co-op, Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

227 Poyntz Avenue 




Special Rates to Student*, 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE 8t BELL, Props. 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

4U Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 



i 

i 



SHOES 

Of Style 
& Service 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 



Roberts & Ottowa amium 



* 

i 






150,000 Dairy Farmers are Going to be Added to the Big Army of More 

Than Six -hundred Thousand Users of 

Hp I oyol Cream Separators 



During the Year 1905 



The all-important profit-earning, time-saving need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval is the original, and has for twenty-five years 
led in centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- 
ize the construction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modern improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars are to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval Separator Company 



Randolph end Canal St*., Chicago 



New York 



^^■" -v » ■ v tv 




"the STAR GROCERY CO. 



= JOHN PURCELL 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 

327 POYNTZ AVE. We Deliver Goods Promptly 

Telephone No. 34. . to Any Part of the City 




College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Ma a l« and Lunches. Short Orders 
^Oysters. Sodas, and Confections... 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 

mum h mi moooooooooooffl 



looooooooooooc oonooo* 



HdidiiiisjAi 



I» *JU' I )^ I .1 1 Hi | "|nm ii nil. | | n F i > i . . . . t . y. ,». x~„ 







t***... 



aan n«iaiBBBBB MBnBBnBndBBB 



ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



1 
I 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 

Our Urge experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



Wmmmmmmmmmmm mm immmmmm 



mm mmmmKmmm mmmmmmmmmam 



Mote-Books 

Tablets, Stationery, Pencils, Pens, Ink, Memorandum Books, 
Composition Books, Library Paste, Dry Plates and Photo 
oupplies always fresh, 

Telescopes 

Handkerchiefs, Hosiery, Neckware, Ribbons, Underwear, 
Umbrellas, Jewelry, Silverware, Pocket-knives, Scissors, 

House Furnishings 

Fancy China, Souvenir Goods, Novelties, Sensitized Post- 
Cards, Souvenir Photos, Pillow Covers, K. S. A. C. Pillow 
Covers, Souvenir China. 

The BIG RACKET 

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmai 



[ ■ 







1 

We Extend to 

Every Student 

I 1 II MM j 

A cordial Invitation to visit our store. 
We have the largest, newest, up-to- 
date stock of JEWELKY in Man- 
hattan. 

OUR WATCH AND JEWELRY 

Repairing Department is one of the 

best equipped shops In Kansas. 

THE OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Is managed by an expert optician, 
who makes a specialty of oaring 
Headaches, Nervousness, Dizziness, 
Pains in Eyeballs caused from defec- 
tive eyesight. 

IF YOU ARE TROUBLED 

With any of these defects, we guar- 
antee to cure or it costs you nothing. 


Bilger's Hack 

AND 

Baggage Line 

Cab meets all trains day 
andmght Wlcallany 
place m town for pasten- 

ten. a: a: 

Fare, 25 cents 

Large* wagonette b the 
c*y. Statable for da* 

moderate. X 

Phone - 226 


ASKREN 

....The Jeweler and Optician.... 1 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



97 



r- 



)■ ■! 



»«i Ml 



I 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



M 



I 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



We make all our own 



Candi 



les 

Best Chocolates, :: 
Best Pan Candies, 
and Best Cream 
Candies. :: :: 




All kinds of 



Ice C 



ce ^ream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made 
to Order. Prices 



I 



Oysters. Ri 8 Kt 



FAitwitttn* Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUniain. ICE CREAM SODAS. 



L 



i 



I 

J 



r 



Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in and see our eighl-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains. Prices, $1 .00 and upward. 



"* 



Co-operative 



^, 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention 

Chas. S. Jones, 



Manager 



Bookstore 




1 

+ 

i 

1 



The College Grocery _andJ^ 

Dealer in 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



1116 MoroSt. 
Phone 227 



JOHN F. HARRISON —ESS 



i 

Weddive: ft 



98 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




DryGoods Room. 

How much our comfort 
depends on tfood, well- 
fitting 1 , warm 

Underwear 

these chilly mornings. 
You can get a medium- 
weight garment for 25 
cents, with a gradual 
rise in price up to $1 for 
the heavier ones. Our 
specialty in Dress-goods, 



Mohairs, Suitings, etc. 
is 50 cents. Hosiery, 
Mittens, Gloves, Corsets 

Shoe Department. 

Visit our Shoe Depart- 
ment for Shoes that fit, 
keep their shape and 
wear well. 

Hardware Room* 

When in need of any- 
thing in Hardware, re- 



member our big stock 
and low prices — let us 
supply you. 

Readyto^wear, 

We are now showing 
very good garments in 
Tailor-made Suits, 
Skirts, etc. 

Groceries, 

Pure Groceries, Queens- 
ware, Fuel, etc. 



We deliver *oods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms upstairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Heady- to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO! 

11 Courtney's Full-Vump Shoes are Good 
Enough for Mfc." 



SOLD ONLY BY- 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 




You can 

get everything in 

Clothing 



at 



COPYMOfT 1905 IT 
WE HOUSE OF KUPPENMBTB 



KNOSTMAN'S 

Underwear, 

Shoes, 

Hats 

and 

the greatest 

Suits & Overcoats 

ever 

seen in 

Manhattan 



3 rooms and 3 tailors at 
your service 



ALSO A SHOEMAKER 




PUBHSMEO 

Each Thursday By 
<c Stuocnts Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorlietEveiyOneGultivateHia Oiun Genias. 



VOLUME XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., October 26, 1905. 



Number 7 



K. S. A. C. 24-K. W. U. 0, 

In the football frame at Salina last Saturday, 
Kansas Weslyan University was defeated by 
the College by a score of 24 to 0. The victory 
can hardly be said to have been an easy one 
for the Salina boys played good, hard ball all 
the time. The teams were about evenly matched 
as to weight, but our fellows were in better con- 
dition. The first half was marked by poor 
playing, especially fumbling on the part of our 
boys. The backs had little trouble to make 
gains, but they couldn't make good connections 
with the ball. Both teams were weak on de- 
fense in this half. Our boys seemed to be af- 
fected with a case of over-confidence, and it 
took some time for that to wear off. 

For the Weslyans, Captain Morris was per- 
haps the best player, although Harvey, the 
little quarter, played a good game. Nash, the 
right half, also put up a good game. 

For the College, Nystrom and Scholz seemed 
to play the steadiest game, although Kirk did 
fine work after he went in at quarter. Mallon, 
R. Cave and Walker all made good gains. 
Ostlund, Haggman and Whipple got into the 
game- in good shape, especially in the second 
half. Montgomery tore holes in the line in the 
same way that he did with Washburn, but 
Cooley and Blake didn't get together on the 
other end as they should. 

FIRST HALF 

West van kicked off thirty-five yards to Mal- 
lon, who returned eighteen. On the first play 
our boys fumbled and a Salina man fell on 
tho ball. They started to work, and before 
they could be stopped the ball was twenty-five 
yards nearer our goal line. Most of their 
gains were made on tackle-back bucks off end, 
with Nash and Morris carrying the ball. The 
ball changed hands several times, each side 
making good gains. Our boys lost the ball by 



fumbles more than any other way. Finally, 
after fifteen minutes of play, our defense 
strengthened and our backs gained at will. 
Walker, Nystrom, Scholz and Cave made 
gains of from three to fifteen yards each, and 
Nystrom was sent over the line for the first 
touch-down, after eighteen minutes of play. 
Scholz kicked goal and the score was 6 to 0. 
Only two minutes were left to play and during 
this time the ball remained in Salina's posses- 
sion in their own part of the field. 

SECOND HALF 

At the beginning of the second half, Scholz 
went to right end, Mallon to left half, Russel 
Cave to full, and Kirk went in at quarter. 
These changes seemed to strengthen the team 
and they played better ball. The first touch- 
down was made in less than three minutes. 
Salina had failed to advance the ball, so 
they punted and Mallon returned fifteeu yards, 
and then made five yards more through the 
line. Nystrom was then called on and he made 
ten yards around the end for the second touch- 
down. Scholz kicked goal, making the score 

12 to 0. 

The third touch-down was made almost as 
easily. Haggman, Mallon, Scholz and Cave 
carried the ball back up the fieia from the 
kick-off and in seven minutes Nystrom had 
made the third touch-down. Scholz again 
kicked goal and the score was 18 to 0. 

After this, the game was a little slower. Sa- 
lina received the kick-off and by good playing 
returned the ball fifteen yards. Then they were 
held twice without gains and they prepared to 
punt. Their full-back signalled for the ball , re- 
ceived it, and just as he was about to be tack- 
led passed it back to Harvey, who circled the 
end for thirty yards while our boys were look- 
ing for the ball. Weslyan was then held twice 
in succession, so they were forced to punt, and 



100 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



in a few minutes Nystrom had bucked his way 
through for the fourth touch-down. Seholz 
kicked this goal, making the score 24 to 0. 

No more scoring was done and the game 
ended with the hall in possession of the College. 

The line-up Was; 

K. W. U. K. S. A. C. 

Flowers C Whipple 

Ktmr R. a...... Ostium! 

Hoffman E,. G Hawrman 

Hristow R. T Coolev 

Johnson L. T Montgomery 

Miller R, E Blake. Scholz 

Uutellns L. B Walker. B. Cave 

Harvey , Q \ Mallon. Kirk 

Nash R. H Nvstrom 

Morris U H R. Cave. Mallon 

MeNautfht..., F.... Scholz (Capl.). R, Cave 

Alpha Betas Entertain 

About eight o'clock Monday evening, October 
lfi, a jolly party of forty gathered at the home 
of Miss Josie Walter, at loin Humboldt street. 
The entertainers were Alpha Betas and the 
rooms were tastefully decorated in Alpha Beta 
colors, blue and gold. Acquaintance was 
quickly and easily made with the new students, 
and soon all were participating in the various 
good, old-standby games. Light refreshments 
were served at the proper hour. Frank Harris 
then gave a talk concerning the Alpha Beta 
society. Time passed quickly, and by eleven- 
thirty the last good-byes and sincere expres- 
sions of enjoyment had been said. J. A. 

Eurodelphian Society 
Society was called to order by President 
Dalton. Under the head of initiation of new 
members, the following persons were initiated: 
Ellen Berkey, Zola Walton, Ruth Eliot, Fanny 
Johnson, and Rev a Cree. We then turned to 
the head of program. The two piano solos 
rendered by Miss Nicholet were certainly en- 
joyed by the society. Miss Moore's select 
reading proved to come up to the standard 
Euro' paper. The debate, the speakers being, 
affirmative, Ella Myer, Marie Coons; negative, 
Jessie Marty, Helen Huse, was decided in favor 
of the negative. Miss Cooper then favored us 
with a vocal solo, accompanied by Miss. Lill. 
Katharine Cooper did her duty by presiding 
over the question box, after which Miss Stump 
gave us a piano solo. t. h. 

Agriculture Association 

The association was called to order by E. E. 
Green ough. The vice-president being absent, 
Mr. Greenough was elected temporary chair- 
man. After being led in devotion by Mr. 
Hull, we proceeded to elect new members. The 
names of Messrs. Garver, Bealey, Gernert and 
Purdy were voted on for election. Messrs. 
Gernert and Purdy, being present, were also 
initiated. 



Under the next head, which was the election 
of officers, the association decided to have 
E. E, Greenou-jrh call to order our future 
meetings. In case of his absence, Mr. Cald- 
well will occupy the chair. Clarence Lambert 
will record the proceedings of our meetings 
this term, and W. E. Watkins will criticise 
them. Harry Oman will attend to the finan- 
cial affairs. Ralph Hull, who is an able re- 
porter, will let you know what we are doing. 
Guy Yerkes, D. M. Gernert and R. A. Cald- 
well will have upon their hands the making of 
the programs. Clias. A. Gilkison was elected 
marshal 1 and L. B. Streeter assistant mar- 
shall. B. C. Copeland and Asa Zimmerman 
were elected first and second members, respect- 
ively, of the board of directors. 

As no program had been prepared, we re- 
sorted to extemporaneous speaking. Mr. Yer- 
kes, following his line of work, told us of his 
experience in spraying fruit trees. J, B. Pet- 
erson brought to our minds what we, as an A«. 
Association, should do and can do in further- 
ing the interests of our paper, the Ayrfcultnml 
Heriew, among the students and especially 
among the farmers. After a few more short 
talks the association adjourned, to meeS again 
next Monday evening. 



Alpha Beta 

The A. B.'s met again in the old hall Satur- 
day afternoon, and after a song and devotion, 
V. H. Berkey was installed as marshal just in 
time to "administer the oath" to a couple of 
new Alpha Betas. 

The program of the day, with the exception 
of a vocal solo by Miss Alspaugh arid a duet 
by the Misses Harris, was all about the 
"popular pig-skin," and was well prepared 
and just as well rendered. 

The business session was lively, to say the 
least, and occupied the society so long that we 
had to leave the critic's report and the rest of 
the usual order of business till we meet again. 

- . i*. A. T. 

Websters 

President Kiene called the society to order at 
8:15 P. m. After roll-call Mr. George led the 
society in devotion. 

The opening number of the program was 
music, by J. A. Lupfer, furnished by Earl 
Evans accompanied by Miss Sweet. Mr. C. A. 
Gilkenson then gave us an excellent magazine 
review. Next, R. R. Paine introduced to the 
society Misses Harold and Brown, who fa- 
vored us with a piano duet. A. B. Cron read 
to us an essay on habit. .Mr, Sherman was in- 
troduced to the society by W. A. Conner and 
favored the society with a vocal solo. Smith 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



101 



Farris gave the Webster "Reporter," which 
was an up-to-date number. Sol. then criticised 
the society in a way which was both beneficial 
and instructive to all present. After a long- 
business session we adjourned to meet again 
October 28, in the old chapel, where we expect 
to render a program which will entertain every 
one present. O. T. G. 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 

A basket-ball game was a feature of Satur- 
day afternoon, played between the College 
girls' team and a pick-up team among 1 the dele- 
gates. 

According to official report, two hundred 
sixteen delegates attended the convention. The 
largest delegation came from McPherson, there 
being twenty of them. 

The convention is over, the delegates have all 
gone home, but the inspiration that came with 
it will be felt in our association throughout 
the year. It has been a time never to be for- 
gotten, and the memory of it will last until the 
time comes when K. S. A. C. may have the 
convention again. 



hamps 

In the absence of the president, C. I. Weaver 
presided. The program was opened by R. R. 
White's music box. "The Evolution of the 
Sky Splitter" was given by E. A. Cowles. 
"Recent Progress in the Science of Agrimony 
and Zootechney" was discussed by Shelley. 
"Remeniscences of my Experience in the Uni- 
versal Rebellion," by J. M. Ryan. H. C. Far- 
rar, accompanied by Miss Huntress, sang a 
solo and responded to an encore. Mr. C. S. 
Jones told us about the school that made Man- 
hattan famous. "The Mad Rush is no More," 
by G. A. Porter. He told us the advantages as 
well as the disadvantages of the new post-office 
system. A, R. Pincomb read a paper on the 
bashful boy, after which H. E. Cate discussed 
"The Table Etiquette of the Faculty." An ex- 
cellent "Recorder," by W. D. Gernet, ended a 
good program. 

Wheat and Corn Special Train 

The College and Experiment Station, begin- 
ning Monday, November 6, will run a special 
train over all the lines of the Rock Island sys- 
tem to bring prominently before the people of 
the State the work done in wheat and com im- 
provement at the College by the Experiment 
Station. The train stops at all stations for :W- 
minute lectures and demonstrations. One of the 
coaches will be devoted to corn and the other 
to wheat. Farmers should be on hand promptly 
at the appointed time, for the trains will run 



regardless of weather and exactly on time. 
The complete schedule is published in number 
five of the IndustrialiM, and may be had from 
the College. It wHl also he printed in all the 
leading papers. 

Our Weekly Joshes 

Look on Bobby's coat for red hair. 

Al.Cassell is still explaining about "the cat." 

Topping was after an Indian delegate last 
week. 

Have Rose tell you that one about A. C. 
Farris. 

Professor Walters says that whistling is an 
out- do or sport. 

Wren Thurston will attend Clay Center high 
school after the holidays. 

According to latest accounts, Mr. Dickens, 
Jr., is sawing wood and saying nothing. 

C. E. Whipple returned from Salina singing: 

"Last niifhl all was mirth and laughter. 
But Oh: dear me, the irtornintr after.' 1 

Bunn Thurston helped to entertain a good 
many of the Y. W. C. A. girls last week. Earl 
helped Bunn. 

Coach Ahearn was out riding last Sunday 
afternoon. It required four chaperons to keep 
him straight. The residents of Blue Valley 
are wearing glasses and fixing their fences this 
week. 

Only two of the boys who went to Salina Sat- 
urday were seriously hurt. They were badly 
mashed in the region of the heart, but the doe- 
tor thinks that if they will try the climate of 
Salina they may soon recover. Too bad, 

Puzzle," but it can't be helped. 



Ml 



Both of the Same Kind 

A lady stepped from the limited express at a 
side station, on a special stop order. To the 
only man in sight she asked: 

"When is the train for Madison due here, 

please'/" 

"The train went an hour ago, ma'am: the 
next one is to-morrow at eight o'clock. 

The lady in perplexity then asked: 

"Where is the nearest hotel?" 

"There is no hotel here at all," replied the 

man, 

"But what shall I do?" asked the lady. 

"Where shall I spend the night?" 

"I guess you'll have to stay all night with 
the station agent," was the reply. 

"Sir!" Hashed up the lady, "I'd have you 

know I'm a lady." 

"Well." said the man as he strode off, so 
is the station agent." 



102 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




m»tu: LrrCenv 
OMCwLTfwfrtMw 

Own SCNMk "♦-* 

'Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year. In advance. 
Single copies, fiv e cents. 

F. A. Kienb. Je..'06 Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hkim. '08 Business Manager 

E. C. Farkab, '07 Literary Editor 

G. C. Kahl. '07 Local Editor 

Mattib Pittman. '06 Exchange Editor 

Carrol Wai.kkh. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomkh Y. 07 Subscription Manager 

L. E.GAHTON.'OS i ._ T ._.., __ 

Minnie hi. '07 f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Swbbt. *04 Alumni Editor 

J. B. Cgxen. '08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not lute J 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any Information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Oct. 26, 1905. 




We dislike to descend to the level of mud 
throwing', but we will feel somewhat relieved 
after announcing to the Watthburn Review that 
its version of the Washbum-K. S. A. C. foot- 
ball game is a lie, magnified about fifteen 
diameters. We would think that a spirit of 
fairness should be the first quality of a repre- 
sentative Christian college paper, but of course 
it is the privilege of the six hundred students 
of the Washburn University to snub and look 
down upon the small bunch of fifteen hundred 
students who congregate at the insignificant 
Kansas State Agricultural College with the 
same aims and purposes in their minds and 
hearts. 

Our second-team men deserve a great deal of 
credit for the work they are doing upon the 
practice field, and when they finally go before 
the public to show what they can do they 
should have the sympathy of all. Their first 
game will be with Chapman high school, on 
the home grounds, November It. They are 
working hard at present in practice and re- 



ceive a great deal of punishment for the inter- 
est they take. They are spirited men and are 
doing more for the success of the first team 
than they will ever he credited fordoing. Their 
work will also extend over into next year, for 
the men who work hard this year will be 
chosen for first places in the coming season. 



The Herald subscription list shows seventy- 
eight stockholders, one hundred twenty -two 
paid-up College subscribers and eighty-one 
who have not paid up. This total of two hun- 
dred eighty -one College subscribers is about 
half as large as it should be; not that the Her- 
ald is so valuable and excellent that you can- 
not afford to miss it, but that it and everything 
in which it is interested will be the better for 
your intelligent interest and sympathy. Sub- 
scribe, then work for the Herald. 



The second number on the lecture course is 
to be given next Thursday evening by the 
Jackson-Saramis Concert Company. This is a 
strong musical numtier and should be given be- 
fore a full house. We have learned that there 
are barely enough seats sold to cover the ex- 
pense for talent alone, and this means that the 
committee will report to the societies a large 
shortage at the close of the season. This should 
not be the case, for it will mean that, in spite 
of our first-class accommodations, the societies 
will never put on such a course again. The so- 
ciety members have worked hard and incess- 
antly to make this course perfect in every de- 
tail, and it is discouraging to think that this 
year, which should have been a banner year, 
must be the beginning of a slump that will be 
felt in succeeding courses for years to come. 
It is up to the students who are interested to 
get out and do a little hustling for the course, 
and it is up to the students who have not taken 
tickets to take them now. Committees have 
been appointed to work among the students 
this week and it is hoped that at least two hun- 
dred tickets will go. There is not an old stu- 
dent but will say that the course is worth twice 
the amount charged for the ticket, and that if 
the benefit that is derived from it could be 
measured in dollars the sum would mount up 
into the hundreds. We will be surety that if 
you patronize this course you will patronize 
all that follow while you are here. 



Our minds are turning slowly toward the 
event which should be the most prominent one 
of the year, and there are several phases per- 
taining to it which occur to the editor as wor- 
thy of treatment. The man who works all 
through the fall term, perhaps after more or 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



103 



less study, and thought during vacation, to 
prepare an oration superior to those prepared 
by his opponents and given the preliminary 
contests, and then follows this up with further 
study and practice until the date of presenta- 
tion, deserves moro from the Oratorical Board 
than a paltry twenty-dollar prize. It practi- 
cally means nothing to the individual society 
member to double or treble this amount. 
The fund might further be swelled by individ- 
ual contributions from those who feel that the 
contest is an important movement in the school 
and a benefit to the College. Tt is farther cer- 
tain that few will take part in the contest and 
do the necessary work on ambition alone and 
by heavy plodding. It is a requirement of 
success that each have College and society 
spirit and that all are borne up and carried 
along by enthusiasm engendered by this spirit. 
When we stand at a distance and look upon 
the oratorical contest with nothing but philo- 
sophical thought and disinterestedness, the at- 
tendant yells and demonstrations may seem to 
be child's play, but when we turn to think 
what College privileges mean to the young 
American, what all the attendant privileges 
mean that go with College education, we call 
that student unreasonable and selfishly un- 
grateful who does not, by enthusiastic demon- 
strations of some kind, voice the gratitude he 
should feel. And so we believe in yelling at 
the oratorical contest, that we should make it 
the zenith of our society enthusiasm and so 
high and wide that its effects will linger with 
us and thrill us when we answer to roll-call 
for the last time in the College year. 

There are meters of measure 

And meters of tone, 
But the best way to meter 

Is to meter alone.— Ex. 



Advice to Freshmen 

Don't fear the sophomores: they were fresh- 
men last year. 

Don't cut classes; that is a special privilege 
of the seniors. 

Don't cut chapel; that is a special privilege 
of the faculty. ---Bo;. 



"Honor and shame from no condition rise; 
Act well your part, there all the honor lies. 

These lines are made the basis of an editor- 
ial in one of our exchanges. Among other 
good things the writer says: "The small inci- 
dents we meet here in school from day to day 
may seem common to us in the extreme, but by 
acting our part well we may build up the un- 
seen but everlasting foundation of a noble 
character. 'Show yourself a man,' do not im- 
itate the conduct or habits of others." 




K _ 




A $40,000 civil engineering building looms up 
in the distance for Purdue. 

Carlisle expects to have one of the best foot- 
ball teams it has ever known this year. 

President Angel I, of Michigan, has begun 
his thirty- fifth year as president of that univer- 
sity . 

The head of the Michigan Engineering Col- 
lege is said to favor a six-year course for en- 
gineers. 

"The important thing in life is to have a 
great aim and perseverance to attain it. Don't 
be satisfied to 'keep going.' Be sure you are 
going somewhere." — Ex. 

In the case of Miss Caroline Hazard, for five 
years president of Wellesley College, we have 
a college president not a college graduate. 
This is rather an unusual occurrence. 

The football team of O. S. U. has unani- 
mously voted to organize itself into a Bible 
study class. They will deyote an hour each 
evening to the study and observe it as strictly 
as any training rule. 

A Missouri University man who has secured 
a Cecil Rhodes scholarship recently paid a 
visit to his alma mater before leaving for Eng- 
land. While there he was mistaken for a 
freshman by a sophomore band and hazed. 

College Life contains a short account of a let- 
ter written by a freshman to his mother. With 
more wisdom than his classmates are credited 
with having, he wrote home that his landlady 
had intended to kill the fatted calf for dinner 
the first day he arrived, but she made a mistake 
and killed its grandmother instead.— Ex. 

Here are some statistics which go to show 
how costly is ignorance. The value of a hoy's 
school days is found by substracting the earn- 
ings of a life of uneducated labor from the in- 
come of a man of education. If an uneducated 
man earns $1.50 a day for 300 days in every year 
for forty years he does well. That equals $1S,- 
000. A low estimate of the average earning 
power of college bred men is $1000 a year. That 
means $40,000 for forty years of such labor, or 
$22,000 advantage from the time spent in school 
This makes every school day worth $10, and 
the returns show well the posaibi lilies of this 
investment. 



104 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Go to Bardwell's for your hats. 

The Rooters' Club has new buttons. 

For style and prices go to Bardwell's. 

Better get busy; mid-term is not far off. 

Washburn 10, Ottawa 6; K. S. A. C. 29, 
Ottawa 0. 

Allen Philips spent Sunday with home folks 
in Topeka. 

You can always find the latest styles at 
Bardwell's. 

One share, $1; five share*, $5. What in? 
Co-ops., of course. 

C. A. Smith, sophomore last yea.r, was 
around College last week. 

We give ten per cent off on all trimmed hats 
for spot cash, at Mrs. Bardwell's. 

J. T. Maris, father-in-law of Orien Newlin, 
'07, was visiting the College last week. 

Miss Pax son, of Chicago, conducted chapel 
exercises last Friday morning. 

Frank Sorgatz, '07, has been called home on 
account of the illness of his brother. 

Frank Grabendyke assisted the Y. W. C. A. 
in entertaining the delegates last week. 

The freshman class chose their girl basket- 
ball players, at their last class meeting. 

Don't fail to see the "Web. special" in the 
old chapel October 28. Something doing. 

Oliver Hess, of Alma, Kan., a student in 
1903- '04, visited Miss Leo la Bixby last week. 

Miss Marcia Turner enjoyed a visit from her 
cousin, W. A. Bowen, of Honolulu, last week. 

The Chemistry Department recently received 
a shipment of supplies and some analytical 
balances. 

The Ionians met Saturday morning and 
adjourned so that the girls might attend the 
convention. 

The juniors are practicing football every af- 
ternoon, in preparation for the annual senior- 
junior game. 

Miss Ruth Neiman's brother, of Tacoma, 
Wash., visited her from Tuesday until Friday 
of last week. 

Miss Radford, of Calcutta, conducted ser- 
vices at the Congregational church last Sun- 
day morning. 

The third- and fourth-hour classes in mechan- 
ical drawing resemble classes in singing more 
than drawing. 



The ampelopis on the walls of our College 
buildings has changed from its glossy green 
to a beautiful bronze red. 

The Department of Architecture has ordered 
a new sciopticon lantern for illustrating Pro- 
fessor Walters' art lectures. 

Clifford Carr, freshman, accompanied the 
football team as far as Solomon. He drove to 
Salina Saturday and saw the game. 

Mr. Failyer, grandfather of Miss Lois Fail- 
yer, junior, died at the Failyer home on Mora 
street, Sunday morning, October 22. 

For an hour's recreation in the afternoon, 
happen in at the Auditorium and hear the 
band play one of Sousa's great pieces. 

Edward Young, of the Heat and Power De- 
partment, has accepted a position as plumber 
with Wm. Stingley & Co. of Manhattan. 

L. M. Graham, '06, had the misfortune of 
losing his bed the other night. The bed-cloth- 
ing caught fire from an electric light concealed 
in the bed. 

The Jayhawker has some new additions to 
their staff. M. I. Stauffer, '07, is subscription 
manager, and H. R. Hillman, '07, is assistant 
business manager. 

Following is the '06 engineers' yell: 

Hteh Potential, solenoid: 
Tantrent to a Helicoid; 
Juice conductors, biff spur gears; 
We're the '06 engineers. 

The Library has recently purchased a new 
set of Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, 
complete in five volumes. This index covers 
the period from 1802 to 1901. 

W. A. Turner, student in K. S. A. C. in 
1901-'02, now chief machinist on the tJ. S. ship 
Florida, visited his sister, Miss Marcia, and 
College friends Saturday. Mr, Turner was 
accompanied by his wife. 

Superintendent Rickman, of the Printing De- 
partment, ordered six hundred reams ( ft. car- 
load) of printing paper this week. The de- 
partment consumes from fifty to sixty reams of 
book paper per month the year round. The 
College print-shop is a very busy corner at 
present. Superintendent Rickman savs his 
force is putting in 24 hours a day, and' occa- 
sionally gets up an hour before day to get in 
over time. 

The College, with the co-operation of the 
Missouri Pacific railroad, started a two weeks' 
institute trip over the lines of that road, Octo- 
ber 25. The speakers from the College are 
Professors Dickens and Roberts. The" dates 
fixed are: Lindsborg, Octoter 25; Geneseo, 
October 20; Hoisington, October 27; McCracken, 
October 28; Scott City, October 30; Leoti, 
October 31 ; Tribune, November 1. On the re- 
turn trip the train will start east from Hutch- 
inson, November 8, making El Dorado, Novem- 
ber 9; Eureka, November 10; Yates Center, 
November 11; lola, November 13; and Moran, 
November 14. The subjects to be discussed 
will be orcharding and gardening, alfalfa, corn 
breeding, and seed adulteration. The College 
recently announced a similar trip over 'the 
Rock Island railroad, 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



105 



5 



5 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



Shoes repaired 
while you wait 



i 



i 




Why not be a Co-op? 

"Pat" Frown, '06, is on the sick list. 

The Library received a shipment of new 
books last week. 

The St. Mary's football team defeated the 
K. C. medics. 29 to 0. 

R. K. Stotts, of Garden City, spent Sunday 
with the Misses Lill and Marty. 

Dairy laboratory students are learning all 
about milk adulteration this week. 

Three classes in Mission study will be 
started by the Y. M C. A. this week. 

At the meeting of the Y. M. C. A. Sunday, 
$200 were subscribed for general expenses. 

Captain Shaffer and Miss Anna Hoch at- 
tended services at the Congregational church 
Sunday evening'. 

The Herald wishes to acknowled.?3 the ra- 
ceiptof two calendars, from "The Russel Co. 
Co-operative Association." 

Every inch of the dairy barn was scrubbed 
last Monday. The department will produce 
strictly sanitary milk hereafter. 

Doctor and Mrs. Barnes entertained Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Melick, Professor Ahearn and 
Miss Davis at supper Sunday evening. 

Reverend Thurston will speak next Sunday 
evening on, "Is Cash King? or Investments 
Paying the Best Dividends." All are welcome. 

' Anna and Raymond Harrison enjoyed a 
visit from their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gaston, of Jewell county, Sunday and Mon- 
day. 

Have you purchased a lecture-course tieket? 
The next numlwr will be given October 31, by 
the Jackson-Sammis Concert Co. No one 
should miss it. 

Don't fail to hear Leonora Jackson next Tues- 
day evening at the Auditorum. Those who 
heard Dorathy Hoyle last year will do well to 
prepare for an even greater musical feast tnis 
time. 

The Animal Husbandry Department has 
recently purchased a Shorthorn steer that 
promises to be something big when he grows 
older. He weighs 1400 pounds at present and 
is only two years old. 



Jessie Bnllou, '05. is teaching school near 
Delphos, Kan. 

Edith Goodwin, '03, visitedher brother at K. 
S. A. C. last weak. 

Rett a Womer. '04, came up from K. U. to at- 
tend the Y. W. C. A. convention last week. 

J. T. Skinner, '01, has just begun his work 
as superintendent of the electric light plant at 
Lawrence. 

Miss Birdie Secrest. '02, visited her sister, 
Miss Viola, and College friends last Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

Howard Rhodes, *0fi. ticket agent at the U. 
P. depot here, and Wilraa (Cross) Rhodes, '04, 
are the proud parents of a little girl. 

We hear that Mrs. Inez (Wheeler) Westgale. 
'05, is enjoying housekeeping in a front Hat of 
an apartment house in Washington, D. C. 

J. C. Cunningham, '05, and Russell Cunning- 
ham, a former student, have taken homesteads 
on the "Dewey ranch," in western Kansas. 

Miss Mamie Cunningham, '05, who has been 
teaching in the city schools of Fairview. Okla., 
is suffering from an attack of typhoid fever. 

C. P. Blachly, 'On, spent Sunday with rela- 
tives and friends at Manhattan. Chas. has 
the position of an electric inspector with the 
Santa Fe, with headquarters at Topeka. 

I A Correll, *03, sends his address as 34 
Dartmouth street, Boston. He is well pleased 
with his work at the Boston Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, but still wants to know "what's doing 
at K. S. A. C. 

L V. Sandford, '01, says to tell his College 
friends he is leading the life of a farmer near 
Oneida, Kan. He says, "I'm getting around 
three square meals a day, such as they do not 
get at their hash houses." 
* Josephine Edwards, Bertha Cowles, Helen 
Bottomly, and Lena Finley, all '05, assisted 
Mrs. Pfeutze, of the advisory board, in serving 
a luncheon to the members of the visiting Y. 
W C A. cabinets last Saturday afternoon. 



106 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Additional Locals 

The Y. W. C. A. convention held their meet- 
ing last Saturday afternoon in the Auditorium. 

Misses Anna and Jessie Fearmen enjoyed a 
visit from their mother and two brothers Sun- 
day. 

Miss Mattie Wallace, freshman '04, is work- 
ing for Superintendent Hickman, of the Print- 
ing Department. 

The Thursday evening praver meeting at the 
Y. M. C« A. parlors will be led by D. H. Grip- 
ton. His subject is, "The Value of God's 
Word in Our Lives." 

The, sad news was received Monday evening 
that Mrs. Earl £ utter field had died Very sud- 
denly, at her home in Washington D. C Mr. 
Butterlield, who - was graduated here in '08, 
has. a Government position in the Horticul- 
tural Department and took his wife there as a 
bride less than a year ago. Mrs, Butterfield 
was formerly Miss McKee, a sister of Roland 
'McKee, 'oo. 

The engineers held their first weekly meeting 
Monday evening. Professor Anderson and 
C. I. Weaver conducted the program, Mr. 
Anderson telling oi" his trip to Humpy and 
also some facts about the school of technology 
in Sweden, and Mr. Weaver of his experiences 
at the Armour Institute of technology, iu Chi- 
cago. 

The girls' basket-bal I team defeated a oicksd 
team from the Y. W. C. A. delegates last Sat- 
urday by the score of 18 to 2. Tne features of 
the game were the playing of Laura Lyman 
and the consistent team work of the College 
girls. Th3 line up: 

K - s - A . C. PrcKED Team, 
Lyman c Vehh 

„ , t Wilson 

DeArmoml I Forwards \ Kealear 

nmtbieok \ I Warten 

Hanson i „. . i tx nv 

Cunningham ( Guards i Roach 

Referee, Coach Melick; umpire, McLean. 



PROFESSIONAL, 
DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



M years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DENTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building. 327Povntz 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Office G6; Res. 63. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 In Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 1 40 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. Office Phone 307 



King's 

Fountain Drinks 
Ice-Cream 



Homemade 

Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stores 
Cleaned and Repaired 

M ENGEL BR OTHERS 
Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

-e== MANUFACTURERS OF ^— v 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns' 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves. Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone el 

Manhattan, Kan. 706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

dealIr in 
FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone ^5 Phone 55 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

^__^_^ Ovmr Union National Bank. 



ofcfcUb GROW 

Elevator on C R. I, & R Ry, 

Geo- T. Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113,15 N. Second St. 



Allingham & Beattie 



DEALERS IN 



FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



107 



Wolfs Cottage Studio 




Opposite Carnegie Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE - - 33 

F. B, ELLIOTT 



J. W. BELL 

Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. . . . 

Porcelain bath tubs, fine llneclgarsand toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1 .00 
302 Poyntz P, C HOSTRUP, Prop. 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS G0 to 

21 » Poyntz Ave., Manhattan, Kan. 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc, 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
• offer you only the best X, X, 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO, 



m'i. .. »*f IVm - i- ' ■""* ■ i 



108 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



M 




The Elk Barber Shop 

AND BATH ROOMS 



m 



SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
AND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 



Students' Co-op. B oarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, - - Steward. J 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo o ood 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

227 Poynii Avenue 




Special Rates to Students, 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE & BELL, Props. 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poynti Avenue. Phone 74 



SHOES 




Of Style 
& Service 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 



Roberts & Ottowa ciothiers 



I 

fou 4 



s 



150,000 Dairy Farmers are Going to be Added to the Big Army of More 

Than Six-hundred Thousand Users of 

Hp I £1 V3I Cream Separators 



During the Year 1905 



The all-important profit-earning, time-saving' need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator Is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval is the original, and has for twenty-five years 
led in centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- 
ize the construction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modern improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars are to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval Separator Company 



New York 



THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

JOHN PURCELLs = 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 



327 POYNTZ AVE. 
Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly 
to Any Part of the City . . . 



i 




College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunchas, Short Order* 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confection a... 



GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 



4 

ii 



' 



- i 






■ 






WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. 




ELLIOT 



WE ALWAYS HAVE a full aasortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. XXX X 

WE CARRY a complete fine of Fine 
Shoe*, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc X 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
yean enables us to meet dies waatt exactly. X X 

312 POYNTZ AVENUE, s MANHATTAN. KAN. 




ti 



tttCtAt L t C L 



\\ 



Note-Books 

Tablets, Stationery, Pencils, Pens, Ink, Memorandum Books, 
Composition Books, Library Paste, Dry Plates and Photo 
Supplies always fresh, 

Telescopes 

Handkerchiefs, Hosiery, Neckware, Ribbons, Underwear, 
Umbrellas, Jewelry, Silverware, Pocket-knives, Scissors, 

House Furnishings 

Fancy China, Souvenir Goods, Novelties, Sensitized Post- 
cards, Souvenir Photos, Pillow Covers, K. S. A. C. Pillow 
Covers, Souvenir China. 

The BIG RACKET 



\ 



\ 



TY^*^ 



I 



r 



*7^r/ 2_, /<?Q 



1 



Wxz Students' Herald 



i 



i 



Published by the Student* 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College 2*> X 








- i 



i 




' 



r 



Keuffel & Esser Co 

* OF= NEinZ YORK * 

813 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 



" Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraxon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS,. TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS U^). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



Askren's 

Money Jar 

The Jeweler fit Optician, Manhattan, Kan, 



We have placed 
in our window 
a far contain- 
ing a sum of 
money to be 
given away 

FREE 

Have you 
seen f 1 7 

<•) Q) (*) <*) 

fiat Pins, Stick 
se* the 



Pine, Solid-gold and 

Gold-filled Jewelry. 

Our store is filling up 

every week with new 

and sparkling Jewelry. 

Fine Silk Umbrellas for 

Ladies and Gentlemen. 

Solid-silver Souvenir 

Spoons, When you 

buy anything in this 

store you do not have 

to select from a lot of 

old shop-worn goods. 

This is the up-to-date 

Jewelry Store whe r e 

you find the new stock. 

Pins and Brooches. Call and 
m. They are Beautlea. 



ASKREN, 



The Jeweler 

and 

Optician 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets ail trains day 
and night Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate. X 



Phon 



226 






4 ■ 



V 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



109 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 




LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always In demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Opposite Carnegie Library 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



n mi M , . FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Schultz Bros. Meat Market. K 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 
MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 



Special Prices to Students Wait for 
33 the Wagons- - ■ Phone 157 



EB, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



21» Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan, 



BOYS! 

IKE HOLBERT'S 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



i- 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, mm line cigars and toilet articles 



ao to 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best* X> **- 

W. M. STDNGLEY & CO. 



110 



THE S'TUDENTS' HERALD. 



^_ 



THE 



E. B. Purcell Trading Co. 

5 Stores Under one Roof 



Dry-Goods, Shoes, 

Ready-to- Wear, Hardware, 

Groceries 



Telephone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready-to- Wear and Hardware 

Telephone 88 for Groceries, Queensware and Fuel X X X 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO! 

"Courtney's Full- Vamp Shoes are Good 
Enough for Me/' 



SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 



King's 

Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Home-made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

-<== MANUFACTURERS OF b 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators. 
Safety Corn Harvesters, Little Wonder Chums. 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weitfhts, Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone tt. 

Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
^ Cleaned and Repaired 

£E ENGEL BROTHERS 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students OrTiiE 
Agricultural College 

MottorLetBvejyOneCultivateHis Qiuv Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., November 2, 1905. 



Number h 



K.S.A. C. 10, St Mary's 5 

Last Monday, on an exceedingly muddy field, 
our football team walloped Coach Quigley's 
Irish by the above score. The game was ours 
from the start to the finish, although the visit- 
ors made the' first touch-down. This only 
made our boys fret into the same in better 
shape and with more ginger. There may have 
he vn a time when a team representing this Col- 
lege could be called "quitters," but the team 
' we have now can never be called that. The 
way they played after that touch-down was 
worth going miles to see. 

The teams were as evenly matched in weight 
as any two football teams could be, but in 
team-work and defense the visitors were out- 
classed. Had the game been on a dry field our 
boys would certainly have won by a much 
larger score. Both teams were in good condi- 
tion and no one can say that the game was not 
a fair test of their merits. The visitors were a 
<rood, elean-plaving bunch of athletes, who 
played hard as long as they could stand; but 
our bovs were too good for them. 

The ^arne was short, and all the scoring was 
done in the first half. The last half was cut to 
ten minutes in order that St. Mary's could get 
home by bed-time. 

For the Irish, King, the full-back, Murphy, 
the quarter, Captain Walsh, the left end. and 
Lnrkin. the right guard, played the best game. 
Ashe, who replaced Sennoughty at tackle in 
the second half, was a good man. but he 
couldn't stop "Cap." and "Joe." 
'Nystrom was the greatest ground- gainer for 
the College and he made both of our tonch- 
downs." Mallon" didn't make so many gams, 
but his interference was fine. Captain Schol/. 
played the same kind of ball he always plays 
and the Irish could hardly stop him. Ostlund 
and Wilber played the guards and did well. 



Wilber was playing his first game for the Col- 
lege, and he made good. Cooley and Mont- 
gomery were doing business at the same old 
place^that is. when they were not sitting on 
their opponents. Walker at left end broke his 
interference every time and if the tackle ever 
got past him we failed to see it. Blake played 
the first half at right end and played a better 
came than ever before. Russell Cave went in 
at full in the last half and did his share of the 
ground gaining. There are two men whom we 
havn't mentioned yet. They are, "Papa 
Whipple and "Son" Kirk. These two make a 
pair that is hard to beat, for they handle the 
ball in the finest possible shape. 
FIRST HALF 
St Mary's won the toss and chose the west 
coal. Scholz kicked off for thirty-five yards 
and the ball was returned twelve. Three times 
the visitors made their distance and then they 
were forced to punt. Mallon caught the ball in 
the middle of the mud-hole and was downed at 
once Our boys carried the ball back twenty 
vards in four plays, but the mud and Irish to- 
gether was too much, so Kirk punted. Murphy 
secured the ball, dodged our tackier, and then 
while Kirk and Scholz were plowing through 
the mud he trotted down the grass on the north 
side of the field and placed the ball behind the 
goal. He failed to kick goal, so the score was 

' Our boys then took the west side of the field 
and received the kick-off. Wilber caught it 
and made a short return, and then our fellows 
trot down to work. Nystrom made twenty 
yards, and Scholz ten. Then Mallon made 
ten yards and Kirk made four. The line made 
holes and the backs went through, and after 
ten plays Nystrom was sent over for our ■first 
touch-down. The goal was missed, and the 
score was a tie. 



112 



THE STUDENTS' HEKALD. 



Scholz kicked off to St. Mary's for thirty 
yards and they returned live. Three times 
they tried to gain, hut each time Scholz trot 
the runner, so after the fourth down they 
punted. Then the parade again started, and 
Ny strom, Blake, Walker, Mai Ion and Scliolz 
made gains of fiom three to twenty yards 
each. By straight football our hoys gained 
yard after yard, and in four minutes Ny strom 
was sent over for the second tout'h-dnwn. The 
ball was too heavy, so the goal was missed. 
Score, 10 to 5. 

The only feature of the remainder of the half 
was a sensational return of four yards by 
"Papa" Whipple on the next kick-off. The 
half ended with the hall in possession of the 
College on the visitors thirty -yard line. 

SECOND HAL.F 

St. Mary's took a brace in the second half. 
The College received the kick-off, hut the visit- 
ors didn't even get to feel of the hall. They 
fought like demons and every foot of ground 
was contested, but our boys were steadily car- 
rying the ball down the Held. Russel ( "ave did 
good work both in running interference and in 
carrying the ball. All the backs made good 
gains. Nystrom, Cave and Mallon made from 
two to five yards each time, but they had to 
work hard. Scholz made an end run for thirty- 
flve yards, hut the umpire said that somebody— 
he didn't know who— had held so the ball was 
brought back. Time was called at the agreed 
moment and that and nothing else saved St. 
Mary's from a worse defeat, for Mallon had the 
ball and was still going when the whistle 
blowed. 

The line-up: 

St. Maby's. Position. K. S. A. C. 
Munroe C....... Whiuole 

Isenman L. G . . . . . Wilber 

Sennou* hty. A she R.T Cool e v 

g**££? h £ Montgomery 

Wwn-Vi ■ ?' E Blake, Scholz 

MUrpnj* ,..q : Ki k 

gWM - R H Nvitrom 

Moran L. H. Ma :Um 

Km * F..., . Scholz (Capt.). K. Cave 

Officials: Coleman, of K. U.; Hill, of Haskell. 



Alpha Betas 

President May Harris rapped for order at 
2:30 Saturday afternoon, and the society was 
opened by a piano solo by Miss Edna Jones 
and devotion by Miss Alspaugh. 

Miss Bratton and Messrs. Willard, Page, 
and Cormack showed that they know a good 
thing, by promising to support the constitution 
and by-laws of the society. The head of pro- 
gram was then announced. 

Harry Oman, Venus Kimble, and Lee Clarke 
presented the respective advantages of the Ac. 



D. S., and G. S. courses, and Miss Kohl ond 
"Shorty" S.trester proved by a, vot3 of two to 
one that we ought to have a fine art school in 
j K. S. A. C; Miss Needham and Mr. McKee 
vainly opposing the addition. of tha course. 
Miss Harold favored us with two pleasing 
piano solos, and after recess "Pat" Murphy 
played a guitar and mandolin trio, by proxy, 
Misses Kahl, We>t*at?, and Lane acting as 
substitutes. Then we "chewed the rag" for 
an hour or so and adjourned for supper. 

. P. A. T. 

Engineers 

The Engineers met Saturday night, in elec- 
tricity lecture room, and elected officers under 
the new constitution. All but one of the old 
officers were re-elected. No program had been 
prepared for this meeting, hut some interesting 
talks and some good suggestions for future 
programs were given. All junior and senior 
engineers should come out and he?p to make 
the programs a success. 



Eurodelphlan Society 
The Eurodelphian society was called to or- 
der by President Dalton. The first number on 
the program was music by Jessie Apitz, Who 
presented Miss Secrest. Following this, Pro- 
fessor Kammeyer gave an excellent talk on the 
"Duties of a Society member." EHen Hanson 
then introduced the Misses Lane, Kahl, and 
Westgate, who favored us with music. Miss 
Dalton gave a very interesting story on "How 
I Picked Blackberries." Miss Huse's paper 
on '"Current Events at C College," caused the so- 
ciety much amusement. We then adjourned 
for five minutes' recess, after which occurred 
an animated business session. k. o. 



lo, to, to, Ionian I 

Society was called to order by President 
Mattie Pittman and opened with singing and 
devotion. 

The close attention given to Miss Thompson's 
piano solo, which was the first nun.rer on the 
program, clearly showed the appreciation of 
the society. This might also be said of Miss 
Spohr's review of "The Prospector," which 
was very comprehensive, taking in the princi- 
pal events of the book in an interesting man- 
ner. The next numl)er was a voenl solo by 
Florence Sweet. Tennyson's well-ki.own poem, 
; The Bridge," was well rendered by Daisy 
Harner. Laura Lyman's question-box was in- 
structive as well as diverting. "What do you 
think of the action of the K. S. A. C. boy .< dur- 
ing the convention?" was one of th? questions 
and Miss Ise's answer, "That their d-votion 
to the delegates was more of an inducement to 



_ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



113 



the sentimental than to the spiritual, but was 
no morj than could be expected of a man," 
brought a round of applause. That some of 
the new members will prove valuable additions 
to the society was shown by Miss Church's 
answer to the question, "What were your rea- 
sons for jouiing the lonians?" Her answer 
was: "The reputation of the society, its good- 
looking members, and its inspiring yell." 
Miss Jones' piano solo was encored and she 
entertained us again. A good number of the 
"Oracle" was edited by Marie Bardshar. A 
vocal solo by May Umber ger followed this 
number, after which Kate Alexander read an 
original story giving the moon's vision of the 
seniors in their future homes. 
The business session was interesting. 



-Webs." 
One, two, three. Hie! "Did you help swell 
the crowd in the old chapel last Saturday 
night?" "1 certainly did." "Wasn't it a 
hummer?" "What" "The Web Special." 
The program was opened by music by Ross 
Sweet, furnished by Miss Blachly accom- 
panied by Mrs. Htttto, which was very good. 
This was followed by a play by F. W. Cald- 
well, which showed that Mr. Caldwell knows 
his business when it comes to performing lie- 
fore the foot-lights. .1. R. Coxen introduced 
Miss Lane who, accompanied by Mrs. Hutto, 
gave an excellent violin solo. Smith Fens' 
recitation was the next number. Fred Lindsey 
introduced Miss Dodge, who favored us with 
a reading that was certainly great. "^Legs" 
Thurston read an essay on "Athletics." This 
was followed by a good illustration by W. M. 
Putman, who, with a class of acrobats, gave a 
future view of the Y. M. C. A. "Gym." 

A. O. Nash's music, furnished by Maurice 
Oteyza accompanied by Miss Evans, was well 
received. The "Reporter," read by H. R. 
Hiem, was one the best of this terra. M. R. 
Schuler, assisted by a company of theater 
stars, gave the play "That Rascal Pat" in a 
way which showed that Websters make jfOOd 
actors as well as football players. After the 
critic's report we adjourned, every one agree- 
ing that the Websters do as advertised. 



j. J. w. 



His Need Worse than Hers 

We have been informed that one of our 
newly-married young ladies kneads bread with 
her gloves on, says the Cambridge, Ohio, Sun. 
The editor of this paper needs bread with his 
shoes on; he also needs it with his trousers on: 
and unless the delinquent readers of this old 
rag of freedom pay up soon, he will need bread 
without a darn thing on. 



At That Farmers' College 

( With apologies to the Denver Post.) 

Folks have had a lot to say 
About that Farmers' College, 
"Welt" it to them every day 
About their football, knowledge.* ■ 

Josh them to the very core, 
Say they send their seconds o'er, 
Even then they cannot score, 
At that Farmers' College. 

Now its students turn to laugh, 
Giving other schools the gaff, 
How the game is played each half, 
At that Farmers' ( 'ollege. 

Salina's, Ottawa's, defeat 
Washburn, too. with her conceit, 
Telling why she was not beat 
By those husky Farmers. 

Ought to see Coach Ahearn grin 
As the scores came rolling in, 
When from St. Mary's we did win, 
At that Farmers* College. 

Rooters' Club is feeling gay, 
Well filled up on dope each day. 
So the team they cheer each play 
At that Farmers' College. 

When the football season's done, 
At that Farmers' College, 
And the team their laurels won, 
At that good old College, 

Prexv, with his heart well stirred, 
Reads a chapter from the Word, 
Then looks up and thanks the Tx>rd 
That the season's ended. 

J. W. BLACHLY, 



The Millennium Had Come 

An English lord was traveling through this 
country with a small party of friends. At a 
farmhouse the owner invited the party in to 
supper. The good housewife, while preparing 
the table, discovering she was entertaining nobil- 
ity, was nearly overcome with surprise and 

elation. = 

All seated at the table, scarcely a moment * 
peace did she grant her distinguished guest in 
her endeavor to serve and please him. It was 
"My Lord, will you have some of this?" and 
"My Lord, do try that," "Take a piece of this, 
my Lord" until the meal was nearly finished. 
The little fuur-y ear-old son of the family, 
heretofore unnoticed, during a moment of su- 
preme quiet saw his lordship trying to reach 
the pickle-dish, which was just out of his 
reach, and turning to his mother said: 
"Say, Ma, God wants a pickle." 

"The state railroads of Belgium have insti- 
tuted a system of railroad hospitals. Each 
car in the- service contains eight movable 
couches, a dispensary and an operating room. 
The cars are being distributed at convenient 
points of the system." 



114 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Mat™ LetEvtWY 

ONtCtftrivwrcHi* 

OwnOckia • 

r Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlee at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
, class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies. Ave cents. 

F. A.KIENB.JK..06....... .....EditoiMn-cbief 

5*J?'tV K1M " 06 ' j u Business Manager 

E. C. Fakrab W Literary Editor 

«\™ KA « c ° 7 - — : lMca ' 1 tmtot 

Mattie Pitt* an. 1)6 Exchange Editor 

Cabhol Walker. W Assoc. Business Manager 

£". E. KoS? ¥ ' W " " Subscri " ti( > n Manager 

Minnie Ise. '07 f Assoc. Local Editors 

^''^^h Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

.7. R. Coxen. 08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

u To Jl sur !: lns e r ti°°- matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chiefs hook not late* 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that vour subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully renuested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be clad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Nov. 2, 1905. 




The Engineering Association is now organ- 
ized for weekly meetings on Saturday nights. 
We have only the best wishes for its prosperity 
but are displeased that it takes from the evening 
societies many of the senior and junior mem- 
bers at a time when membership is low and the 
new members are not well broken in. The as- 
sociation will need the interest and devotion of 
all its members to make it a success. Its great- 
est difficulty will be contention with the com- 
monplace, and the best method of fighting this 
is that of making the numbers in each program 
few and to concentrate upon each one the ener- 
gies of several members. 



Saturday is mid-term, and after custom will 
be a general examination day when a reckoning 
is taken of the work done during the past 
half-term. There will be failures and low 
grades we suppose -failures unavoidable and 
avoidable. To those in the first class we 
would say, don't worry about finals, but work 
hard; to those in the last, we can only give 



this comforting bit of assurance, "It's never to 
late to mend." We come here for 1 usiness, 
and pleasure should take the second pace, Of 
course we do not mean that one shot 'd carry 
this idea to the extreme, and exclude every- 
thing but books from the mind. Th re is a 
happy medium which is certain to leaw you at 
the end of your college career strong j.nd well 
trained, mentally, not narrow, and p assessed 
of a pleasing personality. 



Knock 

It seems to the knocker that a good whack 
at the conduct of some of the students dur- 
ing chapel exercises would not come amiss 
if the whack could only be made to land in the 
right place. There is a tendency among some 
of the students to regard chapel as an oppor- 
tunity -for making themselves ridiculous. 
Many people who would enjoy the morning ser- 
vice if it were not for the noise and disturbance 
made by these thoughtless rounders, refrain 
from coming. People whose minds are open 
to nothing but something light and foolish can 
never concentrate their thoughts on a deep 
subject for more than five minutes, as was 
plainly evident on several different occasions 
during the last two weeks. When the student 
body has an opportunity to hear an address 
by some prominent person, invariably some one 
is kept from hearing it all by the' incessant 
talking and laughing of some ill-bred fellows 
who haven't enough respect for themselves nor 
the speaker to remain quiet, to say nothing of 
the good they might obtain if they would open 
their minds to the thoughts being presented. 
Again, upon the rendering of a sacred solo or 
song the appreciation of the audience could be 
much better shown by respectful attention than 
by a loud applause. 



Put on Vour Thinker 

Two years' subscription to the Herald will 
be given to the author of the best Thanks- 
giving story placed in the hands of the editor 
on or before Tuesday, November 21. The 
story must be thoroughly original. This offer 
is made to students and alumni of the College 
only. 

We shall find that the love of nature, wher- 
ever it has existed, has been a faithful and sa- 
cred element of human feeling: that is to say, 
supposing all the circumstances otherwise the 
same with respect to two individuals, the one 
who loves nature most will be always found to 
have more capacity for faith in God than the 
other.— John Buskin. 



Fairmount nt. K. S. A. C. next Monday. 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



115 




"Rock a bye senior, on the tree top, 
As long as vou study the cradle will rock: 
Ret if vou stop digtrrn* the cradle will fall, 
• -And down will come senior, diploma and all. -JRK. 

Yale has a total attendance of 3300 this year. 

—Ex.: " ' 

The best prophet of the Future is the Past. 

— Byron. 

AV Idaho. University fall training is being 
given to the men for track work. 

The under graduates of Cornell are publish- 
ing a daily paper of eight pages. It is called 
the Cornell Sun.— Ex. 

"The spoke in the wheel that creaketh most 
doth not bear the greatest burden in the 
cart. *— Thm. Fuller. 

Th3 prasidenfc of tha University of Washing- 
ton recently publicly commended ths annual 
class scraps in an address. 

Yale freshmen are forbidden to engage in 
any athletic contests because of participation 
in a reeent riot. A number will be suspended. 

Four hundred sixty students are enrolled in 
the German Department of K. U. this year. 
This is a decided increase over any previous 

time. 

Chicago University will be divided up into 
" a number of small colleges this year, all to be 
operated under the one head and plan of direc- 
tion. 

At the Massachusetts Agricultural College of 
Amherst, an annual rope-pull contest takes 
place between the freshman and sophomore 
classes. 

One university which has just completed a 
new fire house will man it with a corps of stu- 
dents, thus giving them practical training in 
fire-fighting, , 

The Department of Vocal Music is beginning 
work for the big Music, festival, to be given in 
March. Professor Valley reports some fine 
new material. . . 

The champion shot- putter of the world, Coe, 
is a Michigan student this year and will par- 
ticipate in track athletics next spring. He for- 
merly attended Oxford. 

Since last year it has become a custom at 
Minnesota to sing the college song every Fri- 
day morning in chapel. In this way it becomes 
familiar to every student. i . -.■ 



It is said that American college men oxcvl 
the Englishmen in most athletic sports. This; 
superiority is not natural, but acquired, daeJSo 
more thorough instruction. 

Pennsylvania State College has a 'new <k ;'- 
mitory that will shelter one hundred fifty tneii. 
It has also made provisions to feed eight hxitf- 
dred fifty students at one time. • ■ 

Illinois has established a series of eve"i:ig 
meetings, which are to he given over tasin^in^. 
The object of this is to make all the students 
more familiar with the college s*o*igs. " 

Chicago now has a college of religious and 
social science. The object of this is to train 
Y. M. C. A. secretaries, medical missionaries, 
and all others who are anticipating taking up 
this kind of work. 

Chicago University has called for drawings of 
seals from which to select one. A large uum- . 
ber of designs were presented, but all bearing 
the student lamp were rejected, as it was 
thought that it would suggest Standard oil. - 
Ex.'' 

The Washburn Board of. Athletics will issue 
free tickets to all faculty members and students 
of that institution. The.se tickets have to be prop- 
erly signed by the bearer and are non-transfer- 
able. ^They are to be good for all the games ex- 
cept with K. U. The athletic managers have 
taken this method as the best means of securing 
college support. More emphasis will he placed 
on subscriptions hereafter. This plan has 
worked very successfully in some of the east- 
ern colleges. 

The editorial game law, as stated in the Belle- 
ville (Kansas) Telescope, is as follows: "Book 
agents may be killed from March 1 to December 
1 ; spring poets, from March 1 to June 1; scandal 
mongers, from April 1 to February 1: umbrella 
borrowers from August 1 to November 1, and 
from February 1 to May 1: every man who ac- 
cepts a paper for one year, and, on being pre- 
sented with a hill, says, l I never ordered it,' 
may be killed on the spot, without reserve or 
relief."— Ex. 

Mark Twain says that some years ago,, when 

in the South, he met an old colored man who 

claimed he knew George Washington. "I 

asked him,'* relates the humorist, "if he was 

on the boat when George Washington crossed 

the Delaware, and he instantly replied: l Lor', 

inassa, I steered dat boat.' 'Well/ said I, 

' do you remember when George took the hack 

at the cherry tree?' He looked worried for a 

minute, and then with a beaming smile said : 

'Why, suah, massa. I dun drove dat hack 

mahsehV'V^x. ■ * 



116 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 




teams have regular 



Hlirh jrrades by seniors reached and kept. 
> „ Were not attained by main and mitrht. 
But they, while sophs and 1 reshtes slept. 

Were riding ponies in the nfffht. 
- . - _ - __ „ —llamu. Recorder. 

Go to Bardwell's for your hats. 

You can always find the latest styles at 
B&riwell's. 

Miss Olive Dunlap, '05, is visiting College 
friends this week. 

Viola Thompson received a visit from her 
mother last week. 

All the basket-ball 
practice once a week. 

The battalion had dress parade Friday for 
the first time this year. 

Miss Ester Christensen, of Randolph, visited 
College last Saturday. 

The "Hamp.-Io." Quartet sang in chapel 
last Saturday morning. 

Frank Sorgatz has returned to College, after 
an absence of two weeks. 

Reverend Thurston conducted chaoel exer- 
cises last Tuesday morning. 

Mr Baker, of Tescott, Kan., was visitin* 
friends and College last week. 

Miss Josie Holland spent Sundav in the 
country, at the home of Mrs. Hudson.' 

Reverend Thayer, of Topeka, gave a short 
talk last Saturday morning in chapel. 

The Websters played to a crowd of 500 peo- 
ple Saturday night in the College chapel. 

The senior girls are practicing basket-ball 
these days. Melick will coach them again. 

Miss Calvin is giving lectures at a number 
of towns in the western part of the State this 

The bids for the erection of the new hortlcul 

No«mU»r 4.^ ^ * ^^ °" Saturda -V- 

Assistant Seaton and one of bis squads in 
surveying II did some practical work for the 
farm Saturday. 

Luther Solt has dropped out of College on 
account of poor health, and is now visitin* 
friends in Missouri. T 9 

The Hamiltons and Franklins adjourned 

t« a ££ tK S V wK g S ° ^y '»Igrht have a chance 
to see the Web,. special.'* 

Mr, Wilson, freshman, had the misfortune 
of having one of his hands mashed in the 
gearing on the traction engine, last week. 



Miss Johnson, of the tfationdliitt force has 
resigned her position to take up a position with 
Superintendent Rickratfn, of the Printing De- 

pnrtment. * 

w3& * D ?J J% n Jolmso ^ of We stmoreland, 
Kan., visited College afid Manhattan friends 

Saturday and Sunday. Mrs. Johnson is a 
sister of Miss Alice Ipsen. 

Four couples of College students took their 
supper and sp.>nt the evening on Mt. Prospect, 
last Thursday evening, A jolly time is re- 
ported. No names are mentioned, by request. 

Some of the girls, with the help of the 
Misses Hopps. Tnayer, and Barbour, have 
organized a rooters' club for the girls. The* 
will attend the games in a body and do their 
utmost in yelling. 

Miss Gertrude Nicholson has accepted a no- 
sition in the Indian Schools at Pine Point 
Minn., and will leave for that place the first of 
next week Miss Blanche Williams, a former 
student, will fill the vacancy at Oak Grove. 

Some of the engineering boys are taking ad- 
vantage of the opportunity offered by the con- 
struction of the new Rock Island railroad 
bndge. They say that they get some good 
ideas by investigating the methods employed in 
handling the heavy material. 

Commencing this week, each Friday after- 
noon drill hour for the College cadets "will be 
devoted to battalion drills, dress parade, 
review, etc. Following the ceremonies the 
cadet band will give a short open-air concert. 
Drills commence at 2:45 p. M . Captain 
Shaffer reports the work of the cadets as 
highly satisfactory. 

•^fc S^, Hi l dreth ' Altamont, Kan., grower 
of the Bildreth corn," in writing to Professor 
PenEyck closes his letter thus: "If you are 
down in these parts, 'the latch string hamrs 
out. I wish our farmers knew the benefits to 
be derived from our Agricultural College at 
Manhattan, the most practical educational 
institution of any in the State." 

John S. Greenlund, short course last vear. 
writes to Professor TenEyck, thus: "I'wish 
that you could come up to CM if ton some Mon- 
day afternoon and deliver an address to mv 
friends on the 'Improvement of corn.' I will 
pay all bills myself, if you can come. My 
neighborhood needs some one to tell them about 
a higher class of farming." 

A number of professors and assistants have 
formed a class for the study of French and have 
engaged Asst. Geo. Jackson to instruct them. 
The class is composed of the following members: 
Professors Eyer, Popenoe, McKeeve? and Ham- 
ilton, Librarian Minis, Assistants Shaw, Tin- 
key, Barnes, Zeininger, Wood, Watkins, 
Loomis, and Mrs. Hamilton. 

The Hamilton Literary Societv will irive a 
special program in the old chapel Saturday 
evening. It promises'to satisfy all seekers of 
high-class entertainment. Lovers of music and 
of mirth should not fail to be present. The 
llamps. are awake this year and will prove 
iw&n ? tu ^ a y evening. Everybody come. 
Don t fail to hear the grand free concert before 
the program begins. Admission free to all 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



117 



t 

t 

t 
* 



■ 



Students, W e Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Pall arid Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 



Shoes repaired f 



\ yoii; service JOHN COONS Of COMSC wh „e yW , *..» , 



For style and prices go to Bardwell's. * 

The "Hort" gathered its celery this week. 

"Pat." Brown is able to be at classes again. 

Miss Weeks' mother is visiting her from Lin- 
coln. 

Hollows y is catching moles and gophers for 
the "Hort.'" 

The Ottawa Cnmpu* says that the Rooters' 
Club helped. 

Winifred Dalton went home Sunday morning, 
returning Monday. 

The program Tor the fall term appeared in 
the Industrial fat this week. ; * 

The residents of Col lego Hill expect to have 
a wolf hurt in the near future. 

J as. R. Coxen enjoyed a visit this week. Irom 
his old schoolmate, Mr. Rainard. ~- ; 

We give ten per cent off on all trimmed hats 
for spot cash, at Mrs. BardwelFs. • 

The carpenters' are repairing the floors in 
the engine-room and machine-shop. . 

A new steam turbine separator and a wash 
sink has been installed in Dairy Hall. 

Fred Wilson, '05, left the first of the week 
for his new work in Phoenix, Arizona. 

The egg-laying contest that has heen in prog- 
ress for several months closed Tuesday. 

The seniors are practicing football in prepar- 
ation for the annual senior-junior game. 

Archie Moore is making some of the charts 
that will be used on the corn special train. 

• The Military Department received a consign- 
ment of books from the War Department last 
week. 

Professor Kammeyer is enjoying a visit from 
his father-in-law, Mr. Samuel Weber, dt Kear- 
ney, Mo. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Barnes, of Blue Rapids, 
were here visiting their sister, Miss Gertrude 
Barnes, over Sunday. 

■ The pump in the pump- pit was broken last 
week, and as a result all machinery was stopped 
for a couple of hours. 

Professor Erf and. Mr. Hastings are making 
arrangements for the chicken show, to be held 
here December 12 to 16. 



Miss Minis is in Leavenworth this week, 
where she appears on the program of the State 
Librarians' Association meeting. 

Misses Palmer, Golden, and Alexander, 
teachers in the city schools, are taking special 
work at the College on Saturday. 

The second "Gleaner Division" of the Alpha 
Beta society was entert lined at the home of 
Miss Myrtle Kahl, Monday evening. 

Capt. Andrew S. Rowan, former comman- 
dant of cadets here, has been advanced to the 
rarik of major and assigned to the 25th Infan- 
try. 

Professor TenEyck is knocking on the Mon- 
day weather we have been having. He says 
that his department is getting behind in its 
work. 

Assistant Kyle will have charge of the Farm 
Department work and classes during the ab- 
sence of Professor TenEyck and Assistant 
Shoesmith. 

The stockholders in the Co-ops. derive bene- 
fits, the same as stockholders in other organi- 
zations. Shares, cash $1 per, and they pay 
dividends, too. . 

Professor Willard has a small book posted 
on the bulletin board of, the Physics building 
that is full of good common-sense. A page is 
turned each day. 

"Liffie" Patee, sophomore last year, now a 
student in the medical school at Topeka, writes 
that he enjoys the Herald more now than he 
did when here in College. 

The class in soil physics took a trip over the 
farm last Saturday and examined the various 
fields of fall grains with reference to their 
preparation and seed beds. 

Professor Melick says there is going to be 
trouble if people do not bring something to 
carry their milk in. He is going gunning for 
those who have milk bottles out and do not 
return them. 

The G. A. L. S. Club, a former organization 
of College girls, will give a seven o'clock din- 
ner to-morrow evening at the home of Cora 
(Ewalt) Brown, '98, in honor of Miss Olive 
Staatz. Mrs. Beulah (Brown) Hoffman and 
Miss Daisy Hoffman, of Enterprise, will be in 
town for the occasion. . 



118 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



s* 




ALUMNI Z 



m ^^v^A 



1 



C-nrt-VuVi 



(kt 



: \V/ W. tffoti field.' T <>5, is to char^o of the 
dairy herd for the Animal Husbandry Depart- 
ment. 

H. V. Harlan,' '04, is doin^ special work for 
the Farm D apartment along 1 fcha line of corn 
and seed selection. 

Edith McDowell: '5)3, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Ktingley) McDowell, of EilCnn, Colo., are 
Here visiting with Mrs. Ash ford ♦Stjingley. ■ 1 

\ Extract from a letter from St. R. Thatehar, 
'1)2 r "*Pk"ise send my Herald to box :j().) t 
Garden City, Kan. As to n?ws,. I ran across 
O. M. Goodrich, junior in '05, here in Garden 
City. He is thinking of going back to K. H. 
A. 0. in the near future. He says his sister 
Clara, '03, is not' teaching, but is at horns in 
Mankato this winter. At Halstead I met Les- 
lie Fitz, '02, who was enroute to Washington, 
D. C, from McPherson, where lie has b?en 
conducting wheat experiments for the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. I also mot Clara Barn- 
hisel, '04, who was home on a vacation frofn an 
Indian School in northeastern Iowa. From 
the looks of tilings I think the several short- 
course boys I met at Halstead are all A Ho. 1 
farmers and are making a succees of their busi- 
ness. Among them were J. A. Showalter. Roy 
Baumgartner, and Tip Lantis. The day I as 
there Mr. Showalter was running a steam plow, 
which indicate -i the type of fanners I mean b> 
A No. 1. I have m-?t several K. S. A. C. boys 
since returning to Kansas, but failed to make 
note of th?ir initials. If any K. S. A. C. 
alumni drop into Garden City this winter I 
hope they will call around. [The letter head 
says at the Ash Park Hotel.] Western Kansas 
has long bee.i in need of water and good citi- 
zens and we hope to be able to supply part of 
the water — at least eaough to make irrigation 
a success, as our business is the installation of 
centrifugal pumps in irrigating walla for al- 
falfa, sugar beets, orchards, etc." 



PROFESSIONAL. 



uvu u. a. tin si;, dentist. 

'M yeum ofconlinfloos practice should be convincing (or 
highest skill and perfection, 



Dr. M. J. JIIcKEE, DKNTJST. 



Work guaranteed. Ofllce in Huntress Buildiriir. 327Poyntz 
Ov'er the Star Grocery. Phones: Office 66; Res; 03. 



DK. J, E. TAYLOK, DENTIST. 



Booms | and 4 In Union National Bank Building Fine 
. ,'. , Kold work a specialty. 



;t— 



lies. Phone. Colt Su8 ■ , Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office In Union Natl, 
Bank Bldir., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 




g L"! g 



You, can 

get everything in 

Clothing , 



at 



COfYBOfT 1905 BY 
Ttt HOWt OF nuPPDWEMB 



KNOSTMAN'S 

Underwear, 

8Hoes, 

Hats 

and 

the greatest 

Suits & Overcoats 

ever 

seen in 

Manhattan. 



§ rooms and 3 tailors at 
your service 



ALSO A SHOEMAKER 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Ovmr Union National Bank. 



JECUb GROW 

Elevator on, C. R, I. & P, Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



AHingham & Beattie 

DEALERS m . . ,. 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J.Qi A, Shelden 

JEWELER and 



oimciAfc££L 



K. S. A. C. Plus. Watcft « Jew«r>l*eifa*riiis 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



119 



^ 



r 






M« 



~1 



On Saturday, Nov. 4, '05 

The Manhattan Candy Kitchen will 

sell their pure stick 
Candy 

2 Pounds for 25c 

And will make it while you 
wait. Come and see us make 
it. Don't forget the Date. 



i 



i 



...Manhattan Candy Kitchen... | 



u 



J 



r 



Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in «»d see our eight-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains. Prices, $1.00 and upward. 



*> 



Co-operative 



L 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention 

Chas. S. Jones, 



Manager 



Bookstore 



J 



I 



********* 




I The College Gro cery and Meat Market. 



Dealer in 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



1116 MoroSt. 
Phone 227 



We deliver 
goods promptly 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



iMM 



120 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



ja 




The Elk Barber Shop^ 



AND BATH ROOMS 

SIX BATHS FOR ONE DOLLAR. FINE LINE OF CIGARS 
.—____ * ND TOILET ARTICLES. RAZORS HONED. 

Pi BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 






ao nnnrinnf,nnwn i nn nn n nnn uuu uii | 



Students' Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 



Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 



227 Poyntz Avenue 




Special Rates to Students. 



* * . ^ .. 



Work Called For and 
Promptfy Delivered 



■ -■- 



Model Laundry 

nnvT c a. nti i n m. 



BOYLE 8, BELL, Propi 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 



411 Poyntz Avenue. 



Phone 74 



t^^ 



\ 

F 

I 






SHOES 

Of Style 



&S 



ervice 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 

Roberts & Ottowa ciothie7s 




F 

F 

i 



', 



150,000 Dairy Farmers are Going to be Added to the Big Army of More 

Than Six-hundred Thousand Users of 

|Yp I 3Yfl| Cream Separators 



During the Year 1905 



The all-important profit-earning', time-saving need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval is the original, and has for twenty -five years 
led in centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- 
ize the construction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modern improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars are to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval Separator Company 



Randolph and Canal Sts„ Chicago 



Now York 



, w ■ ^ J . 1 * 



t§ m M T ^ " ^M ." ** ^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^* * - 



f THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

=^^==JOHN PURCELL - = 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy 



Q 327 POYNTZ AVE. 
Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly 
to Any Part of the City . . . . 




College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confeotions... 



GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 

mOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPOOl 









1MB 



w^m^^ 



iUi< l-.-H -<i-ii< .„ - V-PF^Pq^p^B^^HB 




•5XS3K53KXXXX5SXXXXXW 



ELLIOT 



I 
I 

* 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X} 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 

Dairy Suits. X X;MU^M ' X 



WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * 

Our Urge experience in handling student trade during many 
year* enables ui to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



£ks 






.HMKMM'M'NiKiKWMMMK'H'ANHMH 



»MJ£j&M&&l£!ftSJftJ&J£M»*H***H******M; 



2} 
* 

* 
* 



s 

s 



Seasonable Goods 



Ladles' Underwear.— Warm Fleeced and Ribbed Underwear, both combina- 
tion Suits and separate Garments. La lea* Golf Gloves. — Wool and imported 
Mercerized in the latest shades. Shawls and Scarfs.— Knit Shawls, Fascina- 
tors and Newport Scarfs in Black, White and Dainty Tints. Ladles* and 
Men's Hosiery.— Ribbed and Fleece-Lined. 

Watch This Store for Holiday Goods, 

We are beginning 1 to open up the largest and most attractive line we have 
yet had of Toys, Fancy China, Silverware, Toilet Sets, Collar Boxes, Work- 
boxes, Handkerchief Boxes and Novelties of all kinds for Christmas trade, 
and from now on there will be something new to be seen every time you 

come in. 




S 



THE BIG RACKET 



*W**********^^^ 



1 




■ 1 1V 



-H*sa. m*\ 




HChe Students 1 Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





i 




l 









■- 






Keuffel & Esser 

« OP NBiitf YORK » 
813 Locust Street, Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paraaort" 
"key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



DRAWING 
PAPER8 

"Anvlt" 

"Duplex" 

"paraxon" 

"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS («&). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



- 



- 






Askren's 

Money Jar 

The Jeweler fr Optician, Manhattan, Kan, 



($ ® 6> 6) 

We havs placed 
hi our window 
■ far contain- 
ing a urn of 
monoy to be 
1 givon away 

FREE 

Him you 
It? — - 



Hat Pirn, Stick 



Fine, Solid-gold and 
Gold-filled Jewelry. 
Our store is filling* up 
every week with new 
and sparkling Jewelry. 
Fine Silk Umbrellas for 
Ladies and Gentlemen. 
Solid-silver Souvenir 
Spoons. When you 
buy anything in this 
store you do not have 
to select from a lot of 
old shop-worn goods. 
This is the up-to-date 
Jewelry Store where 
you find the new stock. 
Can sad 



ASKREN, 



The Jeweler 

and 
Optician 



Bilger's Hack 

AND 

Baggage Line 



Cab meets afl trams day 
andnight WiD call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable lor class 
parties, etc Charges 

X 



Phone 



226 












TT 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



121 



I 



Wolfs Cottage Studio 










' if ** " ■ ~" 


m3 ■ m0^^^^BSljH ^Bh. 




"M 


— Mr- J3IB «re ■ 


i ^ 










Opposite Carnegie Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



ME4F, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE - - - 33 

E B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



219 Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 

f ' 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 
the Wagons. . - Phone 157 

BOYS ! Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



00 TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, Wc 

offer you only the best X X 

W, M. STDSfGLEY & CO, 



122 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 



V®mtx£?r 



DEALE 



Dry "Goods Room, 

Dress Goods Id all varieties. 
Mohairs are much in evidence 
this season. Tennis Flannel, 
Shaker Flannel, Percales. Ging- 
hams, Cheviots, Cotton or Wool 
Blankets, Hosiery, Underwear, 
etc, 



ReadytOu'Wear Room. 

Tailor-Made Suits. Skirts, 
Shirt Waists, Muslin Underskirts, 
Infant's Caps, Aprons. Neck- 
wear In the newest styles, etc. 



Shoe Department. 

If you will mention the name 
of Krippendorff-Dittman when 
you come In to tret Ladies 1 
Shoes, or Rice A Hutchintr's and 
Bradley, Metcalf when you want 
Men's Shoes, you will get Shoes 
tbat not onlv fit well but will 
wear well and at reasonable 
price ', Gymnasium Slippers, 
Danie Green's Felt Shoes. 



Hardware Department. 

We sell the celebrated "Keen 
Kutter" Goods, such as Razors, 
Pocket-knives, Shears. Scissors, 



Axes, etc- Wilson Improved 
Air-tinrht Heaters, Laundry 
Stoves with Baking Ovens. 
Builder's Hardware, Paints, Oil 
and Window Glass. Stoves and 
Ranges. 



Grocery Room, 

A complete assortment o f 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
All Fruits and Vegetables in 
season. Murdock's Coffee. O. 
P. T. Extracts. 



Ouee ns war e , Glassware, 
Lamps, etc. Fancy China, 
Japanese Ware, 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Heady -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 

' * Courtney's Full- Vamp Shoes are Good 
Enough for Me." 



SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 



Kings 

Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



1 



Home-made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

-£===— MANUFACTURERS OF - - 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Mac Cultivators 
Safety Corn Harvesters, Little Wonder Churn* 
Perfection Lawn Swinifs, Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps, Structural Iron Work 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone «i 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

dea£erin 
FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 phone 55 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 




M 



wm 



■P 




Published 
ach Thursday Bv 
ie Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Motto:l^cBveiy0neCultivateHi3 Qiun Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., November 9, 1905. 



Number 9 



Victory No. 4 

In the hardest .fought game that has been 
seen at Athletic Park this season, our football 
team defeated the team from Fairmount College 
last Monday by a score of 11 to fi. Our team 
was somewhat weakened by the loss of Mallon 
and Cave, but the boys dug into every play 
with the same spirit they have shown all sea- 
son. The boys from Wichita were game to the 
last and really outplayed our boys during part 
of the second half. They are by far the best 
players who have opposed our team this season, 
and we were glad to win even by a small score. 
The game was a punting contest from the 
beginning to the end. In the first half the 
punts- were not especially frequent, but in the 
last half the ball changed hands at least fifteen 
times on punts. Captain Davis, of Fairmount, 
was particularly strong in this respect. 

For the College, the regular men played just 
as well as they always have. The line held 
together in good shape and fought till the 
last. Blake, at right end, showed up well, 
especially in breaking interference. Kirk 
played the same steady game at quarter, thatf 
he has in every game, as did also Nystrora 
and Scholz at half and full. Milligan, the 
new man who has been out to practice but two 
evenings, played left half. He doesn't get into 
the interference as he will in the next game, 
but he is fast and as gritty as they make them. 
For Fairmount, G. Solter was easily the 
star. He is perhaps the strongest back that 
has played against our boys this year. 
Belden at end and Burton at quarter were both 
good. 

FIRST HALF 

Davis kicked off for forty yards to Milligan, 
who returned the ball only a short distance. 
Nystrom made fifteen yards, Milligan and 
Walker made four each, and Scholz gained 



six. Then Nystrom made another gain of six 
yards, but Fairmount held for three downs and 
secured the ball. On the first play they 
fumbled and Ostlund fell on the hall. Nystrom, 
Scholz and Milligan took turn about in gain- 
ing, and they rapidly worked the ball down to 
the visitors' twenty-five yard line. Here G. 
Solter was hurt and replaced by A. Solter. 
Then the bucking again started and Blake, 
Milligan and Scholz worked the hall to the ten- 
yard line in three plays. It was Nystrora's 
turn again and he went through tackle for ten 
yards and a touch-down. The goal was not 
kicked, so the score was 5 to 0. 

Fairmount kicked off and the hall went over 
the goal line. Scholz touched it down and 
kicked off from the twenty-five yard line. 
Solter tried an end run, but Blake downed 
him with no gain. Davis tried a tackle buck, 
but Ostlund, Cooley and Blake stepped that, 
and he was forced to punt. Milligan returned 
ten yards. By line bucks and hurdles the ball 
was carried back for twenty-live yards, but 
Fail-mount held. Kirk tried to punt, but the 
pass was high and he was downed with no 
gain. Fairmount took the hall and by end 
runs gained a few yards. They punted to our 
one-yard line, and the ball went out of bounds. 
There was no return, so Scholz punted from 
behind our goal line. Fairmount couldn't 
gain, so the College took the hall. Our backs 
couldn't 1)0 stopped and they marched straight 
up the field for forty-five yards before having 
to punt. Fairmount secured the ball on our 
forty-yard line and on the first play they got 
away. They made a double pass and Belden 
ran seventy yards for a touch-down. Davis 
kicked goal and the score was « to 5 in favor 
of Fairmount. 

Scholz kicked off for thirty-five yards and 
there was no return. They tried an end run 



^^^ 



1*24 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



and a tackle buck and lost on each: Davis 
punted thirty-five yards, but Million caught 
the ball and brought it backthirty-eigh*; yards, 
Scholz made a couple of bucks and made good 
gains. Milligan circled end for eight yards, 
Scholz and Nystrom each made five yards, and 
then Nystrom went straight through Cooley for 
the second touch-down. Scholz kicked goal, 
making the score 11 to (>. 

Davis kicked over the goal line so Scholz 
punted from the twenty-five yard line. Cooke 
tried our left end, but lie lost threa yards. 
Solter did the same on our right end, only he 
lost seven yards. They punted for forty yards 
just as time was called, 

SECOND HALF 

Scholz kicked off for thirty yards and tire 
ball was returned five. The visitors saw that 
it was no u-e to try to gain, so they punted 
thirty -five yards and Milligan returned the 
ball one-third of the distance. Walker, Scholz 
and Milligan made gains through our right end 
and Nystrom around the left. The College was 
penalized ten yards for being offside, so Scholz 
punted to the four-yard line. The ball changed 
hands several times by punts. Neither side 
could gain by straight football, hut Bel den 
made thirty yards on a delayed pass. The ball 
was lost on downs and punted to Farrmount's 
three-yard line. Our boys were offside on the 
next play, so the visitors received five yards. 
They began to ginger up here and tore through 
our line for good gains. By hard work they 
worked the ball down to our thirty-yard line. 
From this point Davis tried for a field goal 
but missed. The remainder of the half con- 
sisted mostly of an exchange of punts between 
Scholz and Davis, with the honors in favor of 
the latter. Each side would receive the ball, 
try a "couple of plays, and then punt. Fair- 
mouut had a beautiful assortment of fakes, 
but they didn't work. Time after time their 
men were downed for losses, but they always 
did well in punting. The half ended with the 
ball in our possession in Fairmount's territory. 

The line up : 

Paib mount. College. 

Davis ( Capt.) C Whipple 

Plank R. G Ostlund 

Nelson L. G — ., Wilber 

Isely *R. T Cooley 

Burton. F L. T Montgomery 

Belden . . . . R. E Blake 

Kirk L. E Walker 

Burton Q Kirk 

Solter. G.; Solter. A R. H Nystrom 

Cooke L. H Millitfun 

Bates F, (Capt.) Scholz 

Officials: Booth and Eberhart. 



Neglect of the finishing touch is a fault not 
easily mended, — Ex. 



The Football Reception 

After the football game with FairmonnOast 
Monday the two Rooters' Clubs joined hands 
in entertaining both football teams in Kedzie 
Hall. Although the reception was hastily ar- 
ranged, the rooms were made attractive with 
sofas, rocking-chairs, a quantity of sofa pil- 
lows, and decorations of the Fairmourit yellow 
and black, and our own purple. 

After the entrance of the Fairmount team, 
which was greeted with cheers, a short pro- 
gram was opened with a piano solo by Miss 
Hilliard. This was followed by one of Miss 
Barbour's famous Indian-club exhibitions, and 
then Mr. Melick gave the address of welcome. 
After this a quart?t composed of Misses Lyman 
and Amos, and Messrs. Farrar and. Roberts, 
entertained us for a little while. Following 
this Captain Scholz toasted the Fairmount 
boys, and Captain Davis responded. The last 
number was a song by the Fairmount team. 

After the program, punch and wafers were 
served, and then, after a short period of gen- 
eral amusement, the grand exit was made, ac- 
companied by mingled cheers for Fairmount 
and K. S. A. C. m. e. t. 

Alpha Betas 

The A. B's. were doing business at the old 
stand, as usual, Saturday. The president 
rapped for order at 2:30, and society opened 
with a song and devotion, after which Misses 
Vahlgren and Edna and Estella Soupene were 
initiated. 

The program consisted of a talk, a paper, 
and a declamation by Nannie Cam ah an, Bessie 
Parks, and May O rifling, respectively, and a 
painfully tiresome book review by ono of the 
male members whose name we refrain from 
mentioning, out of consideration for his feel- 
ings. 

Music was furnished by Miss Vahlgren ac- 
companied by Viola Thompson, and Mr. 
Oteyza accompanied by Miss Blanche Evans, 

The business session was short but interest- 
ing, and for the first time in several weeks we 
reached the head of adjournment. pat. ' 



lonlans 

Pres. Mattie Pittman called th.3 society to 
order and Gertrude Lill played for our open- 
ing song, after which Edith Forsyth led in 
devotion 

Roll-call was answered with quotations from 
Tennyson. The first number was a vocal solo 
by Dollie Ise. Kate Alexander then intro- 
duced her sister, Miss Clara Ahxander, who 
entertained the society with a reading. This 
was very much appreciated as it was something 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



1*25 



out of th? ordinary and was well rendered. 
Mable Dana read a good "Oracle." Edna 
Jones then played for us. The last number on 
the program was a question-box which 
contained many instructive questions hut dis- 
played cur lack of knowledge on some of the 
important questions of the day. 

.Business was not rushing, probably from the 
effects of mid-term. . 

Hamps. 

In spite of the rainy and stormy weather, «the 
old Chapel was nearly filled with people anx- 
ious to hear the concert given by the minstrels. 
The program consisted of vocal solos, music 
by the band, Mandolin Club, quartet and in- 
strumental solos. The entertainment proved a 
success and the program was much enjoyed by 
all. We will not be surprised at any time to 
hear of this troupe going on the road. 



V. W. C. A. 

The regular Saturday noon meeting of last 
week was made a recognition service. Sixty- 
two new members were taken into the associ- 
ation, making the total enrolment for this 
term one hundred eighty-nine. 



More than Phased 

The patrons of the College Lecture Course are 
unanimous in saying that the Jackson-Sammis 
Company was even better than they expected. 
A moderately well- filled house greeted the per- 
formers Tuesday evening, and that they ap- 
preciated the work of the musicians was shown 
by the applause and the repeated encores. Every 
number was a good one and each member of 
the company is an artist. It would be a hard 
matter for one to lean far toward * ' favoritism, ' ' 
but the modest little violinist seems to have 
won a place in the heart of every listener. We 
would like to hear her again. The closing 
number, a duet, "Now, Thou Art Mine For- 
ever, " by .Miss Sammis and Mr. Clarke, was 
especially fine, finishing An excellent program 
and leaving the people hungry for another. 

The Sheep-skin And the Pig-skin 

Bv C E. Whipple, in the Hamilton Society. Saturday. 
October 14. 1905 

Mary had a little lamb, or maybe it wasn't 
Mary's. It doesn't matter. The important 
fact is that it was a lamb. It used to frolic on 
green and velvety pastures in the golden hours 
of summer, or in the less golden hours when 
nature was giving it a bath to polish its fleece 
to a glistening white. Its life was not event- 
ful, but there was a prophetic incident one 
night when a gang of marauding wolves sur- 
rounded the fold and mingled their harsh, un- 
musical yaps with the plaintive cry of the 



bleating sheep. It seems that some day in the 
future this incident will be re-enacted some way 
at some place. How, we can not tell. 

In direct contrast to the beautiful lamb, in a 
pen made of patched-up pieces of corn-crib 
and old feuces which had existed and disinte- 
grated, in a pen which boasted no such attrac- 
tions as a grassy slope or a shady dell, but 
whose chief luxury was a bath of varying 
contents and mixture, lived a pig, not poetical 
as the lamb, but prosaic and homely, being 
maltreat?d at various times. On some days he 
was so fortunate as to gain an exit from his 
antiquated domicile only to l>e run down by 
the farm wagon or driven by a pack of howl- 
ing dogs to .his abode. Some old owls saw 
also in his checkered and abused existance a 
prophesy some day to be lived over again. 

The lamb has passed away, likewise the pig, 
but their influence never. The lamb's epi- 
dermis, divested of its snow ileec?, appears in 
K. S. A. C, and we see it mounted on a lofty 
standard and decorated by the symbols of the 
Rooters' club of K. S. A. C, including the 
likeness of our almost forgotten pig. While 
clustering around the standard we see the 
cheering and frantic members of the club whose 
banner it is. 

But why the frenzied yells? See, in the pen 
is our pig in his New Jerusalem made of wire 
netting, but the bath is absent and our pig is in 
the form of a much -abused oval over which 
twenty-two men struggle and sweat. It is 
scarred and grimy, but staunch and lasting. 

The picture of the diseased pig high on the 
banner waves triumphantly over the throng and 
the knights of the sheep-skin, and the knights of 
the pig-skin are bent on a common purpose for 
the honor of K. S. A. C. Which is greater, 
you ask? Neither. Alone they must meet de- 
feat; united they are sure of victory. Here's to 
the pig-skin and the sheep-skin. May they 
never be disgraced at old K. 8. A. C. 

Eleven muv follow the pitt-skin. 

Hard may they tljrht and well. 
But scores may follow the sheep-skin 

And cheer them by yell on yell. 
And the famous knijrhts of the pis-skin. 

Will win for K. S. A. C. 
If the loyal boys of the sheep-skin. 

Will veil for K. S. A. C. 



tie Thought it Wasn't 

"Papa," said a little boy, "is Rotterdam 
swearing?" 

"No," was the answer, "that is the name of a 
city in Holland. Why?" 

"Well, "said the boy, "Fannie Jones ate some 
of my candy to-day, and I told her I hoped it 
would rot-ter-daro teeth out." 



Haskell Indians one week from to-morrow. 



126 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LfTCvtBY 
One CvirrvATe Hi* 
Own Qcnh* •-*-• 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kun., as secoml- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies. Hve_ cents. 

F. A. Kiene. Jr. ,'06 Edltor-in-chler 

H. R. Hkim. "(10 Business Manager 

E. C. Farkar. 07 Literary Editor 

G. C. Kahl. 07 iKical Editor 

Mattik Pittman. 'iw Exchange Editor 

Carrol Walker. '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

.f. S. MoNTfioMBRY. '07 Subscription Manager 

ItifflSN?} *mm.lm*imm 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen. *08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to. tbe business 
man Hirers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the edltor-in-chiefs hook not late-* 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully ren nested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, "04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Nov. 0, 1905. 




The girls' Rooters' Club is now well organ- 
ized and has been aetive in insuring a pleasant 
time for the visiting team this week. We 
think this movement a good one and are cer- 
tain that it will engender good feeling and do 
much to make our College athletics clean, 
pure, and pleasant. 



We dislike to make the editorial columns 
bristle with knocks, but it is necessary that 
we enlarge upon a few incidents that do not 
meet our approval. It was our good fortune 
to win from St. Mary's in a hard, clean game 
that demonstrated our ability to play good 
ball under adverse conditions. This should 
have satisfied us as a student body; but we 
find that many students . followed the van- 
quished team to hoot and annoy them. This 
would have been inexcusable had they played 
a dirty game, and when played as they played 
it is much more so. The St. Mary's rooters 
probably started the trouble, but we must 
remember that we had something to lose— the 
reputation of a hospitable and good-natured 



student body— while they had nothing. It 
would be much more to our credit to gather 
round the opposing team and to cheer tliem to 
the echo. This would make for us an enviable 
reputation over the State and insure good treat- 
ment for our boys while away on trips. Our 
Rooters' Club is doing a good work, but it will 
be very easy for careless and rowdy conduct to 
counteract its effects. It is in the power of a few 
who have opinions on this subject to do a good 
work in preventing the "jollying" from being 
carried too far. The St. Mary's Stur gives us 
credit for being "the worst ever," both as stu- 
dents and football players: but of course we may 
take a grain of salt with this. Such reports 
are, however, credited by a few and we should 
be careful and thoughtful in all that we do at 
the games. 

Very unfortunate were some of the incidents 
of last Saturday's chapel session, and it is not 
with pleasure that we speak of any of them. It 
is unnecessary for us to condemn the practice 
of hissing, for no tli inking person can counte- 
nance such expression of opinion or feeling. 
It immediately brands the man as decidedly 
low and vulgar, or else very thoughtless and 
inconsiderate. We wish to speak of one or 
two other phases of this recent unpleasantness. 
If those who took part in the hissing made the 
mistake of thinking that the suspension was 
made with pleasure and to strike a direct blow 
at our College athletics, those who think the 
students hold that a football player should be 
exempt from rules and under no obligation to 
his college are equally at fault. We do believe 
in pure athletics, in honor and manliness, and 
we do care for the fellows more than for their 
victories, and the man who thinks or speaks to 
the contrary is doing an injustice. We regret 
that some few will ha antagonized by this un- 
pleasantness at a time when our athletic move- 
ment needs the hearty support and sympathy 
of every one in College. We think also that 
some plain and open criticism may not come 
amiss. First, we wish to criticise the students 
for thoughtlessly following a leader with no 
thought of propriety or future consequences. 
There seems to be a lack of spontaneity in our 
actions, and of seriousness in our thought. 
Secondly, we can see only one argument for the 
practice of reading suspensions and other pun- 
ishments in chapel. The rules are published 
and are known by all. We know that viola- 
tion of rules mests with punishment. For the 
great majority of us there is no need of rules, 
for we believe in doing the right thing ; we be- 
lieve in "the fair deal." Public suspensions 
can only frighten the weak person into obedi- 
ence to rules and the persistant lawbreaker will 




wmm 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



127 



depend upon evading 1 the law. We can do very 
"well without either class, for what we want 
here are boys and girls of principle, honest 
and upright. It gives no one pleasure to hear 
suspensions and can only lead to misunder- 
standing and mistakes. Thirdly, we are rather 
idealistic in our views and believe that those 
in authority, l>efore they condemn, should try 
to mould the man. An instructor who deliber- 
ately and from choice seeks to make life miser- 
able for the student deserves the severest criti- 
cism. We do not excuse any wrong aetion, 
but we do believe in self scrutiny. 



Are you interested in the Herald? If you 
are, prove it. Look over its pages for last 
week and you will see about eight inches of 
space filled with miscellaneous matter pertain- 
ing to nothing in general or particular that 
interests K. S. A. C. students. Of course, these 
squibs are selected to please you, but we know 
that they are not what you want to read. Dur- 
ing the past week several parties have been 
held, with no notice made in the College weekly. 
We are satisfied that this is what Herald 
readers wish to see, but as the Herald is not 
represented at all affairs depend ance on those 
that do attend must be our resort. If you think 
any item worth mentioning, sit down and write 
about it in a breezy and interesting manner 
and then hang it on the editor-in-chief's hook. 
In a short time a box marked Herald will be 
placed in the hall for your convenience, and in 
this all articles, squibs and locals may be de- 
posited. Other papers on our exchange list 
exhibit plainly in their pages the interest of the 
whole student body, and the Herald will not 
be at its best until such int?rest and attention 
is given it. It is not right that the staff should 
bear all the burden of the issue. Further, we 
might announce for general benefit that there is 
a large sign in the office which reads as fol- 
lows: "Write large and plainly. Paper is 
cheap. Poor copy must he rejected." The 
Herald has no typewriter and must either dis- 
card the article or hunt up some one to prepare 
it for the compositor's hook. A little care and 
attention in this particular will save the editor 
several steps, considerable time and worry, 
and perhaps a "cussing." 



Mary's father was trying the experiment of 
raising chickens with an incubator in his 
barn. The neighbors were much interested in 
this experiment, and meeting Mary one of 
them asked, "Mary, have you any little chick- 
ens at your house yet?" "No, but we're ma- 
kin' some," replied the little maiden.— Lippen- 
cott'*. 




If you have a kick coming, play foo.tball. — 
Ex. 

We see people not as they are, but as we 
are. 

Stanford University has a football squad of 
146 men. 

If you are disappointed in the school, remem- 
ber it is far more disappointed in you.— Ex. 

California University has organized a pistol 
club for the boys and a fencing club for the 
girls. 

At present the different universities of the 
United States rank as follows in size: Harvard, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Columbia, Illinois, Wis- 
consin, Cornell.— i?x. 

Michigan will be unable to finish Ferry Field 
this year on account of lack of funds. When 
completed, Ferry Field will be one of the finest 
equipped athletic fields in the west.— Ex. 

Work is not a curse, but a blessing. It is 
not a mark of servitude, but an insigna of roy- 
alty. It is a birthright of divine inheritance 
coming not as a priviledge to a favored few but 
as a free and happy" blessing alike to king and 
peasant. — Ex. 

Out of 1800 students who applied for admis- 
sion into Cornell this year, only 1000 were 
allowed to enter, and even once admitted, 
President Schurman announced to the stu- 
dent body, did not insure they were there to 
stay. He' advised the freshman to get a hard 
chair, to go into the garret and "grind." 

Many comments come to us upon the improve- 
ment of the Kansas University this year with 
regard to the rowdyism usually shown by the 
students. Much of the credit of this is given to 
Chancellor Strong. All this is in decided con- 
trast to the "college spirit" that prevails in 
some of our other prominent institutions of 
to-day. 

The faculty of Nebraska University has 
made it an annual affair to give a performance, 
somewhat similar in nature to a carnival, for 
the benefit of the College Settlement. This 
College Settlement was begun about six years 
ago and since that time has been dependent 
upon the University. This method has been 
adopted for the raising of funds and has 
proved remarkably successful. 






128 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



TTTT7~- 




Slnj* a sons of touch-downs: 

A (litrskiu full of air: 
Two and twenty ulutofers, 
Withlonjr unci matted ha'r. 
When the trume wan open, 

Slujorers Van to iljrht; 
Wasn't that for tender maids . . 

An edlfjiriK slirht? -Jta 

Try Fisher's Pantatorium. 

Victor Omen spent Sunday with home folks 
near Randolph. 

The stone-masons are rapidly erecting the 
new hoiler-room. 

C. E. Wilson, freshman, enjoyed a visit from 
his father this waek. 

The Faculty played basket-hall in the Gym. 
Saturday afternoon. 

Miss Mary S trite, '0f>, was visit inpr friends 
at College last week. 

Charley Johnson, '06, visited Manhattan 
friends over Sunday. 

Fury, vvho pitched baseball once in awhile 
last spring, was around College last week. 

A large numlwr of visitors were on the 
campus last Friday, watching the dress parade. 

Assistant Anderson, of the Physics. Depart- 
ment, was unable to b3 at College last Thurs- 
day. 

Miss Tillie Kammeyer returned from Kansas 
City, last . Wednesday where she has been 
visiting. 

Professor Erf, of the Dairy Department, is 
away on institute work. He will be gone for 
two weeks. 

Geo. A. Dean, '95, and Minerva (Blachly) 
Dean, '(XI, are the happy parents of a little 
daughter. 

Esther. Christensen, sophomore last year, 
visited with her brother, J. C. Christensen, a 
few days last week. 

The latest club to be organized is "The In- 
candescent Club.'* Its membership is limited 
to red-headed people. 

The Printing Department, last week, worked 
until eleven o'clock several evenings to get 
over several rush orders. 

Only two' more football games on the regular 
schedule. We have a fighting chance for both, 
if every one does his duty. 

Assistant Jackson, of the Department of 
German, is a cornet soloist. He is practicing 
with the band in the afternoons. 

Our football team and the team from Faii- 
mount University, were entertained in the Gytr. 
Monday evening, by the two Rooters' clubs. 



Merton Johnson, junior in '99, and family 
visited around College last Saturday. Mr. 
Johnson is county treasurer of Pottawatomie 
county,. '""•', ,....■■ 

The building committee of the Board of' 
Regents visited chapel Saturday morning. 
They have given the contract for the new 
Horticulturalbuilding. 

The class in general physics has" be.'n led 
to believe that their knowledge of the subject 
varies directly as the distance between them- 
selves and the professor. 

Professor Scheffer and Charles Popenoe, '05, 
have returned from gathering specimens for the 
Department of Entomology and Zoology. 
Barber county was the field of operation. 

The Dairy Department has' received two new 

cream separators from the Sharpless Company. 
One will be run by hand, and a 2-horse-power 
engine has been purchased to run the other. .. 

If the parties who took that overcoat off a 
hook in the boy's dressing room will return it 
to that hook by Saturday morning no ques- 
tions will be asked, I know who you are. — 
Owner. 

The Pantatorium— what is it? It is the place 
where you can get four suits pressed, and a 
shine every day in the month, for a dollar. 
See Fisher, the proprietor, over Harrison's 
grocery. 

The Board of Regents were in session last 
Saturday. J3ids for the new Horticultural 
building were opened and Wm. Stingley, of 
Manhattan, was given the contract. His bid 
was $35,308. The contractcalls for the complex 
tion of the building by September 1, 1906. 

Despite the stormy weather Saturday even- 
ing, the old chapel was crowded with visitors 
to the Hamilton society. The program was 
the best' ever given by any society, and was a 
little out of the ordinary run of programs. 
The main feature was the music, furnished by 
the'ir "Minstrel Band." 

Miss Mary Kimble entertained a number of 
her friends at a Hallowe'en party, at her home 
Monday evening. The evening was pleasantly 
spent in a Hallowe'en manner and a Hallowe'en 
lunch was served. Invitations were extended 
to Misses Lulu Rannells, Blanche Robertson, 
Eleanor March and Marie. Coons and Messrs. 
Sol. Whitney, Clarence Foltz, Hubert Popenoe, 
and Sol, Cunningham. 

Prof. B. F. Eyer received a letter recently 
from the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, New York. The letter was to the 
effect that the College had been * 'placed upon 
the list of institutions of learning eligible to 
present students in competition for the Edison 
gold medal," which was originated by the 
American Institution in honor of Thomas A. 
Edison, and for which contestants present a 
thesis on a subject assigned. This honor 
places the College electrical engineering 
course on an equal basis with those of Purdue, 
Armour, Cornell, Boston Institute of Technol- 
ogy, and others. It comes as a result of 
investigations on the part of our institution 
which have been going on for several months. 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



129 



Elizabsth Randle visited homo folks at Bala 
ovor Sunday, • . ; 

Tiro flnnl st?am filling; trite mad^ionhh? new 
boilers Mod day.' 

Professor' Popcnon ii awn you tea Missouri 
Pacific institute train. 

Miss Josephine Walter showed a gentleman 
visitor around College last Saturday. 

' ! Miss Amy Elder ii assisting in the Experi- 
ment Station office on Mondays at present. 

The Mechanical Department is, working on- 
some- .lathes, to he u;sed in* the pattern simp: 

» Cail Miller,, of. last spring's baseball team, 
visited Opllega last week and saw our hoys de- 
feat St. Mary's. 

The local editors are grateful for not Iteing 
kicked out when they "butt in" at the various 
offices around the campus. 

Rumor says that the juniors are going to 
win in the senior-junior football game. Rumor, 
in this Case,' was a junior. 
' The" Farm Department is working on two 
bulletins, one relating to soil experiments and 
the other to soil moisture studies. . 
■ The Univ^'dsy of Colorado has written to 
the Athletic Association wanting a game of 
basket-ball hers about the first of the year. • 

Did you se3 the hand at the game Monday? 
They did fine work and to them, and the 
Rooters' Clubs belong a lot of credit for 
helping to win the game. 

The Manhattan Hepuhlk has b-en purchased 
by the Kimball brothers. Ned W., '02, and C. 
A., *9X They will have their hands full editing 
the three weekly and one daily edition. . . 

H. G. McCormick, brother of Prof. E-. B. 
McCormick, will locate in Manhattan in the 
near future. He will hang out his shingle at 
the Union National Bank building, as a dentist. 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering 
is to have a new assistant, to take the place 
made vacant by the resignation of Chas. Dear- 
born. Mr. M. P. Thomas, of the Oklahoma 
Agricultural College, has accepted the position 
and will be' here by January 1. 

The Music Department is making prepar- 
ations for their annual Music Festival, to he 
iriven in the Auditorium -some time during the 
winter term. The contemplated program will 
include several choruses by a Choral Lmon of 
one hundred voices, a number of pieces by the 
College Glee Club, a male quartet, and several 
instrumental pieces. 

The resident Alpha' Beta alumni of Manhat- 
tan have organized and will meet monthly 
hereafter. They plan to establish a regular 
head-quarters, employ a secretary, ^d include 
all A B. alumni in the membership. The first 
meeting was held in October, * . L.. J g J 
of Kansas City, sang a solo and J. T. Willard. 
'8.1, gave a thirty-minute talk on London. 
Emma (Knostman) Huse, '80, will give an 
address on Russia at the November meeting. 
The officers are, F. A. Marlatt, ^president, 
Marian Allen, '04, vice P re " d ?SL£ * .Jo 
Ridenour, '&», treasurer \ Josepbme Finly, w r 

secretary. 



2£ ALUMNI Z 



G »orge Greene, '00," was about College last 
week. 

Mary Strite, '05, visited friends in Manhat- 
tan over Sunday. 

GUck Fockcle, '02, is running the LeRoy 
Reporter, formerly owned by his father. 

• Chris. Johnson, '95, reports a very success- 
ful season as a breeder of Hereford cattle at 
Success. Kan. 

L. C. Chase, sophomore in '02, is with the 
battleship Ohio, and has recently been in the 
harbor at San Francisco. 

A. J. Reed, a former member of the class of 
'05, is at work about the campus and expects 
to be in College next term. 

A. J. Reed, junior last year, is back in Col- 
lege again. He left last winter term to accept 
a position in Alabama. Lately he has been 
working in Oklahoma. 

W. Handley, short-course student in '03, 
visited the institute cars at Leoti. Kan., last 
week while on his way to California with a car 
of grade Pereheron horses. 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss 
Olivia Staatz and Mr. Chas. Reimold, at En- 
ter prise, November 15. They will be at home 
in Solomon after December 1. 

We learn through H. D. Matthews, '04, that 
Ed. Adamson. '05, who is with the General 
Electric Company at Schenectady, N. Y., is 
suffering with a severe attack of typhoid 
pneumonia. , . . 

R. C. Faris, '01, and Miss Eurie Murray, 
both of Upper Alton, III., were married at 
Sparta, 111.. October 10. After a short trip 
they returned to Upper Alton, wh-re they aYe 
now at home. 

V. L. Cory, '01, now at the wheat station at 
McPherson,' helped with the institutes at Linds- 
borg and Geneseo last week. He will soon re- 
port to Washington for winter work, but ex- 
pects to return in the spring. 

H. I. Floyd, sophomore in '02, is serving 
his second term as register of deeds in Ness 
county. He savs after this year he will quit 
politics and tend to his piece of land, which 
raised six thousand bushels of wheat this year. 

E, H. Hodgson, "03, of Little River, is win- 
ning fame as an apple grower of the West. 
We can understand why he wrote that he hadn t 
time to attend the institutes near there when 
we know that his apple wagons may lie seen for 
a radius of fifty miles around the farm. 

Frank K. Dawley, *05, was one of the ra ">.& 
who had the nerve to buy 1400 acres of 
Osborne countv land during the hard times. 
He is now one "of the most successful raisers 
of Poland-China hogs in this part of the 
eountrv and has been recently conducting a 
sale at" which the average price per head was 
fifty dollars. 



130 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



I 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



Shoes repaired 
while you wait 



Additional Local 

K. U. plays Washburn Saturday. 

The prayer-meeting topic for this evening's 
meeting- at the Y. M. C A. parlors is, "Should 
I Judge Another?" Mr. Wear is leader. All 
young men are invited to be present. 

The general expression of opinion among 
the Fairmount football men after the reception 
was that the K. S. A. C, students have the 
right spirit and that their visit was made 
even more pleasant than a victory could have 
made it. 

On last Monday evening Mrs. Cooper enter- 
tained a small party of young people, for her 
daughters Allan and Kate. After a delightful 
evening spent in music, cards and taffy pull- 
ing, a dainty lunch was served, and the young 
folks departed uniting in declaring Mrs. 
Cooper a most delightful hostess. Those 
present were: The Misses Lill, Marty, Allan 
and Kate Cooper, Messrs. Burton, Burtner, 
Swingle, Seaton, and Lawson. 



Chapel Statistics 

Since the chapel-roll has been posted and the 
students are expected to sit in certian seats in 
the Auditorium, certian thoughtful persons 
have wondered if the Faculty mem lie rs attend 
chapel as regularly as they might. To decide 
this point one serious-minded senior has taken 
it upon himself to compile a few statistics as to 
the number of people who regularly sit on the 
rostrum during chapel exercises. 

According to the Industrinlijtt the Board of In- 
struction consists of seventy-nine members. Of 
this number three are absent on leave, and by 
the nature of their work five are unable to attend 
chapel, making a total of seventy-one who might 
att mhI. In comparison let us consider the ac- 
tual attendance. For instance, on the five days 
from October 20 to 26, inclusive, the attendance 
for these days were respectively 24, 25, 14, 25, 'and 
28, an average daily attendance of 23.2 and a 
total number of 116. Total number absences, 239. 



"The percentage of attendance for the diffe.- 
ent departments was as follows: 

Per cent. Per cent 

Executive , . ..'0 Chemistrv 46 

Architectural 80 Entomol/& Zool.. ,. 6 

Domestic Science. ... 10 Physical Science. ... 

Veterinary Science.. History 70 

German 20 Mathematics 55 

Dairy Animal Husbandry.. 40 

Agriculture 13 Preparatory 45 

Printing 20 Physics... . ! 6 

Military 80 Botanical 6 

Mechanical 20 Horticulture 

English 60' Philosophy. .. . , . . . .100 

Library 46 Music 80 

Economics 60 

"It will be noted that four departments, viz., 
Physical Science, Veterinary Science, Dairy 
Husbandry, and Horticulture, have no repre- 
sentation. Who knows what the result might 
D3 if the students would -see a larger number 
of their instructors before them evory morn- 
ing?" One of the >06 Boys. 



riiOFESSrONAL. 



Dl«. G. A. CIU3E, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfectiun. 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DlvNTIST. 



Work jruaranteea. Office in Huntress Buildintr. 327Poyntz. 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Office GC; Res, 63. 



DU. J. E. TAYLOlt, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Unloo National Bank Buildlnjr. Pine 
Kold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave HO 

Dn Colt & Cave. 



Offlc j in Union Natl. 
Bank Uldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



131 



-n 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies*. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies 



_4i 



I 



Phone 167 




«■ »■■ 



Oysters 



w 



All Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



I 



F 



. • t Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUntailK ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 




J 



r 



Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in and see our eight-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains, Prices, $1.00 and upward. 



"% 



Co-operative 



v., 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention 

Chas. S. Jones, 



Manager 



Bookstore 



J 



*4 il ?* +*****+* *+*4 *+** **+*4^**4tt±4* * ** * **&**A^**********^*^** 






t 
« 



* 
1 






The College Grocery and Meat Market. 

Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



We deliver * 

foods promptly & 



* KSasr* JOHN F. HARRISON 



a. 
ft. 



ft 
ft 

| 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



132 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



Students ' Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS df± 


Special Rates to Students, Work Called For and 

Promptly Delivered 


ssis (9 


Model Laundry 

BOYLE flr BELL, Props, 


PHOTOS ^KW 


t 

EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 


227 Poynu Avenue 


411 Poynti Avenue. Phone 74 


Allingham & Beattie 


Western Poultry Review 



DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUT! BR- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch &. Jewelry Repairing 



Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year, 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Ovmr Union National Sank. 

OClIL/O GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo- T- Fielding & Sons. 

Office 11345 N. Second St 



tym*** 



5 



j SHOES 



J 



Of Style 
& Service 



9 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT i 



THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 



Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You J 

i 

Roberts & Ottowa^5||||~ i 

¥ 
4 






m 



160,00^ Mrjr #artfier» are Gofatt to be Added to the BitfAmy etf 1«ot« 

Than Six -hundred Thousand Users of 

F)fi Lsvfll Cream Se P arators 

■ ===== During the Year 1901 ■ ' '— 

The all-important proflt-«araing, tim&-saving need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval la the original, and has for twenty-five years 
led hi centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- , 
ize the ooDStruction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modem improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
f rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits Were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars art to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval 



PhwYNt 



THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

rniin PURCELL ============= 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 

t ■ 

327 POYNTZ AVE. 



Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly 
to Any Part of the City . . . . 



College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLA SS BOARD 

• ■■ — > ■"■ ■■ ■ 

Meats and Luncha*. Short cjfdere 
"oyatars. Soda*, and Confection*... 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 









- 




WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits an<£Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING 

Our large experience in handling student trade during 
jean enable* us to meet their wants exactly. X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



4fttttt*********ftft**ft«XX«3aaiiai^ 



r 



■y.^-^-^.^^^-^.^-^-^-^-^^».^.^j^-^-^-^^^. 



Seasonable Goods 




Ladles' Underwear.— Warm Fleeced and Bibbed Underwear, both combina- 
tion Suits and separate Garments. La lea' Golf Gloves. — Wool and imported 
Mercerized in the latest shades. Shawls and Scarfs.— Knit Shawls, Fascina- 
tors and Newport Scarfs in Black, White and Dainty Tints. Ladies' and 
Men's Hosiery*— Ribbed and Fleece-Lined. 

Watch This Store for Holiday Goods, 

We are beginning to open up the largest and most attractive line we have 
yet had of Toys, Fancy China, Silverware, Toilet Sets, Collar Boxes, Work- 
boxes, Handkerchief Boxes and Novelties of all kinds for Christmas trade, 
and from now on there will be something new to be seen every time you 
come in. 



THE BIG RACKET 



itt^****************tt*1 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



188 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 




h5 




m s tit j? 



•< 



- 



P i^j**;.**K»bv 



Opposite Carnegie Library 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay uh 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * in- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo. N. Y., Atlanta. 
Oa., La Crosse, Wis., Texarlcana, Tex,, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. F0R F,NE W0!?K AND PR0MPT DEL,VERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

Special Prices to Students 

_' = 33 the Wagons. = . ■ 



PHONE 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



R B. ELLIOTT 



REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS G0 TO 

a 1 1) Poy nt/, Ave., Man ha tt an, K a n . 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine iinecigarsana toilet articles 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. X- A^ 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO. 



134 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry "Goods Room. 

Dress Goods in all varieties. 
Mohairs are much in evidence 
this season. Tennis Flannel. 
Shaker Flannel. Percales. Ging- 
hams, Cheviots, Cotton or Wool 
Blankets. Hosiery. Underwear, 
etc, 



Ready'to-Wear Room, 

Tailor-Made Suits. Skirt s. 
Shirt Waists. Muslin Underskirts. 
Infant's Caps. Aprons, Neck- 
wear in the newest styles, etc. 



Shoe Department. 

If you will mention the name 
of Krippendorff-Wttman when 
you come in to (ret Ladies' 
Shoes, or Rice & Hutchintf's and 
Bradley, Metcalf when you want 
Men's Shoes, you will fit Shoes 
that not only Ht well but will 
wear well and at reasonable 
prices. Gymnasium Slippers, 
Danie Green's Felt Shoes. 



Hardware Department. 

We sell the celebrated "Keen 
Kutter" Goods, such as Razors. 
Pocket-knives. Shears. Scissors, 



Axes, etc Wilson Improved 
Air-ti(rht Heaters. Laundry 
Stoves with Baking Ovens. 
Builder's Hardware. Paints, Oil 
and Window Gloss. Stoves and 
Rantres. 



Grocery Room. 

A complete assortment o f 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
All Fruits and Vegetables in 
sea i »on. Murdock's Coffee. O. 
P. T. Extracts. 



Queens ware, Glassware, 
Lamps, etc. Fancy China, 
Japanese Ware. 



We deliver icoods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone HH for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Plume 87 for l>ry-Goods, I Ce tidy -to- wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 

"Courtn&fs Full- Vamp Shoes are Good 
Enough for Me." 



SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 



Kings 

Fountain Drinks 
Ice'Cream 



Homemade 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

r-—- MANUFACTURERS OF \ 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills! Disc Cultivators 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns' 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves Sash 
Weights, Chimney Caps, Structural Iron Work 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone a. 

Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEAtERIN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
• Cleaned and Repaired 

i2 ENGEL BROTHERS 




PUBLISHCO 

Each Thursday By 
Jhc Stvocnts Of The 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

Motto:IietEveiy One Cultivate His QuxaGzmtxs. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., November 16, 1905. 



Number 10 



November. 

Over the night's low clouds the flare 
Of burning marsh throws a ruddy glare; 
. Blue mists cling to the distant hill, 
The flowers are gone and the birds are still, 
Where dry grass bends 'neath the fox's tread 
The wierd witch-hazel her bower has spread. 
Across the dull grey sky the crows, 
Cawing, fly in wavering rows. 
Slowly and sadly the daylight dies, 
The wind is bleak; it sobs and cries. 

— Sara Andmv Shqfer. 



Don'ts. 

(From an English Football Annual.) 

FOR REFEREES. 

Don't blow your whistle so much. The spec- 
tators go to see football, not to hear music. 

Don't be officious. "The empty vessel makes 
the most sound." 

Don't imagine you are the only referee on the 
ground. Full many a referee blooms un- 
suspected round the ropes. We are all referees 
now, so why be bumptious. 

FOR PLAYERS. 

Don't take any notice of the spectators. 
They are prejudiced in your favor at home, and 
against you away, or else both ways, or neither. 
Spectators are a puzzle. 

Don't imagine you are incapable of deserv- 
ing a penalty kick against you. The chances 
are you deserve more than you get. 

Don't play a foul game. You wouldn't like 
to be laid up yourself on the eve of a big 
match. Then why lame the other chap. 



FOR SPECTATORS. 

Don't imagine that l>ecause you pay six pence 
you are entitled to own the football ground. 

Don't shout at the referee. It is usually a 
waste of breath. If the referee should notice it 
he will only harden his heart, or if he is a big 
man he may bum]) you out of the ground. 

Don't blame the referee for a defeat. He has 
probably given you many a victory. 



lonians. 

Society was called to order at the usual hour, 
by President Mattie Pittman. In the opening 
exercises Helen Inskeep led in devotion. 

Messrs. McCampbell and Grabendike opened 
the program with a mandolin-guitar duet. 
This was followed by a recitation by Minnie 
Conner. Helen Sweet then furnished society 
with a vocal solo. Both musical numbers were 
very much enjoyed. The recitation was also 
enjoyed and especially so because we realize 
that it is one of the most difficult assignments to 
duty one can receive. Next number was Hal- 
lowe'en Experiences, by Stella Campbell. 
Owing to lack of personal experience along 
this line, she gave a very interesting talk on 
Hallowe'en in other countries and the origina- 
tion of Hallowe'en games. Misses Lane and 
Thompson gave a piano- viol in duet as the 
next number. The Hamp.-Io. quartet sang for 
us. This was the first time we had been fa- 
vored by them, and to say the least we are 
proud of them. Professor McKeever was 
called upon. He gave a short talk in which he 
praised our work and stated, that if he was a 
student and couldn't be an lo. he would be a 
friend of one. He also praised our ''call," 
so of course we favored him with our yell. 
We wish he and other members of the Faculty 
would come more often. The next number of 



136 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



the program was an extra good edition of the 
"Oracle," by Edna Biddison, followed by a 
piano solo by Mary Kimball. Our society 
was fortunate in having with us Miss Dodge, 
who consented to give us a reading. This 
was one of the most pleasing numbers we have 
heard this year. We were then interested in 
hearing some of the amusing and otherwise, 
experiences of Ex-Io. Margaret Cole, as school- 
teacher in a German district. 

After a short business session, ' ( we adjourned 
to meet in closed session." 



Y. W. C. A. 

Meetings have been held each day this week 
in observance of the week of prayer. These 
have been in charge of the girls. The regular 
Saturday noon meeting, which will close the 
series, will be led by Miss Weeks. There is 
sure to be something good, and every girl 
should come. 

Franklin, < 

Under the head of program, Miss Alfrey 
introduced Mr. M. Otey/.a, who, accompanied 
by Miss Evans, entertained us with a violin 
solo. Mr. Larmor followed with a Wild West 
recitation. President Thurston produced some 
high-class music, by the Senior quartst. Then 
Professor Price gave us an interesting talk on 
society work. A debate, "Resolved, That 
chapel is a religious exercise," was argued 
affirmatively by E. L. McClaskey and nega- 
tively by M. M. Justin. After a good number 
of the "Spectator" by W. P. Schroeder, and 
Kappelman's essay, the "Irishman" criticised. 

K. I j. M* 

Alpha Beta. 

Society opened Saturday afternoon with a 
violin solo by Miss Lane, and May Gritting 
led in devotion. 

The program of the day was extra ordinem. 
Maude Harris presented a paper on Domestic 
Science, before and after taking, after which 
Miss Walter, in the roU of a D. S. instructor, 
called a class to give some practical demon- 
strations in. the culinary art. With a high and 
mighty air and a frequent poorly suppressed 
giggle, she called the roll and in language we 
hesitate to repeat gave directions for the work 
of the class. Judging from the sweets stolen 
behind the teacher's back, we should guess that 
the demonstration was a fair copy of a class in 
Kedzie Hall. While the concoction that the 
class mixed up, was stewing, Miss Allen showed 
some of the advantages of a D. S. home, but 
on account of sundry odors in the atmosphere 
it was not deservedly attended. The odors 
soon condensed into a more substantial article, 



the name of which we shall not undertake to 
spell, but to the palpability of which we can 
testify, as the cooks generously parsed it 
around. While it was being enjoyed the D, S. 
choral union sang a touching selection, which 
was followed by Miss Williston's "Gleaner." 

During the program the society was favored 
by vocal solos by Misses Church and Sweet, 
accompanied by Misses Hutchinson and Lill, 
for which we wish to express our appreciation. 

The business session was short, and we 
reached the head of adjournment peacefully. 

P. A. T. 

Cadet Officers at Fort Riley. 

Last Monday, Captain Shaffer took a party 
of cadet officers to Fort Riley to visit the fort 
and to watch the army maneuvers. The morn- 
ing was spent in following the troops across 
the country, and in watching an attack on a 
wagon train. The afternoon was spent in 
visiting the barracks and in watching the 
training of some young horses. Those who 
enjoyed the trip were: Heim, Evans, Wright, 
Ryan, Calvin, Lupfer, Lambert, and Clark. 



Cn Mt. Prospect. 

A jolly party of twenty- five, consisting of 
United Presbyterian young people and invited 
guests, spent Saturday evening very pleas- 
antly on Mt. Prospect. Every College class 
and nearly every society was represented, so 
no yell was slighted, each joining good- 
humored ly in all the yells. Lunch was served 
around a big camp-fire. The roasted apples, 
potatoes, and marshmallows were en joyed 
most, as "every man was a cook unto himself." 



The Engineers. 

The Engineering Association held its second 
regular meeting Saturday evening in Professor 
Eyer's class room. The program consisted of 
a discussion of gas engines, the mercury vapor 
transformer, and reinforced concrete. The last 
two are subjects in which all engineers should 
take a great interest. 

The transformer discussion was given by Mr. 
Stoddard, who very ably discussed his subject. 
The engineers will meet every Saturday even- 
ing in Professor Eyer's class room. 



fiamps. 

The program last Saturday evening con- 
sisted of music, the "Recorder" and its differ- 
ent departments. Like all the rest of the 
programs this term, it was exceedingly good. 
The program committee this term deserves 
much credit for their work. 

The first number was music by Miss Jones, 
introduced by A. D. Holloway. The different 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



137 



editors of the "Recorder" were as follows; 
C. G. Nevins, for news; T. Carlson, sporting* 
news; P. R. Lill, society; L. A. "Ramsey, 
editor-in-chief; Carl Kipp, advertising; G. D. 
Noel, household; J. H, Cheeney, market re- 
ports; R. R. White, cartoonist. All of the 
above papers were good and some were out of 
the ordinary. Music by the Harap. quartet, 
introduced by H. Bixby, was, as usual, good. 

E. L. A. 



Sophomore Beef Roast. 

Last Monday evening about fifty sophomores 
met at the south College gate, each carrying a 
pound of beefsteak, and marched in a body to 
Cedar Bend, on Wild Cat. After reaching 
there, several large bonfires were built and the 
business of the evening was begun. Each 
person secured a forked stick and proceeded to 
roast the steak to suit the individual tastes. 
After some time and labor this work was 
finished and together with various "trimming 1 ' 
the roasts were consumed. A few minutes 
were spent in joking and telling ghost stories, 
after which the fires were put out and the 
homeward march began. 

Webs. 

President Kiene pounded the desk and society 
came to order. After roll-call the following 
program was rendered: E. A. Wright gave a 
discussion and was followed by a short but 
interesting essay by H. D, Douglass. The 
question, "Resolved, That intercollegiate foot- 
ball promotes the best interests of colleges," 
was debated by "Banty" Williams and M. I. 
Stauffer. Of course, Stauffer, being the 
biggest, received first place. H. O. Munger's 
original story was next, followed by an oration 
by J. W. Blachley. A. H. Rose introduced 
Miss Jones, who favored us with music. M. 
D. Snodgrass read a good number of the 
"Reporter." After several extemporaneous 
speeches A. C. Ferris introduced the "Seven 
come eleven quartet," which gave some ex- 
cellent music. A short business session was 
followed by adjournment. J- J. W. 

Not the Same 

A young woman who has recently taken charge 
of a kindergarten, says The New York Sun, 
entered a trolley-car the other day, and as she 
took her seat smiled pleasantly at a gentleman 
sitting opposite. He raised his hat, but it was 
evident that he did not know her. 

Realizing her error, she said, in tones audible 
throughout the entire car: 

"Oh please excuse me! I mistook you for the 
father of two of my children!" 

She left the car at the next corner. 




Ro.se a clamor from the woodshed, 

Rushed a frantic mother there; 
Came a father forth explaining, 

I have merely fanned the heir.— Ex. 

Daily attendance of chapel is no longer com- 
pulsory at Princeton University. 

Chicago now has a course in railway con- 
struction. This is a new step and considered 
an important one. 

The sorority girls of Knox College have 
made an agreement that no freshman shall be 
pledged until one month after the beginning of 
the school year. 

The Washburn campus has been offered for a 
World's Fair site. The Fair is to be held in 
1911, and is to celebrate the fiftieth aniversary 
of the admission of Kansas into the Union. 
— Ex. 

The Ames football boys were accompanied to 
Nebraska University by the band, and two 
hundred rooters from their own college. This 
ought to be enough to encourage even a visit- 
ing team. 

Student enterprises are an essential part of 
school life. Any student will grant you that, 
but it is hard to convince every one that he 
must have a share in some, at least, of the 
undertakings.— ifo. 

In the annual freshman-sophomore rush of 
the University of Wisconsin over 600 students 
received duckings in Lake Mendota. This is 
said to be the worst affair of the kind in the 
history of that institution. 

At Trinity College the first-years have had to 
wear little blue skull caps with large white 
buttons on all occasions. It is necessary to 
obtain permission from a committee before any 
other style of head-gear may be worn. 

Last summer the supreme court of Massachu- 
setts decided that the Institute of Technology 
could not sell the land on which its buildings 
now stand. This decision blasted all hopes 
for the proposed merging of the Institute and 
Harvard. 
• A pedagogue told one of his scholars, a son 
of the Emerald Isle, to spell "hostility." 
"H-o-r-s-e— horse, " began Pat. "Not horse- 
tility," said the teacher, "but hostility." 
"Sure," replied Pat, "an' didn't ye tell me the 
other day not to say hoss? Be jabers, it's one 
thing wid ye one day an another the nixt." 



i» 



138 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LrrCvtAV 
One Cvitwati Hi j 
Own Gcniia ■•*-• 

'Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, ttve cents. 



F. A, Kiene. JR., '06 * Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hkim, '06 Business Manager 

E. C, Fahhah. '07 Literary Editor 

Q. C. Kahl. '07 Local Editor 

Mattib Pittman. '06 ..Exchange Editor 

Carrol Walker, '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

.1. S. Montgomery. *07 Subscription Manager 

L. E.GAHTON. '08 I A<s«*np Trfunil Editors 

Minnie Ihe. '07 f ' Assoc, uocai iwmors 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen, 08 Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be bung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late 1 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '(M, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Nov. lfi, 1905. 




plTQBlAEgfr/ 




£SH 




w\m 



The editor is pleased that, if he cannot draw 
contributions, he has at least called forth criti- 
cism. He considers it a good sign and hopes 
that it will continue. He further hopes that the 
critical people will not stop with mere criticism, 
but that they will allow the malady to develop 
until it reaches the stage where the sufferer will 
do something to relieve himself to the ultimate 
good of the Herald. We have been running 
twelve pages this terra, but will be glad to 
make it sixteen when copy worthy of printing 
can be found. We do not like to cover old 
ground, but we would like some substantial 
support from the students of the College in the 
matter of copy and subscriptions. The foot- 
ball season is nearly over, and then we will be 
forced to use other material. We consider 
football stories good reading, but have never 
denied space to other material on account of it. 
The literary editor will be glad to receive all 
contributions to place on* file for future use, so 
do not fail to write if you see something de- 
serving mention. 



— — 



The College songs can be had at the Herald 
office at five cents per copy. We are not look- 
ing for the nickels, but we would like to ses the 
song in the hands of all the students and to 
hear it sung by them. 



The football game which was to have been 
played yesterday is to be played to-morrow. On 
straight football our boys will win, and we ex- 
pect it of them. But the man that daros knock 
if they meet their first defeat to-morrow will re- 
ceive severest criticism Haskell's is an old 
and experienced team: ours is eomparitively 
new, so do not expect too much of it. 



Coach Ahearn and Captain Scholz had the 
{food fortune to see the game at Topeka last 
Saturday between K. U. and Washburn. 
They came home much elated, believing that 
our prospects for beating, or of holding K. U. 
to a very low score, are very good. Practice 
from now until then should ba most faithful. 
Every player should be in his suit and on the 
field promptly and ready for instruction. 
Every player should screw up his determina- 
tion to the highest point and play in the 
intervening days of practice to make himself 
perfectly fit for the contest. A prominent 
statistician has estimated that a victory over 
K. U. will be worth $50,0W) to the College. 
Coach Ahearn will also feel well repaid for his 
season's work, so let us work. 



A committee from the Rooters' Club is now 
working on an excursion to K. I T . to take place 
when our boys play the Jay hawkers. Nothing 
definite has been arranged, but every one is 
talking for a rate as low as one dollar for the 
round trip. At this rate at least three hundred 
should go to hack up our boys on the strange 
field. With our hand and an effectual crowd 
of rooters we should he able to surprise K. II. 
on two counts — the support given and the 
scores. An excursion will mean a day out of 
school, but we feel that it is worth while- both 
for the student and for our athletic efforts. 
Other schools run big excursions, and if the 
roads will favor us we will be well repaid by 
following suit, for most attention is called to 
the school when it does something out of the 
ordinary, We can not all go out of college 
with brilliant records, and the good impression 
made by some will be offset by a poor one 
made by another. This has occurred in the 
experience of all who have taken the time to 
notice it and think about it. A concent rated 
action which will receive notice in the papers 
will do much more than can an individual in 
his own small circle. And so we beiieve in 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



139 



making a noise, in doing things, and in getting 
the name of our Co liege in the paper. Let us 
make this excursion a success and then invite 
others hoth away from the school and to it. 



A Freshman's First Letter Home 

Strickland W. Gillilan. president of the Asso- 
ciation of American Humor' sts, contributes a 
clever short story to Success Mtujuzhie for Sep- 
tember, entitled ,4 A Fresno Freshman." The 
following letter from the freshman, written a 
few days after his arrival at college, is taken 
from H: 

"Dear Mom: I'd like to tell you everything's 
pleasant here, but I guess it's better for me to 
tell the truth -I'd feel better if I do. The 
cruel, hard life we've lived all these years, 
skimping on everything and crowding the en- 
tire income from cherry trees, vineyards and 
cows into my head, to the utter neglect of 
everything outside of it, has fitted me for col- 
lege in a way. My studies are easy. But, 
mother its downright crucifixion to be so glar- 
ingly unkempt and ungainly. I know just 
how I look. I'm different from other people. 
The things that seem to come natural to them, 
in a way of neatness and dressiness, look to 
me as if»I could not, in a whole lifetime culti- 
vate: and the clothes they seem to be used to 
seem out of reach for the best I have ever 
even hoped to own— at least until I am too old 
or too set in my ways to learn how to put them 
on and feel at home in them. Why did the 
fate that so persistently kept me from all these 
things refuse me the kindness of making me 
callous to the blows one's self-consciousness 
must suffer by reason of such shortcomings? 
But Fm going to stay, because you've worked 
like the mischief ever since we were left alone 
in the world, to give me the sort of education 
you hungered for in your girlhood. I'm going 
to see if brains will count against clothes. I'm 
sorry I'm not there to take all the heavy work 
off your hands. My muscles fairly ache to 
be doing something difficult. Don't let Pedro 
shirk on you. If he does, I'll break every bone 
in his body when I come home. Jf I could Qply 
have left my strength at home for you! I seem 
not to need it here. Maybe I'll get used to this 
sort of life, and maybe I won't. Lovingly, Ez. " 



Don't 



| Scold. Live, 

) Boast. Love, 

Parade. Rnt Laugh, 

Belliake. aui and do 

Things 
t Worth while. 

—Ellxrt llubhard. 



*£ Knockers' Corner 






How queer that some people so soon forget 
their own college days and become so engrossed 
in the serious side of life that any attempt at 
deviation from the strenuous routine of college 
duties at once strikes them as either a mockery 
of the insane or a grand display of ignorance. 

The writer has reference to a certain little 
speech made in chapel one morning of lust 
week. These remarks were entirely uncalled 
for.' Is the slightest attempt at class spirit such 
a condemnahle feature as all that? 

We venture to say that not a single junior 
entered chapel on Saturday morning with less 
feeling of reverence than on any previous 
morning, and the harmless display of hosiery 
and "pedal extremities" certainly should not 
have given occasion for such statements. 

Imagine a world without enthusiasm: think 
of a log drifting down stream and you have a 
pretty good idea of a school without class or 
college spirit. 

We believe in loyal ity. We believe in en- 
thusiasm for our work as well as for our play. 
But we do not believe in trying to smother. any 
and all attempts of college spirit as long as 
these are within rational bounds. A JUNIOR. 



Married people are like shoes— if exactly alike 
they are misfits. 



Girls Rooters' Club. 

Observing the good work already being done 
for a good cause, and desiring not to be be- 
hind the times, we, the girls of the Rooters' 
Club, have organized for the purpose of doing 
our part in making athletics what it should be, 
in giving the team what support we can. and 
to help in entertaining the visiting teams. 

At the first meeting Stella Campbell was 
elected president and the club was organized. 
At the second meeting the following officers 
were elected: Laura Lyman, yell leader: Neva 
Larson, treasurer: and Margaret Cunningham, 
secretary. Several songs were proposed, and 
the two following were chosen to use at Fair- 
mount game. 

Tcnk, "Tale Of A Kangaroo." 

OU, Fan-mount she is jolly. 
Oh. Fairmount she is tray. 
But when I he truine is over 
She'll feel the other way. 
She'll see the constellations. 
The moon, the stars, the sun. 
And shell feel soil of sickly 
When the foot hull frame is done. 

TUNE. "Good Old Summer Time." 

In the good old football time. 

With Seholz's stonewall line. 
Rushing over Rluemount Held 
Toward the Fairmount line. 
Walker. Nystrom. Wilbur. Kirk. 
Oh ain't they simply line. 
And there'll he something doing 
When they reach the Fairmount line. 



140 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 





d©ss$^ 




Mr. H. O. Monger 1ms a Boston hair cut. 

Captain Shaffer went to Topeka Saturday. 

The sophomores are "ragging'* over class 
colors. 

Joe Montgomery wears '(Mi on part of his 
hosiery. 

Tom Bower and Miss Evans drove to Ft. 
Riley Sunday. 

F. A. Mayer, freshman, went home Saturday, 
returning Monday. 

Geo. Knostman. a former student, was vis 
iting College last week. 

Geo. C. Miller, junior in '04, is teaching 
school in Willard, Kan. 

Harry Omen spent several days last week at 
his home near Randolph. 

As st. Prof. O. H. Hal stead received a visit 
from his mother last week. 

Miss Anna Hostrup, sophomore in '04, was 
a College visitor last Friday. 

Miss Mary Gaden, sophomore last year, was 
visiting friends over Sunday. 

Ex-regent William Hunter, of Blue Rapids, 
visited Janitor Lewis last week. 

The Chapman high school football team vis- 
ited College Monday forenoon. 

Miss Laura Nor r is, freshman, enjoyed a 
visit from her father last week. 

M. I. Stauffer has a very strenuous way of 
"grafting" for the Jayhawker. 

Lloyd Ferguson is staying at the home of 
Miss Parkerson, on College Hill. 

The juniors are discussing the relative 
merits of class pins and class rings. 

Superintendent Rickman's mother, of Newton, 
Iowa, is. visiting her son this winter. 

The freshmen had a class party Monday 
evening. A good time was reported. 

Frank Johnson, sophomore, has dropped 
out of College on account of sickness. 

Miss McNutt and Miss Esdon, both of the 
'06 class, are assisting in the library. 

It is rumored that the seniors "knocked the 
socks" off of a prominent junior last week. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fohs, and Lockets at 

Askren'sV 

Pres. E. R. Nichols went to Washington, D. 
Cy Saturday. He will be back the later part 
of this week. 



Mr. Rosencrans, a student of the State 
Normal, visited Miss Viola Secrest over 
Sunday. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fohs, and Lockets at 
Askren's ? 

Assistant Eastman returned Saturday, after 
an absence of two weeks. He has been away 
on institute work. 

A. H. Rose, sophomore, had the misfortune 
to get his wrist broken last Saturday while 
playing football. 

In his sermon Sunday evening, Reverend 
Hanson said: "It is no credit to the Faculty 
to *cut chapel.'" 

The senior class were out seranading the 
Faculty Friday night. The members bought 
candy at the Bazaar. 

E. A. Wright, an '00 engineer, is teaching 
Algebra I to the subfreshmen. Earnest takes a 
great delight in his work. 

The sophomores were unable to have a full 
report of the committee on colors last Tuesday. 
Reason, a junior had the samples. 

Brigadier-General Hughes and equipment 
went home on a furlough Friday. The entire 
command ma relied to the depot. 

Felton brothers, '04, attended the wheat 
lecture at Galva last Wednesday and gave 
each of the " spielers" the glad hand. 

Professor Hamilton, Coach Ahearn and 
Captain Scholz went to Topeka Saturday to 
see the K. U. -Washburn football game. 

Miss Waters, who has been assisting in the 
Preparatory Department, has resigned. May 
Harris has taken charge of her classes. 

"Judge" Hazen, senior, received a gold 
watch and chain from bis parents last week, in 
remembrance of his twenty-first birthday. 

A great many have been visiting the 
Domestic Science Department the past week, 
and seem to be much interested in the work. 

Mrs. R. R. Price has been visiting relatives 
in McPherson county for the last week. She 
attended the lecture oh the wheat special at 
Canton Friday. 

Mrs. E. S. Clarke, of Wagoner, I. T., is 
visiting her son, L. S. Clarke (junior), and 
other relatives near Manhattan, She expects 
to be here a month. 

Some evil-minded human scape-goat has 
been pulling up the new foot scrapers at the 
dairy barn recently. Melick says if he wants 
them to come around and ask for them. 

While out driving last week, Miss Ida 
Rigney had the misfortune to have her horse 
run away, causing a very serious accident. 
Her right leg was broken below the knee. 

The seniors held chapel exercises in the old 
chapel last Saturday. Rev. Hannum, of the 
United Presbyterian church, conducted the 
meeting. Miss Laura Lyman sang, "Just For 
To-day." All the seniors were much pleased 
with the meeting, declaring it good to have 
met in such close fellowship. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



141 



College song's are on sale at the Herald 
office at five cents per copy. 

Prof. R. H. Shaw want t:> Lincoln, Neb.. 
Saturday, November 4, and returned on the 
0th. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs, and Lockets at 
Askren's? 

Assistants Holroyd and Zeininger have their 
offices decorated with the football posters of 
this season. 

Prof. L. B. Burt, of the Alma high school, 
was visiting about College Thursday afternoon 
of last week with his friend, C. W. McCamp- 
bell. 

The Choral Union meets once a week at the 
noon hour. Every effort to make the annual 
music festival in March a grand success is 
being put forth. 

The game that was to have been played yes 
terday is postponed until to-morrow. Every 
one is expected to be present. The team will 
need your support. 

There was a game of football last Saturday 
between the Cole-Graham cluhs and Garver's 
Invincibles. The score was 11 to 6 in favor 
of the former. Several "slats" were broken. 

Asst. V. M. Shoesmith came home Monday 
to meet his corn-judging class. He made 
connections with the corn and wheat special at 
3:30 on the same day, and will he gone until 
Saturday evening. 

Last Saturday the junior boys came out in 
their class colors. All took seats in the 
gallery during chapel exercises. They wore 
red and white hose and rolled their trousers 
up to their knees. 

The Thurston Bro's have decorated the win- 
dow at E. L. Knostman's store with the College 
colors, and pennants of numerous colleges and 
universities. It will be used as a place to give 
the results of football games. A large poster 
will be shown of each College game, until after 
the Thanksgiving game. 

The Alpha Beta Alumni Association met 
Tuesday evening at the home of Kate Manly, 
'99. After the installation of the newly elected 
officers. F. A. Marlatt, '87, gave an address, 
Amv Allen, '04, recited an original poem, W. 
W. Hutto, '»1, and wife furnished music, Emma 
( Knostman) Huse, '80, gave a talk on Russia. 
After the program refreshments were served 
and a social time enjoyed. 

The football game Monday between the Col- 
lege second team and the Chapman high-school 
team resulted in a score of 17 to in favor of 
the College. The game was a rather poor ex- 
hibition of football, in which the light high- 
school players were outclassed and outplayed. 
The visitors were plucky fellows, but they were 
not in condition to play against a heavy team. 
Two of their players were injured in first half, 
and it was necessary to finish the game with 
ten men on a side. In team work the visitors 
had the advantage. For the College, Captain 
Oskin, Christian and Johnson played the best 
game. Irwin and Moore did good work for 
Chapman. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Anna Monroe, '04, came in Sunday to attend 
the Griffing-Harlan wedding. 

Helen Kernohan, '04. paid a business visit to 
the College the first of the week. 

Miss Elva Akin, '05, left for Emporia Sat- 
urday, where she will attend the State Normal. 

Miss Grace Enlow, a former student, of Wa- 
mego, Kan., is visiting College friends this 
week. 

C. P. Blachly, '05, of Topeka, visited at 
home last week, owing to the serious illness of 
his mother. 

Miss Margaret Cole, '05, was visiting home 
folks over Sunday. She is at present teaching 
school in Clay county. 

The friends of Mamie Cunningham, '05, will 
be glad to learn that she is rapidly recovering 
from her recent illness. 

W. H. Harlold, '05, left last week for Law- 
rence, where he is working with J. T. Skinner. 
'04. for the Lawrence Electric Company. 

Elizabeth Pritner Lock wood is a new mem lie r 
of the family in the home of Mary (Pritner) 
Lockwood, '99, and Prof. Frank C. Lockwood. 

Mr. Harry V. Harlan and Miss Gussie 
Grifflng, both of the class of '04, were married 
at the home of the bride's parents, on College 
Hill, Wednesday, November 15, 1905. They 
will soon leave for the Philippines, where Mr. 
Harlan has a position in the employ of the 
Government. 

R. A. Carle and R. A. Fulton, '05, are with 
the Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing 
Company of Pittsburg, and send their address 
as Turtle Creek. Pa. ■ Mr. Carle is working on 
a high tension test and is at present designing 
apparatus for applying new insulating ma- 
terial. Mr. Fulton is working in the rheostat 
department. They are both members of the 
"Electric Club," an organization for the 
improvement of college men in technical 
subjects. A part of the work of the club is to 
visit the different electric plants of importance 
in the vicinity of Pittsburg. They report their 
visit to the famous "Homestead Steel Com- 
pany'' as the most interesting. 

Nora Hays visited College Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Haskell us. K. S. A. C. Friday afternoon at 
Athletic Park. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs, and Lockets at 
Askren's? 

It is an old saying, "Jack of all trades and 
master of none." One cannot afford to divide 
his ability until it counts for nothing in any 
phase of life. Let him be master of one trade 
and make his influence felt upon it. Let him 
establish an ideal suited to his nature and 
ability and strive to reach and elevate it to a 
portion higher than it has been before.— Ax. 



\-\-2 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



u 



t 
t 

i 

i 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

■ - — - . - ■■ — — — *— ^^ — ' - — , . 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



Shoes repaired 
while you wait 






C%.' 



K. S. A. C. Directory. 



HAMILTON SOCIETY 

President R. A, COSSeU 

Vice-President C. I. Weaver 

Secretary A. D. Hollowav 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in North Soci- 
ety Hall. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY 

President : F. A. Kiene. Jr 

Vice-president H. R. Helm 

Secretary O. C. Kahl 

Meets Saturday evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in South Soci- 
ety Hull. 

ALPHA BETA SOCIETY 

President May Harris 

V ice-president Ray Birch 

Secretary J. R. Garver 

Meets in South Society Hall, Saturday. 2:30 p. M. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY 

President VV. B. Thurston 

Vice-president E. L. Shattuck 

Secretary Tillie Trunk 

Meets in Franklin Hall. Saturday, at 7:30 p. M. 

BTJROD ! LPH IAN SOCIETY 

President Winifred Dalton 

Vice-president Boline Hanson 

Secretary Louise Fleming 

Meets every Saturday in Franklin Hall, at 3:45 p. M. 

IONIAN SOCIETY 

President Mattie Pittman 

Vice-president Laura Lyman 

Secretary... Minnie Ise 

Meets in North Society Hall. Saturday, at 2M5 p. M. 

Y. W. C. A. 

President Cora E. McNutt 

Vice-president Helen Inskeep 

Secretary Ethel Berry 

General Secretary Miss Thayer 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
South Society Halt. The Home. 617 Manhattan Ave. 

Y. M. C. A, 

President E. C, Farrar 

Vice-president W. B. Thurston 

Secretary E. L. Shattuck 

General Secretary W. W. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 
3:30. 

ROOTERS' CLUB 

Chairman F. A. Kiene, Jr 

Vice-chairman A. D. Hollow ay 

Secre tury J. R, Coxen 

Treasurer Fred Lindsey 

Meets at the call of the ehairuian. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President. H. R. Heira 

Vice-president C. I. Weaver 

Secretary ; M. I. Stauffer 

General Manager Prof. J. O. Hamilton 

Meets at call of the president. 

ENGINEERS* ASSOCIATION. 

President Harvey Hubbard 

Vice-President Torje Carlson 

Secretary . . . .. Mr. Graham 

Meets Monday evenings in C'tto. 



Too Many for Him. 

At the conclusion of the regular lessons at 
a certain Sunday-school the superintendent 
made a short address to the assembled classes. 
At the end of his remarks he said: 

"Now all you boys and girls that would like 
to go to heaven when you die hold up your 
hands." 

Instantly every child had a hand in the air ex- 
cept one little fellow sitting in the far corner, 
who. in answer to the superintendent's question, 
"Don't you want to go to heaven?" replied: 
"No, siree. not if that crowd's a-goin'." 



He Wanted to Know. 

A bishop in full robes of office, with his gown 
reaching to his feet, was teaching a Sunday- 
school class. At the close he said he would he 
glad to answer any questions, 

A little hand went up, and he asked: "Well, 
my boy?' 1 * 

•Tan I ask?" said the boy. 

"Certianly," said the Bishop; "what is it?" 

"Well," asked the boy, "is dem all you've 
got on, or do you wear pants under dem?" 



PHOFKSSIOXA L. 



DU. G. A. CLUSK, DKNTIST. 



St years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest .skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. McKKE, DIvNTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building. 327Poyntz. 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Office 66: Res, 63. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOK, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 tn Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 R es . rhone, Cave HO 

Drs. Colt & Cavo. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bidg.. Downstairs. 



Offlce Phone 307 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



14a 



17 



»*■■»< 



Tl 






"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

, . Candies . . 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



ftj 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of- 




Ice C 



ream 



Oyfters 



w 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



I 






i . * Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

r ountaini ice cream sodas - — 



U 



J 



r 



Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in and see our eight-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains. Prices, $ 1 .00 and upward. 



1 



Co-operative 



L 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention. 

Chas. S. Jones, - - Manage 



r Bookstore 



J 



The College Grocer y and Meat Market. 

Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Canned Meats, 

Fruits and Candies 



1116 MoroSt. 
Phone 227 



We deliver 
goods promptly 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



144 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 



//. H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



l. \ 



AMOS 




HIGH 

CLAS S 
PHOTOS 



227 Poyntz A venue 







Special Rates to Students, 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE 8r BELL. Props. 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEAT5 and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent, 

411 Poynt/ Av?nu?. Phone 74 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year. 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan, 

Over Union National Bank. 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I, & P, Ry. 

Geo* T* Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113*15 N. Second St, 



5 



SHOES 




CLOTHES THAT SUIT 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS 1 FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 



Roberts & Ottowa clothiers 



i 




150,000 Dairy Farmers are Going to be Added to the Big Army of More 

Than Six-hundred Thousand Users of 

DC LclVcil ^ r — m Separators 



During the Year 1905 



The all-important profit-earning, time-saving need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval is the original, and has for twenty-five years 
led in centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- 
ize the construction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modern improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars are to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval Separator Company 



Randolph Mid Canal Sts., Chicago 



New York 



_w-W' __ w; 



^^w i ■ \*z^? ' w .w; 



ssatts 



. . , W- ^ _ 



I THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

= JOHN PURCELLs = 




Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 



327 POYNTZ AVE. 

Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly % 
to Any Part of the City .... % 




College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections... 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 

t O O OOOOO O OOOOO O OOP O COO O OQO OO O Ol 



^SS.^^S.SS>^.tR.^^v^nS.S^-S-S.S^RS-S.^^.S.S^S.SS3S.' 



W. S. ELLIOT 



% 

X 



* 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students, X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suite and Overcoats. A; 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suite. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. X X X 




i 

i 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



s 

i 

2 
* 

* 
* 
* 



******»**»**»»»»»»»» 



We have been busy changing our store so as to handle our Big Holi- 
day Trade more conveniently, and repainting and papering 
so as to display to the best advantage the 

Best Lot of Holiday Goods 



Jilt B HHVE VBT HKO- 




* 

1 

* 

* 



i**S**StfWa«Wt3t?«t5«Wt^^ 



We have received a Large Line of Fancy Work, both finished articles and 

goods to be made up, and 

Now is the Time to Get these Goods 

while there is plenty of time to make them up. We also have displayed a 
Large Factory Line of Fancy Box Papers and Cloth Weave Paper and Envel- 
opes In bulk* which we are selling' at popular prices. 



THE BIG RACKET 



1W 



u 




i 






*m 












Keuffel & Esser Co. 

«* OF* NBJitf YORK * 

813 Locust Street, - Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon'' 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPER8 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraxon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS ( c <iSfe). 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



J 






iWJ/.M5-{;-*i !V,!^;k;;; iUMUl 



.:: i^Mt-:UMS*M;','." ;■■.:;•■. ,-■ ;:-•-.. 






New 

Jewelry 

flTFINE, SOLID-GOLD AND 
^| GOLD-FILLED JEWELRY 
Our store is filling up every week with 
new and sparkling Jewelry. Fine silk 
Umbrellas for Ladies and Gentlemen. 
Solid-silver Souvenir Spoons. When 
you buy anything in this store you do not 
have to select from a lot of old shop- 
worn goods. This is the up-to-date 
Jewelry Store where you find the new 
stock. 



ASKREN, 



The Jeweler 

and 

Optician 



Bilger's Hack 

AND 

Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night Will cafl any 
place in town for passen- 
gers, **L -**L 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



L 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



145 



Wolfs Cottage Studio 



-<e- 



~. 3 5 1- 




Opposite Carnegie Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

F, B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



211) Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. .Largest system 
■ - of teWgraph ' schools in America. * En- 
dorsed, by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, 0., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 58. 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer you only the best* X X 

W. M, STINGLEY & CO 



146 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




mutest 



DEALE 



DryGoods Room. 

Dress Goods in all varieties. 
Mohairs are much In evidence 
this season. Tennis Flannel. 
Shaker Flannel. Percales. Ging- 
hams. Cheviots, Cotton or Wool 
Blankets. Hosiery, Underwear, 
etc, 



Rcady/tcvWear Room, 

Tailor-Made Suits, Skirts, 
Shirt Waists. Muslin Underskirts. 
Infant's Caps, Aprons, Neck- 
wear in the newest styles, etc. 



Shoe Department, 

If you will mention the name 
of Krippendorff-Dittman when 
you come in to get Ladies' 
Shoes, or Rice & Hutching's and 
Bradley, Metcalf when you want 
Men's Shoes, you will get Shoes 
that not only fit well but will 
wear well and at reasonable 
prices. Gymnasium Slippers, 
Danie Green's Felt Shoes. 



Hardware Department 

We sell the celebrated "Keen 
Kutter" Goods, such as Razors, 
Pocket-knives, Shears, Scissors, 



Axes, etc- Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters, Laundry 
Stoves with Baking Ovens. 
Builder's Hardware, Paints, Oil 
and Window Glass, Stoves and 
Ranges. 



Grocery Room, 

A complete assortment o f 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
All Fruits and Vegetables in 
season. Murdock's Coffee. O. 
P. T. Extracts. 



Queens ware, Glassware, 
Lamps, etc. Fancy China, 
Japanese Ware, 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry- Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 



U 



Courtney's Fttll-Vamp Shoe* are Gwd 
Enough for Me. " 



SOLD ONLY BY- 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 




Do Not 
Wait 



Rain Coats— Some new ones Just In, 
$10 to $20. 



E. L. Knostman. 






For a day with zero 
weather to buy your 
heavy suit and overcoat. 
Follow the wise one and 
make your selection now 
at the store where the 
best selections are to be 
had. 



Young men's suits 

nobby patterns. 

$10 to $20 



Young men's swell 

overcoats, 72 to 

75-inch sweep, 

$8.50 to $25 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jus 5'ti/ocnts Of Tml 
Kansas 5tatc Agricultural College 

NfQttalietEvejyOne CultivaseHis Ouxv Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., November 2-'v 190& 



Number It 



Football Days. - 

The foot hull days have come a^ain, 

The idaddest of the year. 

One side of Willie's nose is tfone 

And Tom has Inst an ear. 

Heaped on the Held the players jab 

And punch and el aw 'and tear. 

They knock the breath from those beneath 

And jah without a eare,. 

They break each oi hers arms and lens 

And pull joints oat of pi nee. 

And here and there is one who- wets 

His teeth kicked from his face. 

The freshman and the sophomore. 

Besmeared with srrime and nlndh' 

(Jo gallantly to yet the. hall. 

And qtttt all bathed in blood. 

The senior knocks the junior dinvn 

And kicks him in the chest. 

The hitrh-sehool boy is'earried home 

And jrently. laid to rest. 

Here and there a crowded stand 

Collapses nea-th its weight. ■ 

And forty people tret more (ban 

They paid for at the &rate. 

Oh brave, oh happy, careless days. ■ 

How deep the mother's joy: 

What times she thinks of all the things 

They're dolnjr to her boy. 

.What pride to think that he 

Is on the team. How sweet' 

His face appears to bev since . , 

It is only bloody meat. 

With honest, prtde she lays away ■ 

His amputated ear. 

And puts the eye in alcohol 

To be a souvenir. 



IttnUitt (troth. 



K. S, A. C. 60, Haskell 0. 
Kleveri little Indians left ' their reservation 
near Lawrence last Friday and came up Bete 
to play font lull I. They returned the next day. 
but they left their scalps. The game was good 
practice for Ahearn's hoys, and it was rather 
interesting for the spectators. To say that it 
was a walk-away for otir boys would lie ex- 
pressing it rather mildly. One enthusiast said 
that it was a runaway, and that statement 
just about fits the case. The Indians, who 
were first team substitutes atid second team 
men, wore outweighed about twelve pounds to 
the man. In team work no comparison of the 
two teams can be made. Only twice in the 
entire game did the Indians have the ball in 



( ollege'territory. Inthelirst half they gained 
forty-five yards, while the College gained three 
hundred thirty-rive. In the second half the 
Indians made live yards while no record was 
ke pt of tl ie gains by the Coll ege . On 1 y once 
was the Colic lie held for downs, and not once 
were they forced to punt. 

Captain J-'ch dz was unable to play because 
of a sprained sir. udder, so Kirk played at full 







Million's hurdle. 



in the first half. He went to quarter in the 
•second half, while Wilber played full, IJrown 
went in at Ost hind's guard in the second half, 
and" Harris took I {lake's end. Lindsey played 
his first frame at J eft end and did good work. 
Kvery player, both old and- new, did first-class 
work. For Haskell. Cood Kayle at left end, 
Hill at 'quarter and Lubadie at full, played 
good games. 

The game showed that our team is getting in 
better shape all the time. Our back field is fast 
and the nvm play together well, while the line 
i-s more aggressive than ever before. 

Of the ten touch-downs, seven were made by 
Nv strom, two by Ma lion, and, one by Kirk. 
Nystronv kicked every goal. Perhaps the finest 
play of thv game was Million's long ran of 
eighty-four yards for a touch-down. He had 
• good- interference part of the way, but ran 
about thirty yards alone. He dodged two men 



148 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



and hurdled one, while a fourth one was left 
behind in the race. Later in the game he ran 
thirty yards for another touch-down. Nystrom 
made one run of forty yards, as well as a num- 
ber of shorter runs. Cunningham made a 
nice return of more than thirty yards on a 
punt. 

The score at the end of the first half was 42 
to 0. The time of the second half was reduced 




Nystrom couldn't be stopped. 

to fifteen minutes, but when the score reached 
60, Mallon gave them a chance to quit and they 
did so. Had the game lasted the agresd time 
the score would probably have reached 100. 
The line T up of the two teams was : 
Haskbu* K. S. A. C. 

Barril C Whipple 

Rowland B.Q Ostlund. Brown 

Reynolds L.Q Hangman 

Irving R. T Cooley 

Roubidouir L. T . . , Montgomery 

GilHnwater R.E Blake, Harris 

Good Eagle .. v L. E Llndsey 

Hill Q Cunningham. Kirk 

Walker, Black Boy R. H Nystrom 

Pappan i>. H..... Mallon 

Labadie. Poorthunder P Kirk. WUber 

Officials: Booth and Coach Hill. 



Ionian. 

Pres. Mattie Pittman called the society to 
order Saturday and presided during the first 
part of the session, after which the vice-presi- 
dent, Laura Lyman, wielded the gavel. The 
Ionian* showed their College spirit by enthu- 
siastically singing the College song, with Ger- 
trude Lill at the piano, and were then led in 
devotion by Ruth Neiman. The girls responded 
to roll-call with quotations from Shakespeare. 

Our first number was rendered by the Queer 
Quartette. Flora Hull, in a newsy paper, in- 
formed us of the important happenings in 
foreign, domestic and College circles. Grace 
Streeter introduced Irene Ingraham to the so- 
ciety, who gave a very enjoyable piano solo. 
The next number was something out of the 
ordinary and was certainly a treat to all. 
Mrs. Ridenour played softly while little Eleanor 
hushed her dolly to sleep. "Dolly" slept 
quietly through the applause which the little 
maiden received. Mary Kimball then gave us 
an excellent recitation, which was followed by 



a vocal solo from one of our new members, 
Erma Church, The president of the Franklin 
Society, Mr. W. B. Thurston, was present and 
was called upon for a few remarks. Then 
came another "Soco volo" by Allan Cooper, 
who sang in her usual pleasing style. The 
"Oracle,** edited by Laura Lyman, contained 
many interesting, laughable, and well-written 
articles. We were glad to hear again a vocal 
solo by Lena Finley, an ex-Io. Miss Anna 
Fitz was introduced to the society and rendered 
a pleasing vocal selection. 

The business session was short, and after 
listening to the critic's report and a few re- 
marks under "general criticism," the society 
adjourned. s. h. 

Websters, 

Vice-president Ferris called the society to 
order, after which the following program was 
given. 

Music by J. L. Smith was furnished by the 
"Smith Trio," accompanied by Miss Smith. 
J. A. Lupfer introduced Miss Dodge, who gave 
a reading accompanied by Miss Hill ia rd. 
This was a very good number. Smith Ferris 
gave a discussion. Sol. Cunningham pre- 
sented music furnished by Mr. Milligan, ac- 
companied by Miss Carnahan. G. P. Potter 
gave a recitation, after which F. W. Winter 
read a good original story. This was followed 
by a miscellaneous number by A. E. Im- 
menschuh, assisted by C. T. Gibbon, who gave 
a very jolly number. An extemporaneous 
speech by W. M. Putman was followed by the 
"Reporter," by F. A. Kiene. This was the 
best "Reporter" read before the society for a 
long time. After "Capt." Walker had criti- 
cised, F. L. Englehbart, R. Shuyier, O. S. R. 
Mings and Charles Cains, agreeing to support 
the constitution, became Websters. An inter- 
esting business session followed, and then ad- 
journment. "Banty." 

Hamlltons. 

The program was opened by a discussion 
on "The Republican Party," by Mr. Alspach. 
H. R. Hillman gave a talk on the "Tammany 
Tiger." R. A. Cassell introduced the Smith 
trio, which furnished some excellent music. 
An essay on. "International Arbitration" was 
given by C. L. Hawkinson. Elmer Johnson 
told us, "What is north of the North Pole." 
R. Green read a paper on parliamentary law, 
after which he conducted a parliamentary 
quiz. This was a very instructive number, 
and is something we should have more often 
on our programs. The music by the "Jug 
Band" was good of its kind, and was much 
enjoyed. 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



149 



Eurodelphian Society. 

Society was called to order by President 
Dalton. After roll-call Miss Cooper amused 
us with an original story. Rev a Cree then 
gave a review of "Things doing in America." 
Winifred Dalton, in her •'winning" way, 
amused us by giving "Private opinions pub- 
licly expressed." The society paper, the 
"Delphi," was read by the editor, Grace Smith. 
This paper is the pride of the Euro's and will 
be edited more frequently hereafter. The music 
furnished during the program was given by 
Miss Biddison and the Queer quartet. After a 
lively business session society adjourned. 

T. H. 



Sin it a sour of football 
Don't it make you smile ? 
Two and twenty players 
StrufwHnjr in a pile : 
When the pile is opened 
Hear those awful if roans. 
Boys bejrin to creep out. 
Looking for their hones. 
Sections there of noses. 
Patches here of hair, 
But Vystrom made a touch-down 
And little do they care. 

— Selected. 



A. Bs, 

The game in the A. B. hall was called at 
2:00 P. M. Saturday with a considerable show 
of enthusiasm on all sides. ' W. W. Strite, who 
should have played center, acted half-back 
instead, entering near the end of the first half, 
and "Son John," who usually plays half, was 
full-back, not getting into the game at all. 

After the kick-off by Miss Esdon, the ques- 
tion of electing members by the black-ball 
system was brought up and sharply contested, 
and Miss Lane, by a center rush, would have 
scored had it not been for the interference of 
the remainder of the society. "Gatey" tried 
to carry an amendment by an end run, but the 
play was blocked; she passed the amendment 
to Phillips, who tried to hurdle the line but was 
tackled by Gaston. The latter, however, was 
penalized for dirty playing. May said it 
wasn't fair and Miss McKeeman murmured 
"them's my sentiments, tew." 

The features of the game were Smith's kicks, 
Gaston's fumbles, and Ireland's frequently pro- 
posed amendments to the rules. 

During the progress of the game a peculiar 
long-maned biped was observed among the 
spectators. He aroused some suspicion but 
proved to be nothing but a Hamp. 

Miss Grifflng tried to buck the line with a re- 
port of the board, but fumbled and the play 
was stopped by one of Smith's characteristic 
kicks. During the pause Mrs. Ridenour and 
Misses Biddison and Jones entertained the 
society with music, and the fun recommenced. 



Miss Tolin made a toneh'-back for the* pur- 
pose of initiating members,- Miss Cassel and 
W. J. Broom being put in play inconsequence. 

Then Skinner advanced with the "Gleaner," 
and time for the first half was up. 

In the second half Birch led off with a feint 
at wit, but failed to make a gain and White, 
after numerous similar attempts, finally scored. 
Smith failed to kick goal. 



Corn and Wheat Train at Clay Center. 

At 12:50 p. M., Monday, November 13, the 
corn and wheat train arrived at Clay Center, 
where a large crowd of farmers were waiting to 
hear the addresses. Professors Willard and 
TenEyck talked the entire limit of time al- 
lowed them, and it was only with serious regrets 
that the audiences left the cars when time was 
called for the train to depart. Professor Will- 
ard spoke on wheat and Professor TenEyck on 
corn, and, from what we heard after the train 
had gone, it appeared that many new ideas had 
been formed and many resolutions for better 
work and careful seed breeding made. Groups 
of men talked of this new idea for hours on the 
streets. 

It seemed an inspiration to me to grasp 
hands with these College professors with whom 
so many pleasant hours have been spent. 

Extending best wishes to the Herald (a wel- 
come, weekly visitor) and all my College 
friends, I remain, Respectfully, 

W. F. Kerr, 

Bible Study Reception. 

A reception was held in the D. S. Hall last 
Monday evening by the young mens' Bible- 
study classes. 

After getting acquainted with the premises, 
a short program was rendered. Colwell's 
Filipino boys began the "stunts" with a song 
in their native tongue. Whipple's class then 
exhibited a high-class clog dance. Farrar's 
class tried to imitate our recent victory over 
the Indians, and the only thing lacking was 
the number of touch-downs. The exposition 
by Ferris on a doughnut ended disastrously 
for the subject-matter, for he ate it. Garver 
then announced that a male-female prize fight 
would take place. No bones were broken in 
the contest. Praeger and Smith's corn-stalk 
fiddlers was one of the best numbers— cer- 
tainly the most original. Several other 
"stunts" were given, after which coffee and 
doughnuts were served in the kitchen. No one 
regretted the time spent, and all felt that they 
had been brought a little closer together during 
the evening's amusements. L. M. J. 

K. S. A. C. vs. K. U., at Lawrence, Saturday. 



150 

- ■Ml ■ 



the. students; heralp. 



^* 




Motto: LctCvcbt 
One CuLT<v*Tt Hi I 
Own Genua •+■ 

rin'tfnjr Depart- 
ntudent labor. :*,, 

■*-■ — — , : 



Entered at the post-offlce'at "Manhattan.' Kuh.. as .second- 
class matter. 



, J 1 - "J ^ — "—- — ' — \ — yy— ~ 7~~~* — ~ ~ \ - ' ' \\ t ' i — Y"* 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, 
1 ■ • Hmjrle copies, rive cents. 



in advance. 






: . 



i , • . , ■ . 

F. A. KlBNK. JH..'0tt 

H.R.HMM.'tM... ■.{....-.: 
E. C. FA It HA K. '07 

&, c. kahl. \n:.:. ........ 

Mattj k Pittm a n . "I KS . .;. . . , 
Cahhol Wai-kkk. or — 

J.' S. MiiN'ltiOMKRV. '07... 
L,ft,GAffroW.'Q8| 

WtKxtwUm.'*® f 

■ ELI/.AHKTH SWKKT. "0.4,..,. 

J. R. Coxkn. "OH ..'. ., ..'..Reporter 

1 AU orders for subscript ions and I n< t ui ries ■concern in tf 
. advertising space should be addressed to the business 
manairers. 

To insure' insertion, mutter intended fur publication 
should be himtf on the editor-jn-chtef's hook not late- 1 
than Monday noon or each week. 



,'..\Kditoi-in. chief 

Hifsinews Manager 

, Literary Editor 

. .'. ; ".'. .■..'. .'; : . . .Local KdHor 

, ^.JSxcba^e.Editnr 

Assoc. Husiriess Manager 
Subscription MivnitKer 

. ... . .AssncLncal Editors 

. .: ;,.. Alumni Editor 



A red mark across this item meuns that your suhserip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

'ElikAbbth'Syvekt. "oi. alumni editor, will be tthifl to' re- 
ceive any information,concerninK alumni.- 



Manhattan, Kan., Nov. 23, 1005. 




Two new subjects for- thought have, been 
presented to tlie editor, ami he now wishes to 
put them before the public, in .general. There 
has. been a belief among the mem hers of the 

, Athletic Association that the individuals who 
distinguish themselves, on, an athletic field 
should receive. some. commensurate reward. .for 
. their work and; their sacrifices. Several times 
in the past' the association,, has purchased 
sweaters, and monograms for certain men 
selected by a committee, w ( hich passes upon the 

• , eligibility of the men.. It is unnecessary to set 
forth the complication of feeling and sentiment 
that results from this plan.. We wish to dis- 
cu ss t he des i r ab i 1 i t y of es t a b 1 i s h i i i g a '] ) rece dent 
in the association that .may lead to embarrass- 
ment, .jealousy and bitter feeHng among, its 
, members, For this, year it would be an easy 
matter for us to purchase sweaters for the 
men, bat what of the years to follow? it will 
be, an advantage to the, club to keep its 
treasury at least above board, and the nionev 
may easily be put to good use for the general 



benefit of all... Granting;, that the association 
should not give sweaters to the men, we still 
think that they should be rewarded. This can 
best be done bv voting them the privilege of 
wearing the College monogram. Again the 
decision of eligibility comes in^ and to our 
mind some definite rule should' be adopted by 
the association which, will decide this point. 
A privilege to wear the monogram, should not 
be cheapened by 'making it general, nor should 
it be so strict as to dishearten all aspirants. 
Otlier colleges have a ruling that playing in 
live whole first-team football games makes a 
candidate eligible. The association should 
have a meeting directly after the K. V. game 
and institute a set of rules which shall define 
eligibility to wear the College monogram. As 
to sweaters for our football players, we hold 
that- they should have them, .bpt we can get 
them outside of the. association. Our Rooters' 
Clubs are strong organizations now and a 
sweater from the Clubs. with a monogram from 
the association should he as, acceptable and 
valuable to the College athlete as if both came 
from the one organization. If a sweater is 
given by the association it is purchased with 
money that he has earned. If it is given by 
the clubs it comes as a result of a sacrifice and 
as a personal recognization of worth and ex- 
pression of gratitude and appreciation from 
each individual concerned in the gift. These 
are. ; subjects that should be debated during 
this week I >y e ve ry st it dent in Col ] ege! Dec i - 
sion now will mean decision for all time. 



.The senior '.;Ag's" came forth one morning 
)ast,week with a. farmer's yell. This class of 
farmers is the first for several years to have a 
y.( 11. The A vel 1 rims like th is : *f 

. Hancock teste rs, Crop, rotations. 
Hi (5 fut steers on bulunced rations. 
■ - Oufls. the best of life';* joys; 

, We're the 'Cfi furmer boys. 



. An Opinion. 

.The Outlook, which has always been radi- 
cally opposed to football, printed last week 
a- fifteen-column article on the subject by Dr. 
.1. Wm. White, professor of surgery, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

.There is also a four-column editorial on the 
subject.. Doctor White says in part: "The 
, outcry against publicity, roughness, brutality, 
personal encounters and injuries, cunning and 
dishonorable, professionalism, widely sup- 
posed to accompany the game, are exaggerated 
and unjustifiable. The critics of the game are 
either ignorant of the facts or timid in their 
fears, or are in general opposed to all virile 
athletics or physical development." 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



151 



X Knockers 9 Corner X 

One day last week a prominent member of 
the Faculty who had beep absent from College 
for several days entered a class room and 
instead of taking up the day's lesson delivered 
a m:>ral lecture to the class on the subject of a 
student's duty to himself and 'the respect due 
Faculty regulations from the student body. 

The part of the talk that we heard we heartily 
endorse, but we .regret to say that the great t 
part was not heard from the fact that the words 
had to he forced through foul fumes of stale 
tobacco* thick enough to be cut with a knife. 

We 'admit that a student's pi ace d u r i ng class 
time is in the class room, but we'd like to ask 
if any instructor has the right to require a 
student to sit for an hour in a room reeking 
with odors a* obnoxious to the student as 
unexcused absences are to the instructor. We 
claim that even a student lias some rights, and 
that an instructor must respect these rights if 
he would win the respect of the student. 



If the foothall team is not the same 
As it was last year, and has lost a tnnne. 
My friend, its minfity poor taste in you 
To criticise what you couldn't flo; 
If you can't " boost.'* team this through anil Lhruiiirh. 
Don't knock. 
. - Ex. 



Souvenir of Willie. 

Willie was a gentle lad. 

tJeneial regrets 
Were felt when Willie one day took 
' To smoking cigarettes. 
Willie kept on pufllntr 
. Harder every day. 
Sister took the coupons: 

Srte put them all away. 

Willie dear has left us. 

Twas a mournful shock. 
Sister cashed the coupons in 

And trot a mantel clock. 
Now we gather round 1 it 

As the minutes tly; 
It is something lovely to 

Remember Willie by. 

Waithinuton 8tm 



Princeton's new tutorial plan is in operation 
th is fall. F i f t y in str u cto r s were en g aged d u r i n g 
the summer. They are college graduates and 
alumni of Princeton. It is the duty of these 
instructors to take charge. of students who fall 
behind in their studies. When a professor rinds 
one of his class behind in his work, and liable 
to fail on the next examination, lie informs one 
of the instructors. That o facial goes to the 
room of the laggard student and informs him 
that he is going to take him in charge. The 
student then devotes a certain amount of time 
each day to additional instruction. There is 
no publicity. The simple object in view is to 
get the student back in line with his class and 
and keep him in line so that he will pass his 
examination successfully.— Ex. 




"Opportunity knocks but once." Other 
knockers please copy. 

Nearly all the colleges have Rooters' Clubs 
now and they seem to be doing good work. 

After the shades of evening fall keep out of 
the way of drafts, but during business hours 
get all you can. 

There is a mandolin club in every class at 
Harvard. From these class clubs the best men 
are selected to make up the University club- 
There is considerable talk at present between 
Nebraska and K. U. of resuming athletic rela- 
tions. Neither side, however, seems to want to 
take the initiative. 

The annual picture exhibit of Kansas Univer- 
sity will b3 ready to open Decern ber i, to last 
one month. It is to consist of a story of the 
old Testament in pictures, which will make the 
exhibit of especial interest to all Bible students. 
Many famous paintings are to be found in the 
collection. 

Chancellor Strong, of K. U., is now suggest- 
ing another reform. He refers to the fraterni- 
ties and sororities this time. He wishes to 
decrease the number of regular parties given 
each year, as well as the expense connected 
with them. Last week he called two representa- 
tives from each organization before him and 
asked them to consider the matter. 

A certain dry -goods merchant is also a Sun- 
day-school teacher. Not long since, he gave a 
long discourse on the prodigal son, and after- 
wards asked with due solemnity if any one 
wanted to ask a question. Sissy Jones's hand 
shot up. "Very well," he said, "What is it 
you would like to know, Cecilia?" "Please, 
what's the price of them little pink parasols 
in your show window?" --££. 

"Rcxolveih 'That intercollegiate football in 
America is detrimental rather than a credit," 
is the subject chosen for the annual Harvard- 
Princeton debate. The choice of such a subject 
seems a little significant, and upon the result 
may depend the continuance or cessation of 
football as played at present in our colleges, 
for President Eliot, of Harvard, has expressed 
his Avell-known opinion quite freely concerning 
the game. If football should be dropped from 
the list of Harvard sports the game would be 
very apt to die in America. 



152 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Milo Hastings visited the A. B. society last 
Saturday. 

Manhattan Candy Kitchen, Saturday, No- 
vember 26. 

Miss Mary Haney, sophomore last year, was 
at College Friday. 

F. L. Osburn is out of College for awhile on 
account of sickness. 

Doctor Orr took a snap shot of the "Ag" 
corn pickers last week. 

The carpenters repaired some of the floor in 
the main hall Monday. 

Assistant Jackson ''toots" a horn in the 
Baptist Sunday-school. 

Frank Harris has a half-yard of hair ribbon 
that he cannot account for. 

Assistant Wheeler visited among old home 
folks around Burlington last week. 

Bern ice Deaver was out of College for a few 
days last week on account of sickness. 

Miss Grace Enlow, freshman last year, was 
visiting College and friends last week. 

Cant, Oskins, of the scrubs, had his thumb 
nail badly mashed during practice last Thurs- 
day. 

Miss Thayer's brother, of Topeka, was visit- 
ing his sister last week. He saw the boys beat 
Haskell. 

Miss Irraa Da vies, '(18, has dropped out of 
College and returned to her home in Clay 
county. 

" Banty " Williams is color or banner carrier 
for the Hooters' Club, Earl Thurston having 
resigned. 

The Horticultural Department wishes to an- 
nounce that it will have fresh lettuce for sale 
next week. 

One of the senior girls at the Haskell game 
was heard to remark: "How many halves do 
they play." 

Miss Viola Secrest, junior, has given up her 
College work and returned to her home in 
Randolph. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs, and Lockets at 
Askren's? 

Captain Shaffer has the lame "rookies" re- 
loading shells for target practice, during drill 
hours these days. 

Walter Zahnley, sophomore last year, was 
visiting College last Saturday. He it teaching 
school this year in Riley county. 



— 



Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs, and Lockets at 
Askren's V 

J. S.Furgus, of Olathe, Kan., was here vis- 
iting his son Howard last week. The College 
is greatly in advance of what he expected to 
see. 

Frank Ferris has been given charge of the 
basket-ball practice until after the football 
season. A number of men are out daily in the 
City Park. 

The individual encouragement which was 
given each member of the football team before 
the Haskell game, seems to have put them on 
their mettle. 

S. S. Fay, '05, has resigned his position as 
sugar chemist for the Beet Sugar. Company, of 
Rockyford, Colo., and has taken up advanced 
work in chemistry. 

One of the Haskell Indians was heard to 
remark about the "good playing of our Indian 
quarterback in the second half." He had 
reference to C. B. Kirk. 

.Miss Cecilia Augspurger, of the Music De- 
partment, left for Farmer City, 111., Monday 
afternoon, where she was called on account of 
her father's serious illness. 

It is naturally expected that seniors have 
little trouble remembering. However, one 
senior missed first-hour class one day because 
he had forgotten his necktie. 

Pres. E. R. Nichols, Mrs. Nichols and son 
Rae, returned from Washington, D. C, Mon- 
day afternoon. President Nichols represented 
the College at the Institute of Experiment Sta- 
tions. 

Herbert Shearer, freshman last year and right 
end on last year's football team, came down 
last Friday to see the boys beat Haskell. He 
is at present working at his home in Marshall 
county. 

The Manhattan high school football team 
defeated the freshmen scrubs last Saturday by 
the score of 21 to 0. The high school team 
contained several fellows of twenty-five years 
of age. 

E. H. Webster, head of the Dairy Depart- 
ment at Washington, D. C, inspected every- 
thing along that line here last Saturday. He 
said he was well pleased with the showing made 
by the "butter makers." 

The '07 class is well represented this year on 
the gridiron. The following have played in 
one or more College games : f 'aptain Scholz, 
Mallon, Nystrom, Montgomery, Lindsey, 
Walker, Harris, and Cooley. 

Work was begun on the excavation for the 
new Horticultural building last week. The 
building when completed will be equipped for 
the Horticultural Department in the first floor, 
and the second story will be used for the De- 
partment of Botany. 

Last Wednesday evening a crowd of twelve 
girls from the Y. W. C. A. Home drove out to 
the lake, where they ate supper by the light of 
a camp-fire. After various amusements, they 
drove, home by moonlight making the night 
merry with old-time songs. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



153 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



j Tailor at 
A your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



Shoes repaired 
while you wait 



t 



Remember sale Saturday at Manhattan 
Candy Kitchen. 

Some pipe fittings were being made Monday 
under the machine-shop floor. 

The fir st- team football boys had their photo- 
graph taken Monday afternoon. 

W. Sparks, of Lincoln, Kan., was visiting 
Al. and Bobbie Cassell last Monday. 

Everybody who possibly could took a tramp 
over Bluemont, or Iff. Prospect last Sunday. 

Assistant Anderson, of the Physics Depart- 
ment, spent Sunday at his home, near Ran- 
dolph. 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. C. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs and Lockets at 
Askren's? 

Have you seen the new K. S. A. 0. Hat Pins, 
Stick Pins, Brooches, Fobs, and Lockets at 
Askren's? 

Prof, and Mrs. J. D. Walters, spent Sunday 
and Monday with their son Boliver, at 
Marysville. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. McLaughlin, of West- 
moreland, Kan., are visiting with Mr. Lewis 
and family. 

B. S. Orr and S. R. Tillbury, both of the 
'07 class, have charge of the engine used in 
rolling the new oil road. 

The senior D. S. girls are doing their cook- 
ing now by electricity. The laboratory was 
equipped with the apparatus last week. 

Assistants Mathewson and Freeman went 
squirrel hunting one day last week. The Farm 
Department hauled the game and hunters home. 

The Printing Department published a Y. M. 
C. A. pamphlet this week. The book contains 
the floor plans and an outside view of the new 
Y. M. C. A. building. 

The sophomore class will announce their 
colors soon. They are waiting to hear from 
the Diamond Dye Company to see whether 
their colors can be made or not. 

The State Normal team beat Fairmount, 11 
to 0, November 13, at Emporia. It is reported 
as a clean, hard-fought game. The Fairmount 
team was given a reception that night by the 
"Teachers/' 




G. H. Kellogg, *06, was visiting College last 
Friday. 

G. A. Bower, junior in '90, is combining ag- 
riculture and osteopathy at Eureka. 

W. H. Spencer, '02, is doing a rushing busi- 
ness in live stock near Yates Center. 

Edith McDowell, '93, and Mrs. D. C. Mc- 
Dowell are visiting Mrs. Ash ford Stingley. 

S. S. Fay, '05, returned to College last week 
to take up postgraduate work in chemistry. 

Carl Thompson, '04, who is farming north of 
here on the Blue, spent Sunday in Manhattan. 

Edith Huntress. '01, went to Enterprise last 
Wednesday to attend the wedding of Miss 
Olivia Staatz. 

Miss Crete Spencer, '05, is running a new 
Underwood typewriter for the Animal Hus- 
bandry Department. 

H. A. Burt, '05, visited his brother and 
friends of College Hill over Sunday. He is 
farming near Bronson, Kan. . 

L. M. Posey, a former member of the class 
of '00, and Miss Eva Paris were married at 
Larned, Kan., on November 8. 

Orr Henderson, sophomore '01, is doing a 
prosperous stock business eight miles east of 
Eureka, His son is partner in the business* 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Walters have rooms at 
the Kimball house, corner Poyntz Avenue and 
Sixth street, where they are at home to their 
many friends. 

Russell Oakley, '03, was about College a few 
days last week. From here he went south, and 
expects to return to Washington, D. C, the 
last of the month. 

i. C. and Mary Wilkin, students in the early 
'90's, and S. I. Wilkin, short-course student 
last year, attended the institute held by the in- 
stitute train at Phillipsburg. 

L. L. Wilson, sophomore in '03, visited the 

Missouri Pacific institute car at ElDorado. 

He reports having taken a business course at 

Wichita last winter and is now doing high- 

I grade stock farming near Benton. 



154 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The College Grocery and Meat Market 



Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Cured Meats, 
• Fruits and Candies 



1 (t(» Mum St. 
Phone 227 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



We deTTver 
goods promptly 1 



* 999* 9*99 ?¥** *¥9¥9999$¥¥* ¥*¥*#¥*# ***** ¥99 **** 9 ******************** 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

AT ENGEL BROTHERS 



John Sessler, short course in '03 and '04, 
came over from Uniontown to Ft. Scott to 
meet the institute train. He says h? is success- 
fully putting into practice the principles lie 
learned while at K. S. A. (.'. 

Mary Colliver, '05, wpites from her home in 
<*ttlva. Kan., that she, witli her father, mother 
and sister expect to start for California- soon. 
where they will spend the winter in hopes of 
hpnefitiny her father's health. 

While on his way home from the Missouri 
Pacific institute trip. Professor Dickens at- 
tended the flower show at Kansas City. C, A, 
Chandler. '(HI. who is superintendent of park 
planting in' Kimsas City, and his brother, M, 
E. Chandler, student in ''90 to 'li:t, had charge 
of a part of the exhibit. Minnie ( Ilomirk ) 
Chandler, '!)4. and Kusehia (Knipe) Curtis are 
amony others who were taking in the sights of 
the show, which was certainly worth attending. 

The, Hick a ld is always glad to correct its 
mistakes. The following from Click Fockele, 
M)2, explains itself: u l note with considerable 
surprise I am running the Reporter at this place, 
and that the He porter was 'formerly owned by 
my father.' There is nothing wrong in either 
statement, but the local is apt to bo miscon- 
strued. To b? exact, I am manager and general 
outside rustler for the Reporter, and also for 
our fire-insurance business. My father is still 
in the editorial harness, a fact which many of 
his acquaintances in the College Faculty and 
the Alumni will be glad to know. He still owns 
the Reporter. While in Kansas City last month 
I met C. R. Shepherd, *02. 'Shep' is still 
treasurer of the Orpheum, at a good salary. I 
also saw 'Rusty' Rodgers, '(4, who is a "mail 
clerk on the 'Frisco. Miss Eva Rigg, '01, is 
also in Kansas City. She is teaching domestic 
science at the Fiske Training School for dea- 
conesses.'' 



It is second nature for some persons to 
neat and clean in everything they do. 



be 




Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Home-made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

/- — - MANUFACTURERS 0F_ ^-^ 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators. 
Safety Corn Harvesters, Futile Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights. Chimney Clips. Struetural Iron Work. 
Slove Rep&Irs, etc. I'M on t< fl. 

Manhattan, Kan. . 706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEADER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



i'HOVESSIONAL. 
DK. <i. A. CIUSE, DENTIST. 



31 years of. continuous praetiee should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. M< K i;i:. DKNTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Ofllce in Huntress Building. 327Povrttz. 
Over the Slur Grocery, rhones: Office fits; Res, '63. ' 



1)H. J. K. TAYLOR, DKNTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 1 in Union National Bunk Building. ,Hne 
gold work u specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 806 R e8 . Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 807 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD 




I 



Saturday 
Sal 



Y 



November 

Twenty-Fifth 




; 



L 



MANHATTAN 

Candy Kitchen 



tf We are going to make and sell 
our deliciour mixed Butter Cups at 
20 cents a pound. <J Drop in and 
see us make them. IJ Cocoanut 
Brittle at 15 cents a pound; two 
pounds (or 25 cents. 



I 



J 




Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in and see our eight-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains. Prices, $1.00 and upward. 



^ 



Co-operative 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention 

Chas. S. Jones, 



Manage 



r Bookstore : 



J 



t 



Manhattan Electric-Lighted. Buses and Hacks 



Transfer 
Line 



Meet all trains day or nigrht. LARGE 
WAGONETTS and PARK PHAE- 
TONS suitable for class parties etc. 
Let us call your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a specialty. 



H. J. Barnhouse L. W. Phillips 



wmmsmmm 



156 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Students Co-op. 



Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals, 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the. College bookstore. 



, J 



H. H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS Mk 


Special Rates to Students. Work Called For and 

Promptly Delivered 

■ 




Model Laundry 

BOYLE & BELL, Props. 

* 
i 


PHOTOS ^)g|r 

221 Poynti Avenue 


EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue. - - Phone 74 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Western Poultry Review 

Subscription Price, 12 Cents a Year, 

Up-to-date Job Printing 

REVIEW PRINTING CO. Manhattan, Kan. 

Over Union National Bank. 

cmmc THAT 

ODEL/J GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry, 

Geo. T, Fielding 8r Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



', 



\ SHOES 



Of Style 
& Service 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT ! 

THE PEOPLE 

HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 

Roberts & Ottowa~&°thiers 



5 



- V 




} 









anf H 



.' 



_re^ 



•■v *i\' »r**^ii»i nV^ 



LB Jv*B > ^v . ^v^ & S ~ S ^ ^ - ^^ . 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. XXX X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING 



Our Uffe experience in handling rfudent trade daring many 
yeen enable* us to meet their want* exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN. KAN. 



************************** 



Tf mt 



^ii.^i^,^ . ^^.^.^"^^yy y yy< 



We have been busy changing our store so as to handle our Big holi- 
day Trade more conveniently, and repainting and papering 
so as to display to the best advantage the 

Best Lot of Holiday Goods 



Jn£ B HHWE VBT HHD- 



We have received a Large tine of Fancy Work, both finished articles and 

goods to be made up, and 

Now is the Time to Get these Goods 

while there is plenty of time to make them up. We also have displayed a 
Large Factory Line of Fancy Box Papers and Cloth Weave Paper and Envel- 
opes in bulk, which we are selling at popular prices. 



THE BIG RACKET 



\ . 



r 




*9Che Students' Herald 



*m 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College A A 





Thanksgiving Number 



i 




\ 



- 



Keuffel & Esser Co. 



* OF N 

813 Locust Street, 



YORK * 

Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraa-on" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES JEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS U L L ,s). 

BOO-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



Headquarters 

For Christmas Gifts 



STUDENT FRIENDS 



Christmas is not far off and 
it is probable that you have 
a father, mother or some 
friend whom you are going 
to make a gift. Our Big 
Jewelry Sale begins De- 
cember 1st. We offer at this 
sale one of the largest stocks 
of WATCHES, JEWELRY 
of all kinds, Silverware, Cut 
Glass and Hand-painted 
China at big reduced prices. 
We would be glad to show 
every student our line. 



ASKREN, 



The Jeweler 

and 

Optician 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town (or passen- 
gers. X> Xr 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable (or class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



\ 



■■■i 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



157 



Wolf's Cottage Studio 




Opposite Carnegie Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market, 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



R B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



2 H> Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS Si. 00 
302 Poyntz P. C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS ; Guaranteed Cutlery 

THE BARBERS RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 

offer you only the best, *v *v 

W, M. STESTGLEY & CO. 



On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine lineclgarsand toilet articles 



■■* 



158 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry "Goods Room, 

Hand-hag's, leather or 
silk Belts, Neckwear, Roy- 
al Worcester Corsets, 
fast black Hosiery, Rib- 
bons, Velvets, etc. 

ReadyvtcWear Room, 

In this Department you 
will find Furs, Corset 
Covers, Aprons, C a p s, 
Sweaters, Silk Petticoats, 
Paper Patterns, etc. 



Hardware Department. 

Heating Stoves, Ranges, 
Granite Ironware. Pocket- 
knives, Table Cutlery, 
Razors, Bicycles, etc. 



Groceries. 

That student life is 
sometimes a strenuous life 
you are well aware: you 
need good F(X)D to keep 
you in good health. We 
can supply you with pure 
goods at moderate prices. 



Shoe Department. 

If you buy shoes that re- 
quire '•breaking" before 
they are comfortable to 
the feet, you have simply 
made a mistake in the 
m a k e. Krippendorf-Dit- 
tmann and Rice & Hutch- 
in gs make Shoes that are 
easy to wear. We are 
agents for these desirable 
goods. 



Queens ware, Glassware, 
Lamps- etc, Fancy China, 
Japanese Ware, 



We deliver (roods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting writing and toilet rooms upstairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for £>ry-Good», Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Paste In Your Hat 




THIS LITTLE MOTTO: 

"Courtney's Full- Vamp Shoe* an Good 
Enough for Me/' 



SOLD ONLY BY 



THE LEADER 

MOORE BROTHERS & COMPANY 




Do Not 



I HOUSE OF 



Wait 



For a day with zero 
weather to hiiy your 
heavy suit and overcoat. 
Follow the wise one and 
make your selection now 
at the store where the 
best selections are to he 
had. 



Young men's suits 

nobby patterns, 

$10 to $20 



Young men's swell 

overcoats. 72 to 

75-Inch sweep, 

$8.50 to $25 



Rain Coats— Some new ones Just In, 
$l0to$20. 



E. L. Knostman. 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students CVTme 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Mottx>:lietEveiyOne Cultivate His OoioGenias. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., November 30, 1905. 



Number 12 



Out to Gran' ma's. 

O, I tell you boys, its heaps o' fun 
To ko out totiran'ma's house ; 
You needn't be so careful 
Nor as quiet as a mouse. 

We alius tro Thanksidvin' day. 
An' all our kin is sometimes there; 
An" ma, she tells us to be trood— 
But Qran'ma. she don't care. 

An' O. we have such piles to eat — 
Why I j 1st stuff till I can't s waller: 
An" if I'd take another bite 
I couldn't even holler: 

(Irnn'ma's alius cheerful like. 
An' when it comes a rainy day. 
Why, there's her trreat bitr trarret 
Where its just jrreat to play. 

An' when we've pretty near trot tired 
O' playin' "Buffalo Bill" an' shootin' bears. 
We hear her steps a-comin' 
Up the old an* creakin' stairs. 

An' the minute she comes through the door. 
The bestes smell jist tills the room; 
An' there shell have the nicest lot 
O" doughnuts, what's jist done. 

She lets us bovs just eat 'em up. 
An' don't seem to think they're wasted 
When all of us up and declare 
They're the best we've ever tasted. 

I tell you what, (iran'ma's the stuff. 
When ft comes to havtn fun; 
An' if you haven't trot a irran'ma 
My advice is— tdt you one: 

— HKLEN C. WKS1XJATK. (>7. 



The Thanksgiving Victory. 

John Rowland was sitting in his room read- 
ing a letter. His face showed the signs of an 
inward struggle and looked haggard and pale 
by the dim light of an old tin lamp on the table. 

Rowland was one of the best students in Joule 
College, at Faraday, and by far the best quarter- 
back who had yet played on the school's foot- 
ball team. John was a worker; When he 
studied he concentrated every nerve on his les- 
sons and at football he threw every ounce into 
the plays. These qualities, together with his 
good-natured disposition, had made for him 
scores of friends. 

The team for the season had shown up won- 
derfully well. Out of the seven games played 



only two had been lost, which was exactly the 
reverse of the results the previous year. The 
coach had ascribed much of the team's success 
to Rowland's brilliant work, for John loved 
the game and was never happier than when 
struggling on the gridiron. But all good 
things have an end, and so it seemed must be 
the fate of John's playing. 

Rowland was in college entirely dependent 
upon his own resources, and it cost not a little 
for him to play when he sorely needed the 
money which that time, otherwise spent, might 
have brought him. The year before he had 
held out until mid-term; this year he had man- 
aged, by careful planning, to stay with the 
team until within two weeks of Thanksgiving, 
when its last game would he played. There 
was no alternative: he must quit practice and 
secure work. 

He told the coach, very quietly, the follow- 
ing morning that his work on the team must 
come to a close. The coach opened his eyes in 
astonishment. "Why John," he said, "we 
can no more afford to lose you now than we 
can afford to buy out John Rockefeller. We' ve 
simply got to keep you. What's the trouble, 
an v way?'' 

John at last blurted out his story. The 
coach listened attentively, then said: "Well, as 
our finances now stand the association can not 
well afford to pay for your schooling; besides, 
it is against our rules. But I will loan you 
enough to last you through the season. ■ ' John 
declined the offer, but after much persuasion 
finally said: "Well, I'll do it: not for my sake, 
but for the sake of our team if my staying will 
help it win our last game." 

This being settled, practice continued undis- 
turbed and the team was showing line prog- 
ress. All hoped the team would win the 
Thanksgiving game against Prevost College. 



160 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



even though for many years Joule had been 
beaten bf tli.ni in every athletic contest. 

A bitter enmity existed between Joule and 
Prevost. Joule had ill ways \v:>a in tests of 
scholarship while PrevOat had won on tli i 
fields, Each succeeding year- had brought 
Joule Bearer and nearer to victory, and this 
year each player was determined to win. 
Nearly all fvlt confident of winning with 
Rowland at quarter. lie had pulled the team 
out of many a tight place h.'fnv and would 
net fail them now. 

Two days before the game Rowland received 
a letter from his uncle, unci it was in the con- 
sideration of this that we found him at the 
opening of the story. The contents of the let- 
ter was as follows: 

"My dear nephew. Now that 1 am getting 
older 1 realize the need of a young man at my 
side. The business is getting too much forme, 
and knowing your hard circumstances thought f 
would give you a chance to better them. If you 
will come here before three days I'll give you a 
position as rny secretary, and it is quite possi- 
ble tli at Rowland & Rowland may be the name 
of the firm in the near future. You need not 
answer this, but remember that the chance is 
open for three days only. Your uncle, 

J. J. Rowland." 

Rowland read the letter over and over. "Yes, 
I should say, 'hard circumstances,*" 1k> said. 
''Why on earth should this come just at this 
moment? If he had only waited a week or even 
two days. But 1 can't go now. We must win 
from Prevost as, with the substitute's ankle 
hurt, the game is almost sure to be lost if t go." 
Then again he thought of the opportunity which 
was presented to him in the tetter. "What is 
the use," he thought, "of letting this chance of 
a lifetime slip just for a football ganu Y But, 
no! I can't disgrace myself in that way." 
Thus he argued with himself until nearly mid- 
night. The question must be decided before 
morning but how? The lamp flickered and 
finally went out. The room grew cold, ;*nd.-.till 
Rowland had not decided. At last be rose. 
"I'll go," he said. "This fooling around trying 
to make one cent do the work of live is all right 
in theory but not in practice. If 1 go and 
never come back no one will care," He began 
preparations for departure the next da". On 
meeting the coach he colored a little, hut other- 
wise showed no signs of his inward battle. 
"It is best." he thought, "to keep it to myself: 
it will be bad enough when I am gone." 

Next morning before daylight he stole from 
the house and was soon a hoard the train on 
the way to Duhmg. As the train rolled on- 
ward his mind gradually recovered from the 



stupor in which i! hud been for the last day 
and he b »gan seeing things in a different light. 
What was hi* doinjf? Could it ba possible that 
he, John Rowland, was turning traitor to 
Joule. The thought aroused him. No ! he 
would never be a traitor for all the money 
that his uncle possessed. Rather die a pauper 
than 1*3 called a coward. He must get back in 
time for the game. It was now nearly twelve 
o'clock. Could bo get back in time? It seemed 
as if a train never moved slower than that one 
did in reaching' the m>xt station. 

As soon as the train stopped he rushed to 
the window and secured a ticket to Kara day. 
Fortune seemed to favor him. for in fifteen 
minutes a train would be going hack again. 
Those fifteen minutes seemed as ages tw him. 
When he did get started he longed to help 
move the train faster and each stop seemed 
an hour to him. The game was to be called 
at three o'clock. If all went well he might get 
there in time if it should be called a little late. 

At Joule none missed Rowland until time for 
dressing. Palling t> make his appearance 
they at first became surprised, then alarmed. 
"Where is Rowland?" was the question asked 
on all sides. No one knew. Word was sent 
to his lodging place and it was learned that he 
had left, but when; was not known. 

Every thing became confusion. Who would 
[day quarter-lur . !c for them was the thought 
uppermost in their ; linds. Outside of Kelvin, 
the substitute. Dalton was the only other man 
who had ever played the position, and he never 
failed to lose his head at some critical period. 
Without Bowl and defeat was almost certain, 
and it was a rather dejected set of players which 
entered the gridiron a few minutes after three 
o'clock. However, cheered by the rooters, tiny 
took t'u ir j daces with Dalton at quarter deter- 
mined to do their best. 

The referee's whistle blew and the game 
began, ft was Prevost's kick-off, anil at, the 
first down t'leball was in Joule's possession on 
their thirty-yard line. After two downs and a 
costly fumble by Dalton they were forced to 
punt. In turn Prevost had to punt, and Joule 
again bad the ball. Here the hard work began 
and Joule made good progress and was on Pre- 
vost's twenty-yard line when the quarter again 
fumbled. A Prevost player secured the ball, and 
before be could be stopped he had made a touch- 
down. Prevost failed to kick goal and the score 
stood live to nothing. 

The teams now ..j-e- sawed across the field, 
neitlu r making gr.*;.L gains. Toward the latter 
part of the half Prevost seemed to have the 
better of Joule ai.l were slowly but surely 
crowding them toward their goal. The whistle 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



161 



blew just us the ball was on Joule's live-yard 
line. This and nothing else prevented Provost 
IVom scoring a second touch-down. 

Tlif Prevost rooters were jubilant, of course 
they would win again tins year, as they had al- 
ways done. Joule on the other side saw little 
hope The coach tried toeheer tin 1 players and 
wondered all the while where 1 low land could be. 
At the beginning of fche second half Joule 
seemed to brace up a little, but again Prevost 
pushed them harder and fche ball was again in 
Prevost's possession and <>n Joule's ten-yard 
line. 

Suddenly, fche figure Of I man was seen 
running across the Held. All recognized Row- 
land in an instant. Mis breath was nearly 
gone, but his eyes sparkled eager for the fray. 
Time was called, and in about two minutes 
Howl and had donned a suit and was behind 
the line in his old place. 

EJvery man on the Joule team grew stronger, 
was encouraged by his presence, and From this 
moment nothing could penetrate the Joule line 
nor Stop their advance. Prevost tried for a 
Held goal hut failed. The Joule players now 
simply waded through Prevost's line, and 
lief ore the etui of the game the score stood 
fifteen to live in Joule's favor. 

Joule was frantic with joy and the rooters 
were not satisfied until they had carried each 
individual player off the lield. Rowland, too. 
was for a moment carried away with the joy of 
victory, but in the dressing room, when praised 
by the coach and team, said: "No. fellows, I 
do not deserve your approval; 1 was a traitor 
and a coward. 1 ran away for my own selfish 
aims, but am glad that I got back .in time to 
help old Joule out. If you would only censure 
me I should feel inueh better." < >f course none 
listened to this, as all w^Vi 1 too happy to think 
of anything else but the grand victory. 

In the evening at the annual reception for 
the team. Rowland was the hero of the hour 
and when called on for a speech could not re- 
frain from telling how near he had turned from 
loyalty to his school. All thought more of him 
for bis manly confession, and when again in 
his room he could not help thinking that, after 
all, in spite of crusty old uncles or hard cir- 
cumstances, loyalty to one's cause pays much 
better than money or position. 



The Corn and Wheat Train. 

The Kansas corn and wheat train run by the 
('. R. I. & P. Ry. Co. completed its two weeks 
tour Saturday. November 1H, The train con- 
sisted of a baggage-car, two audience cars, and 
two combination sleeping- and dining-cars. 
Thirty-minute stops were made at nearly every 



station on the Rock Island System in this State, 
the total number of st:>ps being one hundred 
forty-six. At each station as a rule, two lec- 
tures were delivered, one on wheat and one on 
corn, the farmers making a choice between the 
audience cars aecording to which lecture they 
desired to hear. 

The Rock Island Railway < 'ompany paid all 
the expenses of the trip, while the College fur- 
nished the speakers. The lecturers were Pro- 
fessors Willard and TenKyck and Assistant 
Professor Sboesmith. Professor Willard spoke 
on wheat and Professor Shoesinith on corn, 
while Processor TenKyck spoke on either wheat 
or corn, relieving the other lecturers. Thus 
each of the speakers spoke two-thirds of the 
time and delivered an average of eight thirty- 
minute lectures per day. President Nichols 
acted as director of the party during the lirst 
few days of the tour*, when he was obliged to 
leave the party in order to attend the meeting 
of the Association of Agricultural Colleges 
and Kxperiment Stations. November M. at 
Washington, I). (.'. The train was also ac- 
companied throughout the trip by several 
Bock Island railway officials, as well as hy 
several newspaper reporters. 

The attendance at the different stations varied 
from a few persons to audiences so large 
that the two audience cars eould not accommo- 
date the people; something over nine thousand 
farmers visited the cars and heard the lectures. 
The speakers devoted considerable time to the 
discussion of corn breeding and better seed 
wheat, while the subjects of thorough tillage 
and maintaining soil fertility received some 
attention. On tin 1 whole it appears that the 
tour has been a decided success, and the lec- 
tures were well received by the farmers with 
scarcely an exception* Without douht much 
bene tit will he derived from this tour and the 
lectures which were delivered to the farmers 
throughout the State. A large number of 
farmers w^ro interested in better farming, and 
it is evident that many friends were made for 
the Agricultural College. Also, the Rock 
Island railway officials seemed to he well 
pleaded and pronounce the venture a great suc- 
cess. The lour was entirely a husiness propo- 
sition with the railway company, which hopes 
to reap a large, interest on the money spent by 
hauling to market the larger crops which the 
farmers may grow hy following out the new sug- 
gestions and better methods of farming outlined 
in the lectures. 



Viewed from any angle, ignorance is the 
costliest crop that can be raised in any part of 
the Union. litHixereit. 



102 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motw LrrCvenY 
OncCwltwatcHi* 

OWNGtMUV'+- 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan, Kan., as second- 
class matter, 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies. Ave cents. 



F. A. Kiene. Jr.. 06 ..Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hum 'Ofi Business Manager 

E. 0, Farbab. '07 Literary Editor 

(J. 0. Kahl. W Local Editor 

Mattik Pi'rrMAN. 'OR Exchange Editor 

Cawhol Walker, '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. "07 Subscription Manager 

\gSSB& f A — **» » ™ ito ~ 

Eu/.akkth Swbet, *04.. Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxbn. '08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not lateJ 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04, alumni editor, will be glad lo re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Nov. 30, 1905. 




" When the frost is on the pumpkin,*' as our friend. Jim 

Riley, sipgs. 
And you hear the turkey's gobble, then you think you're 

growin' wings. 
But the world seems even sweeter yet, as Riley won't 

deny. 
When the turkey's on the table, an' the pumpkins in the 

pie. — Ex. 



Thanksgiving Day, with all its opportunities 
for pleasure, praise and thankfulness, is here. 
It is indeed a time when we should count our 
blessings, hut remember that a rudy face, a 
bright smile and a cheery word are the signifi- 
cant emblems of the day rather than austerity 
and darkness and seclusion. 



As the first Friday in December falls within 
the limits of our vacation, our fall election of 
Herald staff officers must of necessity be post- 
poned one week. One week from Friday, at 
3:30 o'clock, the stockholders will meet in 
South Society Hall. The following officers 
are to be elected: Literary editor, exchange 
editor, associate business manager, two asso- 
ciate local editors, alumni editor, reporter, 



and an executive committee of five members. 
Other business will be brought before the 
meeting. Every stockholder should be present 
and imbued with the desire and determination 
to do his utmost for the paper. We must have 
this sentiment among the stockholders, and 
we feel the lack of it. 



The Y. M. C. A. has recently issued a neat 
pamphlet reviewing the building fund campaign 
and giving a view of the building, with Hoor 
plans accompanying. The pamphlet is ex- 
pected to be a factor in securing the remainder 
of the fund and will undoubtedly meet expec- 
tations. 

Thursday afternoon our football team enters 
the lists for the last time this season. As time 
draws near for thedisbandment of the team, we 
are depressed with a complication of feelings 
that is hard to explair. One sensation is that 
of relief and thankfulness that we will be per- 
mitted for a few weeks to give our undivided 
attention to our books and classes, and the 
other is that of regret that a bunch of public- 
spirited, whole-hearted and loyal young men is 
to be no longer actively before us to call forth 
our admiration and applause. But our athletic 
interest and enthusiasm will not die with the 
end of the season. It will only smoulder in 
its depths to break out afresh next spring and 
in the fall with renewed and redoubled vigor. 
In this, the last game of the season, we should 
all work to make every phase of it most pleas- 
ant and agreeable. Every one should attend 
the game and every player should do his part 
to make this the crowning victory of the season. 
The game bids fair to be one of the hardest of 
the season, for the Normal has been doing good 
work of late. In spite of the defeat at K. TJ. , 
our boys will be in fair shape and able to put 
up a game that will be no discredit to them- 
selves or the scbool. Everyone, come out to 
the game! 

K. U. Won. 

For the first time this season our football 
players met their superiors, when they were de- 
feated on McCook field, at Lawrence, last Sat- 
urday, by a score of 28 to 0. Our boys played 
hard and fast, but the handicap of weight was 
too much to overcome. The College boys were 
gi,me to the last. Not a man "quit," and we 
are just as proud of them as if they had won. 
No one feels the defeat worse than the men who 
lost, and it is the duty of every student to show 
his appreciation of their work. 

The team was accompanied to Lawrence by 
six hundred rooters and the College band. 
The rooting was fine. It was almost like being 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



163 



at home. The K. U. supporters were taken by 
surprise, and the famous "Rock Chalk" yell 
was heard only when our rooters would stop 
for breath. Our band attracted much atten- 
tion, both by their appearance and playing. 
K. U. got some pointers on how a team should 
be supported. 

The game was a punting exhibition from the 
start to the finish. Pooler did the foot-work 
for K. U. , while Kirk and Scholz booted the 
hall for the College. Scholz easily did the best 
punting, his work being much better than that 
of the opposing captain. 

Our line held well during the game on all 
plays except the cross-tackle bucks by Donald 
and Brunner. These two little fellows of two 
hundred twenty and two hundred forty pounds, 
were the only men who could be counted on for 
gains. Time after time the Kansas backs would 
fail on two attempts to advance the ball and 
then one of the big tackles would be called on 
for a gain. The K. U. backs were weak on 
offense, but did good work on defense. Pooler 
tried quarter-back runs several times during 
the game, but he seldom gained, Cooley 
broke through and downed him with no gain 
one time, while Kirk downed him for a ten- 
yard hiss on another attempt. 

The work of our back-lield was good, espe- 
cially on defense. Captain Scholz played like 
a demon in backing up the .line. Time after 
time he would down K. U. back before the ball 
reached the line. Kirk's handling of the ball 
was faultless. Mallon and Nystrom played 
hard and fast, and each did good work when 
playing safety. Cunningham, who went to 
quarter after Kirk took Mai Ion's place at half, 
did some fine tackling. He stopped big Brun- 
ner once after a forty-yard gain, and on the 
next play he downed Pooler after a fifteen -yard 
run. Blake did fine work in breaking interfer- 
ence, and several times he downed the runner 

for a loss. 

The first touch-down was made in seven and 
three-fourths minutes, but the winners had to 
fight for twenty -two minutes before they again 
crossed the goal line. Tn the last half K. U. 
scored three times, but Pooler missed two goals. 

K.U. K. S.A.C. 

Milton - C Whipple 

SSSoUtt R-« Gstlund, Wilber 

Reed, Root L.G Barman 

Brunner, Htriekler R.T ...Cooley 

Donald.! L-T Montgomery 

Wilson. White RE FiSSSS 

K„u<j e L. E Lindsey 

Pooler '(CapU.'.V. Q-. Kirk. C tmnin«hum 

Au«nev. Myers. R. H ■ ■ ■ -Nystrom 

Miller, Brawley L.H. Mullon Kirk 

White. Brunner F.B <Capt.) Scholz 

Touch-downs : Donald, 2 ; Brunner, 2; Rouse, 
1. Goals: Pooler,:). Officials: Anderson, of 
Missouri: Swearingen, of Ft. Leavenworth. 




Four Hi in us a man must leam to do 
If he would make his record true. 
To think without confusion clearly, 
To love his fellow-men sincerely. 
To act from honest motives purely. 
To trust in God securely.— Vim Puke. 

Knowledge crammed, fades like the curling of 
smoke. —.Ex. 

Baker will debate with K. U.» Washburn, 
and S. W. K. college this year. 

All things come to those who wait, but when 
they come they're out of date.— Ex. 

At Wisconsin University the senior engi- 
neers, both mechanical and electrical, take an 
Eastern trip each year. 

A southern cornetist named Burst has three 
children— Alice May Burst, James Wood 
Burst, and Henry Will Burst. — Ex. 

Wm. Jennings Bryan has donated $250 to 
Nebraska University, the yearly income of 
which is to be given to the student writing the 
best essay on the science of government. 

A recent bequest to Smith College consists of 
a house and grounds on the hill overlooking 
the college. The place is to be fitted up and 
used as a retreat for overworked students. 

It is dangerous business to wait for oppor- 
tunities, as waiting will become such a fixed 
habit that energy will be liable to ooze out be- 
fore opportunity arrives,— Ex. 

There is a recent rule at Dartmouth which 
requires each undergraduate to pay an annual 
fee of five dollars for athletics. The faculty 
members were chief instigators of the move- 
ment. 

Believe that your class is the best in the 
school and do your best to prove it, in ath- 
letics, studies, and all legitimate ways; and 
know that your college is the best in the state, 
and prove it when you leave by showing that 
you are better mentally, morally, and phys- 
ically than when you entered.— Ex. 

Even President Roosevelt, strenuous as he 
is, objects to football as it is so often played 
to-day. He and Secretary Taft are now con- 
templating a movement, the purpose of which 
is to remove all brutality from football. Sec- 
retary Taft has been heard to say that any 
West Point cadet who uses unnecessary rough- 
ness in the game will be expelled. 



HW 



TUK STUDENTS' HERALD. 




N«n\ is the lime lo help the lesiin: 
\'i»w is the lime In irci up steiim: 
Now is tlii- i in ie to lend ii tin ml: 
Soli'ts ; 1 11 join | he roller--' band. A'.''. 

Shattuck got i K. r. banner. 

Read Askren's Christmas atl. on Bret page. 

rapt. P. M. Shutter winl to K. IT. to see the 

^iiiit 1 . 

Harold Adds was ushering visitors around 
( 'ollejre ):i>l week. 

Kurle Shattuck is spending his Thanksgiving 
iif his brothers, in Topekft, 

Miss I iiil ii Carlatt, freshman last year, is 
spending her Thanksgiving in Manhattan. 

Tin* frame-work for Professor Walter* 1 new 
house, on IMin in nil avenue, was i»nt up last 

we 'k. 

Several rooters eame very, near being "run 
in" one ni'jiit recnth for yelling while down 
town. 

Henry, the little son o| Prof, ami Mrs. E. B. 
,\lc( ' irmirk. was quite sirk last week, but is 
now recovering. 

The new oil road, which was opened for 
traffic las! week, is rnltilliiiL'* t.h ■■ predictions 
that were made for it. 

'The Prea Methodists of Manhattan ran say 
"O HeekJ*' uihI not )» ■ usiny slang or cuss 
words, for he is their pastor. 

Season tickets For the lecture course may be 
reserved between 1:00 anil ;»:nn i>. ai,. Wednes- 
dsiy. November J!), at the Auditorium, 

Carl Miller wen), from St. Mary's to 
Lawrence, last Saturday, to see the game. 
" I key" will be in school again nexl term. 

Several hoys were heard to remark about the 
University stand pipe : "If Janitor Lewis would 
see that stand pipe, it would make him sick." 

The odd Fellows 1 and Rebecca lodges of Man- 
hattan are working to have the stale odd I«V1- 
Imvs" Orphans 1 home located ai Eureka Lake. 

The Printing department has recently started 
work on Bulletin No. HI. Twenty-five thou- 
sand copies oi* this bulletin will be published. 

T. L. Ostium, '08, whi lias been suffering 
from an attack of appendicitis, is in the Park 
View hospital and recovering nicely from the 
operation. 

The annual report of the Kansas (las. Water 
and Kleetric Association contains a very valu- 
able article on the new Tantalum lamp, by 
Prof. B. P, Kyer. All engineering students 
should read the article. 



Head Askren's Christmas ad. on first page. 

By having school on Monday, a good many 
found it necessary to spend Sunday in the con- 
lines of their rooms, studying. 

K. C seems to he ah* lie ted with class mono- 
grams. We recommend about two doses of 

"Lewis' Cure-all." taken internally. 

Some of the farmers in hunting distance of 
Manhattan say they are going to have every- 
body "pulled" that they "ketch" hunting 
without a license. 

The hoard will be open for reserving season 
tickets for the lecture course, from 1 tub to 21:00 
o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, November 2u. 
at the Auditorium. 

The Experiment Station lias recently re- 
ceived a new Bullock, one-horse- power motor. 
(t will be used for running the Hour mill and 
the cereal grinders. 

The decorations on the excursion train, last 
Saturday, came up a minus quantity in the 
evening, but were found Sunday evening safely 
stowed away at the depot. 

J. B. Gano, of Medicine Lodge, Kan., was 
visiting Harry Porter last Wednesday. He 
was well pleased with tine College, and found it 

greater than bis expectations. 

"Little" Patee, '0T last year, was a K. S. A. 
C. rooter at the K. l\ game. Little is taking 
the medical course at Washhurn now. and 
was glad to see the boys again. 

The Hamilton society did not hold its meet- 
ing on the excursion. Saturday evening, as 
announced. Instead, the Hamilton members of 
the band rendered several selections. 

One of the K. 1 T . boys, who was showing a 
crowd of ."Farmers" through the dissecting 
room, told them that the ''specimens" were the 
remains of the last football team which had 
played there. 

Professor Potter addressed the I). S. Club of 
Manhattan last Thursday. His subject was: 
"The Cause and History of Disorders Among 
Students of Russia.'' Professor Valley sang 
a solo at the same meeting. 

The friends of Irma -Davies will be shocked 
to hear of the tragic death of her mother, by 
burning, last Saturday. The barn belonging 
to Mr. Da. vies burned last Saturday, and as 
Mrs. Davies did not appear on the scene, a 
search began, ending in the finding of the 
charred body of Mrs. Davies in the ruins of 
the barn. 

Ralph Parlette will be the next attraction on 
the College lecture course, appearing Kridav. 
December J. Parlette' s name is synonymous 
with a good time. A great success. Origin- 
ality. Effective fun. Cannot lie compared to 
any one who has been on the platform or is 
there now. His audiences pronounce him thor- 
oughly original in his mixture of fun and phil- 
osophy. Yet he does not pose as a "funny 
man." He writes and speaks in 'desperate 
earnest, but wit and humor beam from almost 
everything be says and does. Season tickets 
for the remaining seven numbers are now onlv 
$1.75. 



THE STUDENTS' HERAU). 



16-5 







* 

J 
i 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stw.k of Pall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 

every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



.Shoes repaired 
while you wait 



t 



(runs ami Ammunit ton. Frost & Davis. 

Read Askren's Christmas ad. on iirst page. 

The new horse stalls will he ready for use 
this week. 

Many Porter went to Kiowa. Kan., to spend 
Thanksgiving. 

The Engineering Association's bulletin 
hoard is very modest and retiring. 

Bee that Ever- Ready Safety Razor Seven 
Blades only $1.00. Front & Davis. 

The dairy "lah." hoys made cottage cheese 
last week/ ft is now on sale at ten cents per 
pound. 

Russel Porter, freshman last year, now at- 
tending K. l\. is home in Manhattan spend in jpf 
Thanksgiving. 

Jesse George remained over Sunday in Law- 
rence, and attended the regular monthly reaper 
service at K. P. 

A BBW Hereford heifer from the Stnnnard 
ranch, at Kmporia. has taken up her residence 
on the College farm. 

Assistant Melick is working on an extensive 
bacteriological analysis of all water used hy 
the dairy laboratory students. 

Assistants Wat kins and Shaw went hunting 
last Saturday. Ten squirrels and one coon fell 
victims to their prowess. They expect to have 
the coon skin made into ruga. 

W. J. Kerr, of Oklahoma City, is here tak- 
ing special work in the creamery. Fie was 
formerly in the creamery business at that 
place, hut will locate in Concordia. 

See that new Ever- Ready Safety Razor 
seven blades and honing attachment for only 
$1.00, Will shave any heard better, and no 
possible way of cutting the face. Frost ,V 
Davis. 

The Kansas Academy of Science will^ he 
held at Lawrence, Decern her 1 and 2. The 
sessions of the Academy will be held at 
the University. Asst. Theo. H. Schett'er will 
Stive an address on "Additions to the List of 
Kansas Arachnids.- and Asst. R. H. Shaw 
will <dve an address on "A Chemical Study ot 
the Lime-nnd-sulfur Dip." Professor Willard 
and Assistants Wood and Watkins will also 
attend. 



Alumni and former Students. 



Klniej" Samson, junior lasl uar, is visiting 
friends in Manhattan. 

(r. R. Davis, '65, U here to spend ;i fcW 

days with his miny friends. 

•I. .1. Biddison, 'n!. joined the K. I', ex- 
cursion at Topeka and rooted for hi* Alma 
Mater. . 

NelMs Baird, 'ur ( , came in from Marquette, 
Sunday, to attend ilr- festivities of Thanks- 
giving week. 

W. K. Kvans, '<>."». is Foreman of his father's 
ranch at Jennings, .lens Nygard. '65. is ai 
present his right-hand man. 

Wayne While. '(K>, i- Mill with the civil en- 
gineering department ot" the Santa Fe, with 
headquarters at Dodge City. 

Clara Pancake. 't\:\. assistant in domestic 
scienc. st »pp.;i a few days lasl w^j sk on her 
way from Topeka to her home in western Kan- 
sas. 

H. A. Hurt. Wi, is now in the employ of the 
, Western Klectric Company, at Kansas City. 
He fe* in the engineering department. Mis ad- 
dress is 2454 Tracy Avenue. 

Rett a Winner. '<M> Jessie Kit/., "el. Harvey 
Adams. '(),"). .I. A. Johnson, '<'."». Arthur Rhodes, 
'05, and T. IS, Dial. UH, were among the K. A. 
C. people who wer- hi Lawrenee for the game 
last Saturday. 

Helm Kernohnn. 't>4. left las; week lor <hil- 
occo. I. T.. where she has charge of tin- domes- 
tic science work in 1 he Chiloreo Indian School. 
Tins is one or the best of the government 
schools, the equipment in the domestic science 
department being almost equal to bur own. 

Among alumni who attended the recent insti- 
tutes on the Hock island I rain were: C.K. Wag 
ner, '!>!>. at Knterprisr: V. L. Cory, '04, MePher- 
son: Kelton brothers. 'i>4. Groveiand: Hope 
Brady, 'lis. Dr. H. T. Nichols, *!(!). and Harrieit 
(Nichols. Donohoo, "w. al Libera;!; c, D. Mc- 
Ca-ulev. '88, Fowler: Wayne While. 'al. Dodge 
City; *S. S. Fay, '05. White City; L. •'• Man- 
ger, "tt"i. Clvde: II. W. Avery. 'HI. Clay Center: 
Sarah Da vies. 'i>2. I Jala: K. L. Cottrell. '!>U. 
,1. c. Bolton. '!«'. Wabaunsee? J. -1. Biddison, 



166 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The College Grocery and Meat Market. 



I 



Dealer In 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fresh and Cured Meats, 

Fruits and Candles 






1116 MoroSt. 
Phone 227 



JOHN F. HARRISON 



We deliver 
goods promptly 



iymww »p»»»»>»ww»w»»ww w» M »» w »w www» >w w»»»»w wwn 



'04, Topeka; E. W. Reid, '92, and J. A. Rokes, 
'93, Holton; P. K. Syrans, '01, Bendena; Clara 
Goodrich, '03, Mankato; P. W. Boyd and Ma- 
mie (Alexander) Boyd, '02, and M. C. Adams, 
'00, Phillipsburjr; W. K. Evans, '05, and Jens 
Nygard, '05, Jennings. 

Mamie Hassebroek, '04, left last week for 
Toledo, Iowa, to take charge of her work as 
assistant matron in the Sac and Fox Indian 
School at that place, ('lara Barnhisel, '04, 
has just been transferred from this school to 
Genoa, Neb., as teacher in the Indian school 
there. J. F. Ross, '02, is teacher of agricul- 
ture at the same school. 

F. W. Haselwood, '01, is in Midway, Cal., 
and in order to keep in touch with affairs of 
K. S. A.-C. has ordered the Herald another 
year. He took in the great football game be- 
tween California and Leland Stanford Uni- 
versities, and says the game was "great," 
especially for those from Leland Stanford, 
because the score was 15 to 12 in their favor, 
when they were expecting a big defeat. 

Extract from a letter from L- V. Sanford, 
'04, of Oneida, Kan.: "How is everything 
about College these days? If everything else 
is flourishing as football seems to he, I guess 
K. S. A. C. is maintaining her lead among the 
schools of the State, and I truly hope it is. It 
gives me pleasure to be able to report a pros- 
perous year for the farmers of this locality. 
Small grain of all kinds was good, both as to 
yield and quality. Our wheat made twenty 

fWt acre, oats fifty -five, and corn, which we are 
making now, will run in the neighborhood of 
sixty bushels. With these yields and present 
prices the farmer has little reason for complaint 
this year. I note with pleasure that K. S. A. 
C. is* planning to make a showing at Chicago 
this year, not only in the grain- and stock- judg- 
ing contests, but also in the live-stock depart- 
ment. If you go there this fall, remember my 
'old lady, E. C. Gardner, '04, is there at the 
stock yards with the cattle- buying department 
of Swift & Company, and his street address is 
4304 Emerald Avenue. 



Read Askren's Christmas ad. on first page. 

The Kansas Farmer copied Mr. Melick's 
dairy article in full last week. 

Miss Viola Hudson and Mr. Q. A. Circle 
were married Wednesday evening, at Vinton, 
La. Both were students here last year. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

, - MANUFACTURERS OF ^ 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills. Disc Cultivators, 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves. Sash 
Weights, Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone <». 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



PROFESSION A L. 



DK. 0. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



Dr. M. J. McKEE, DENTIST. 



Work guaranteed. Office in Huntress Building. 327Povntz. 
Over the Star Grocery. Phones: Office 66: Res, 83. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave HQ 

1 )rs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. Office Phone 30T 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



167 



17 



H 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



i 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



A±. 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of 




Ice C 



ream 



OysTers 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



¥T 



I 



Fi * Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
ouniain. — _____ ICE CREAM sodas 



L- 



• OMBB4 



J 



r 



Students' 



Headquarters for College Supplies 

Come in and see our eight-dozen assortment of Waterman's Ideal and 
Parker's Lucky Curve Fountains. Prices, $1.00 and upward. 



"1 



Co-operative 



L 



Special orders Receive our prompt attention 

Chas. S. Jones, 



Manage 



r Bookstore 



J 




^^~^mm. 



168 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



. * . » . * . » . * - 



Students* Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 

H. H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

227 Poyntt A venue 




Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Special Rates to Student*. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE & BELL, Props. 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent, 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 

C UUIA C THAT 
OljSZLJO GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo- T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



Kings 



Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Home/made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



e-^- 






SHOES 

Of Style 
& Service 



CLOTHES THAT SUIT 

THE PEOPLE 



HATS AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
Reliable Goods. Prices that will Please You 



Roberts & Ottowa ciotfe 



t 



._ 



150,000 Dairy Farmers are Going to be Added to the Big Army of More 

Than Six-hundred Thousand Users of 

U6 LciVcil Cr - m Separators 



During the Year 1905 



The all-important profit-earning, time-saving need of the Cream Sepa- 
rator is now universally recognized by every one. As between different 
separators the De Laval is the original, and has for twenty-five years 
led in centrifugal separation. Would-be imitating machines simply util- 
ize the construction which expired De Laval patents leave free to them. 
New patents still protect modern improvements. The St. Louis Exposi- 
tion gave the Grand Prize (very highest award) to the De Laval Sepa- 
rators and three Grand and Gold Medal Prizes to its inventors and im- 
provers, while the Grand Prize and Gold Medal butter exhibits were 
all De Laval made. 



A Catalogue and Any Desired Particulars are to be had for the Asking 

The De Laval Separator Company 



Randolph and Canal Sts„ Chicago 



New York 




I THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

= john nrnrn i 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 



IB 327 POYNTZ AVE. 
Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly 
to Any Part of the City .... 



■*•■■** ■ m ^ — ^ . . j « — ^ — > ._ . .^ _^_^j — 1_ __^_i_r"i_ 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections... 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 



mm 



rrr^=sssammmWmmmmmmmmm 



m 



w 












5 
* 



i 

1 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. a a *v *\ 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



We have been busy changing our store so as to handle our Big Holi- 
day Trade more conveniently, and repainting and papering 
so as to display to the best advantage the 

Best Lot of Holiday Goods 



i 

1 

I 

X 

% 

* 

** 

i 



i 



-w 



HKiZE VBT HHO- 



* 
* 
* 

* 



We have received a Large Line of Fancy Work, both finished articles and 

goods to be made up, and 

Now is the Time to Get these Goods 

while there is plenty of time to make them up. We also have displayed a 
Large Factory Line of Fancy Box Papers and Cloth Weave Paper and Envel- 
opes In bulk, which we are selling at popular prices. 




THE BIG RACKET 



I 
i 

* 
* 
* 
* 



\ 









I IWie Students' Herald | 

! i 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





i 



I 



!■ ■( 



V * 






Keuffel & 

# OF N 

813 Locust Street, 



YORK * 

Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraxon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS ( co A L l o L RS ). 

50O-PAGE CATALOGUE ON AMPLICATION 



— 



. 



Headquarters 

For Christmas Gifts 

STUDENT FRIENDS 



Christmas is not far off and 
It is probable that you have 
a father, mother or some 
friend whom you are going 
to make a gift. Our Big 
Jewelry Sale begins De- 
cember 1st. We offer at this 
sale one of the largest stocks 
of WATCHES, JEWELRY 
of all kinds, Silverware, Cut 
Glass and Hand-painted 
China at big reduced prices. 
We would be glad to show 
every student our line. 



ASKREN, 



The jeweler 

and 

Optician 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X> 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate. X 



I 



Phone 



226 



v 



. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



169 



LAST CALL FOR 

CHRISTMAS 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



Don't conic in a day or two 
before yon want them and 
then he disappointed we are 
not making tintypes. 



Wolf's - Studio 

Opposite Library 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 
ISO to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. ' En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati. ()., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta. 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis,, Texarkana. Tex., 
Kan Francisco, ('ah 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 



F. B. ELLIOTT 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 



PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildinsr. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine llneclgtrsand toilet articles 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz p, C HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS GO T0 

2 ID Poyntz Ave., Manhattan, Kan. 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS. We 
offer you only the best. JV JV 

W. M. STINGLEY & CO. 



170 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADK WITH 



M 



vdtoua&. 



DEALE 



DryGoods Room. 

Wool Poplins, Mohairs, 
Cravenette, Grnnite Cloth, 
Alhatros, Henrietta, Serge, 
Wool Fascinators, Lace 
Collars, Kid Gloves, Mit- 
tens, etc. 



Rcady^to^Wcar Room. 

We are showing 1 a very 

good quality in Silk Pet- 
ticoats with prices rang- 
ing from $5.50 to $10. 



Ladies' Fleecy-lined 
Wrappers, Muslin Under- 
wear, Corset Covers, etc. 



Shoe Department. 

Rice & Hutchins EDU- 
CATOR— Shoes for chil- 
dren. Krippendorf-Ditt- 
mann — Shoes for Misses 
and Ladies. 

Hardware Department. 

Keen K utter Goods a 



specialty. Wilson Im- 
proved Air-tight Heating 
Stoves (wood burners), 
the stove that gives out 
more heat than any stove 
we ever saw, for the 
amount of fuel burned. 



Groceries. 

We believe you want 
good, reliable goods. We 
sell the kind that will 
give you satisfaction. 
Lamps, Queens ware, etc. 
East side of Grocery room. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for C ; roc erics , Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Good h, Ready -to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



The 

Leader 



To buy Christmas 
presents, because we 
have just received a 
large shipment of 
goods from 
SANTA CLAUS 



Moore Bros. & Co. 



Christmas comes only once a year; let every- 
body both far and near 
come to 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

y MANUFACTURERS OF fc 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators, 
Safety Corn Harvesters. I,ittle Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings, Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights, Chimney Caps, Structural Iron Work, 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone 6. 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEAtER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



PltOFESSWNA L. 
DK. O. A. GUISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms I and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Pine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg., Downstairs. Office Phone 307 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The: 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorlietBveiyCtoeGultivateHis Own Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., December 7, 1905. 



Number 13 



State Norma! Defeated. 

Notwithstanding the cold weather, a large 
crowd was at Athletic park last Thursday to 
see our farmer hoys win the last foothall game 
of the season" from the State Normal, hy a 
score of \i) to 0. Both rooters' clubs were out 
in full force and they marked the end of the 
season by a grand display of enthusiasm. The 
hand was out and played a number of selections. 
Including the College song. Few people realize 
how hard it is for the hand to get out and play 
on such a day as last Thursday. The leader 
and the members of the hand deserve great 
credit for their excellent support given the 
team at the games this fall. 

The contest last Thursday was not as good 
as some of the games seen here this season, 
but it was interesting, and it clearly showed 
that ours was the better team. " Mike's" 
boys were stronger on both offense and de- 
fense than the visitors, and the ball was never 
closer to our goal than the eighteen-yard line. 
In the 1 second half the visitors strengthened 
on offense and for a time it looked as though 
they would score, but they lost t>n a fumble 
and their chance was gone. The play during 
the first half was almost entirely in Normal 
territory. Only three times were our boys 
downed in their own territory and not once did 
the Normal carry the ball across the center of 
the field. In the second half, the game was 
played largely near the center of the field. 
During the game the College advanced the ball 
a total of one hundred ninety -four yards while 
the Normal carried it forward only ninety-four 
yards. 

The teams were about evenly matched as to 
weight. The visitors were able to gain only 
through their tackles. Captain Gist was good 
in opening holes, and Hargis and Forde made 
several good gains through there. They tried 



several fakes, but lost on every one of them. 
Their cross-tackle bucks were good, and on 
them most of their yains were made. 

The College players gained not only through 
the line, but also made a number of wide end 
runs. Montgomery was called on to carry the 
ball a numl»er of times and was always good 
for a gain. Cooley and Blake would open up 
a hole, and Joe would wade through the 
teachers for several yards. 

Cooley seemed to have things his own way 
on the right side of the line, for he broke 
through and downed the runner several times. 
Blake played the same steady game at end that 
he has played for the last month. He got down 
fast on punts, broke up the interference as soon 
as it formed and made a nice gain of ten yards 
in the first half. Wilher, Ostlund and Hagg- 
man all played good games at guard. All 
three will be with us next year and there will 
be a hard fight for a position. Whipple at 
center played a faultless game. His passes 
were good and he held his man easily. 

Lindsey played a good game at left end. He 
made several good tackles and got down the 
field well on punts. Captain Scholz, at full, 
did all the scoring for our team. His field 
goal was a dandy and it was hard to kick. 
His punting was the best of the season. Three 
times he punted, the hall going forty-three, 
fifty and thirty-seven yards, the last one going 
over the goal line. Mallon at left half played 
a brilliant game. He put up good interference, 
made good gains in carrying the hall and was 
sure at tackling. Nystrom at right half 
carried the ball for gains of ninety-five yards. 
He also played a good game on defense and 
once downed Forde after the latter had run 
thirty yards and had a clear field. 

Kirk at quarter and later at left half was 
always to he depended upon. The game of last 



172 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Thursday was probably Kirk's last game for 
the College, and we ha,ve just found out what 
we will miss when he graduates. Kirk is prob- 
ably the best man we had to do all-around 
work. He has played at quarter, half and 
full, and has made go^d at each place. 

Cunningham at quarter did niee work. He 
handled the ball well and sent his plays where 



punted to the forty -yard line, The College 
failed to make the required distance, so the 
Normal again took the ball. They made first 
down once and then, after losing five yards for 
being off-side, they again punted. Mallon was 
downed on our twenty-three-yard line. On the 
first play, Montgomery and Lindsey opened up 
a hole and Nystrom went through for thirty 




EXPLANATIONS 
0ALL CA*#teo 



innmu tintypes* ALT* 

gains could be made. To Sol is due lots of the 
credit for the place kick in the second half. 
Had the ball not been well placed the goal 
would have been missed. 

FIRST HALF. 

Captain Scholz kicked off forty yards and 
the Normal returned twelve. They made five 
yards in three attempts to advance the ball, 
but failed to gain another five, so Gough 
punted forty-three yards to Mallon, who re- 
turned eighteen. The Normal lost five yards 
for being off-side. Montgomery, Nystrom and 
Mallon took turn about in carrying the ball, 
and in five plays they advanced the ball to the 
teacher's fifteen -yard line. The visitors de- 
fense strengthened and they took the ball on 
downs. On the first play they were carried 
back to their five-yard line and from there they 



yK.A.Z.CQ*ttf 



yards. Then Scholz. Nystrom, Mallon and 
Montgomery carried the ball for gains of from 
four to twenty -five yards and marched straight 
down the field for a touchdown, which was 
made by Scholz. He kicked goal, making the 
score 6 to 0. Time, twenty minutes. 

The remainder of the half was played en- 
tirely in Normal territory and but few gains 
were made. Scholz punted over the goal line 
once and Gough kicked out from the twenty - 
five-yard line. The half ended with the ball in 
possession of the College, on Emporia's forty - 
yard line. 

SECOND HALF. 

The Normal kicked off thirty yards to 
Cooley, who returned eleven yards. The Col- 
lege failed to make its gain, so Scholz 
punted. The ball changed hands a couple of 



THE STUDENTS 1 HERALD. 



173 



times, and then the Normal started down the 
field on a run. Forde made thirty yards 
through end and tackle, and Hargis made 
seventeen through guard. The visitors had 
the ball on our eighteen -yard line, but lost it 
on a fumble in the next play. The College 
also fumbled, but held the Normal for downs. 
Then Nystrom and Mallon advanced the ball 
to the center of the field and Scholz punted. 
Blake and Lindsey downed their man as soon 
as he caught the ball and the line stopped their 
rushes with no gain. Our boys took the ball 
on downs, and Nystrom tore off eighteen yards 
on the first attempt. Kirk and Scholz carried 
the ball to the ten-yard line. The ball was 
near the edge of the field, but the Normal line 
was strong, so Cunningham called for a place 
kick and Scholz sent the ball over the cross- 
bar. Score 10 to 0. Time, eighteen minutes. 
The game ended soon after, with the ball in 
possession of the teachers on their own thirty - 
five-yard line. They had lost ten yards on a 
couple of fakes, but recovered the lost ground 
on a blocked punt, which was picked up by 
Hargis. 

K.S.N. K. S. A. C. 

Waldorf C Whipple 

Honska B.G Hajrirman 

Haitrier l*G Wilber. Ostlund 

UfstlCapt.) R.T Cooley 

Forde L.T Montgomery 

Hensley R.E Blake 

Wells L. E Lindsey 

Bright Q Kirk, Cunnimrham 

Hands R.H Nystrom 

Sterna L. H Mallon. Kirk 

Uoutrh P ( Capt.) Scholz 

Officials: Odell and Eberhardt. 

Junior Taffy Pull. 

About forty happy, taffy-hungry juniors met 
at the home of Mary Kimball for a good, old- 
fashioned taffy pull last Saturday evening. 
The varied experiences of the "second relief" 
with runaways, broken wagon tongues, etc., 
need not be recounted here. As it was, they 
got there, which in this case amply justified 
the means. 

After some light scrimmage work, we finally 
got the pot to boiling. Somehow, the oxygen 
in the syrup kept up a continual spluttering 
and it required, by actual count, four spoons 
and five juniors to keep it in subjection. This 
did not include Helen 1 s motherly advice. 
However, " Labor conquers all things," and 
we rejoiced exceedingly when it finally 
"taffied" in fine shape. 

Now the real hard line bucking began. 
Mallon, Walker, and Nystrom all fumbled 
repeatedly, hunting for anti sticking materials. 
As a matter of fact, the taffy seemed more 
attached to us than we were to it. Greasy cuffs 
and sleeves testified to our brilliant work. 
But again the juniors were victorious, and it 



was a fine lot of taffy when it had finally re- 
ceived its proper training. It disappeared, 
however, in a surprisingly short time, this 
making our fourth victory for the evening. 

At a late hour we started homeward, all 
feeling that Miss Kimball's method of enter- 
taining was of the first class. h, M. J. 



Second Team Won. • 

The College second team went to Emporia' 
last Thursday to play the annual Thanksgiving 
game with the Normal second team. Judging 
from the score, which was 38 to in favor of 
the College, the game must have been rather 
one-sided. The game was played almost en- 
tirely in Normal territory, and only a few 
times did the teachers make their five yards. 

Our boys received the kick-off and in a few 
minutes carried the ball within six inches of 
the goal line. The teachers braced and held 
twice, and secured the ball on downs. Once a 
Normal man got away on a fake and made 
thirty-five yards, but at no time was the Col- 
lege goal in danger. At the end of the first 
half the score stood 15 to 0. 

Touchdowns were made by Oskin, Johnson, 
Milligan, Curtis, Carlson, and two by Christian. 
Milligan kicked three goals. 

Lecture Number Three. 

In spite of the fact that a large number of 
the students were away on vacation, a good- 
sized audience listened to Ralph Parlette's 
lecture on "Hard Knocks." 

Just before the lecture commenced we were 
agreeably awakened from our semi-sleepy 
condition by a very fine solo by Mr. Beeman, 
assisted by Miss Lane and Miss Thompson. 

The speaker placed himself on a friendly foot- 
ing with us from the start and held our undi- 
vided attention until the very last moment. The 
lecture contained enough wit and humor to 
season it well, and still not so much as to make 
the "soup" too spicy.' There were indeed many 
fine thoughts scattered throughout his entire 
discourse, and they were so presented as to be 
readily appreciated by all. The part of his 
lecture which struck us as the cream was the 
description of the climb on Mt. Lowe. Among 
other good things he said : "Asa city dwindles 
into a speck when viewed from a mountain, so 
our seemingly great deeds dwindle into nothing 
when viewed in God's perspective." 

Mr. Parlette's "soup" was not nearly so 
thin as he said it would be, and his variety of 
knocks were as interesting as his pose on the 
stage. His ability to hold the audience was 
certainly wonderful, and it is hoped that we 
may again have the pleasure of hearing him on 
our course. i- M. J. 



174 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




0W« Cl»TrV*TE Mi» 

Own Oeniu •+• 

r Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as seeonil- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. __ 



F. A. Kiknk. JR..OB Editor-in-chief 

H. R. Hkim. '00 Business Manager 

EL 0. Fakkak. '07 , literary Editor 

(•). C. Kahl. W .Local Editor 

MattikPittman. "06 Exchange Editor 

Oarkoi, Walker. '07. Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery, *07 Subscription Manager 

MMnlaSTw f ■ Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 Alumni Editor 

J. R. Coxen. OS Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late J 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet, '04. alumni editor, will be glad lo re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Dec. 7, 1905. 




ommiAi 





Stockholders of the Herald are requested to 
remember the meeting to-morrow afternoon, 
and also to be present at the same. 



Our attention has been called to the fact that 
the ladies of our Faculty are practically un- 
known to the students of the College. We are 
aware that home duties come first, that they 
are many and diverse, but we should like to 
see our professors' wives more often about 
College and in attendance at chapel exercises. 



It is the general opinion among the rooters, 
as evidenced by a unanimous vote, that our 
football boys should be rewarded with sweaters. 
The expense, though small, is yet expense and 
will make its showing on each individual bal- 
ance sheet. But we think the matter one de- 
serving of sacrifice of time, money and atten- 
tion, for not only will the sweaters be treasured 
by the recipients, but they will be the cause of 
drawing all eyes to our association and of 
spreading its fame far and wide. This is to be 



our final effort as a club this fall, and each 
and every one of us should enter into it with 
most hearty good will. 



Thanksgiving has marked the close of the 
football season and the opening of that of 
basket-ball. Last year's experience proved 
conclusively that basket-ball is a sport de- 
signed to become popular at K. S. A. C, when- 
ever adequate facilities for practicing and 
playing can be secured. It may never come 
into favor to the degree in which baseball and 
football are held, but it is recognized as one 
of the leading college sports, and as an exer- 
cise most beneficial to the player. It has been 
found that the expense of playing the game is 
small as compared with the average receipts, 
and so there will be no financial difficulty con- 
nected with the sport as played here. It only 
remains to develop a good team and to secure 
a schedule of first class games. Inter-class 
games are one of the means of developing 
players and also interest in the game. When 
the game has stirred up class enthusiasm and 
established teams representing classes, it will' 
not be difficult for it to bring out college en- 
thusiasm and to make itself one of our repre- 
sentative college sports. 



Bad Habits of the Country. 

The grasshopper chews tobacco. 

The quail gets out his pipe 
The ttsh-hiiwk is so awful poor 

He has to hunt a " snipe." 

The rooster has his cocktail 

The orchard gets plum full. 
The onion squanders every scent 

And the radish has a pull. 

—Sfif&m ./ontnof. 

Football Banquet and Reception. 

The Athletic Association gave a banquet, 
last Thursday evening, in D. S. Hall, to the 
members of the K. S. A. C. and the K. S. N. 
football teams. A few invited guests were also 
present. The banquet, which was served by a 
number of the junior and senior girls, was fine, 
and every one present enjoyed it. Plates were 
laid for fifty guests, and those present did 
justice to the feast. After the banquet the 
players went to the gymnasium, where a re- 
ception was given by the two Hooters' Clubs. 
The drill room was decorated with pennants 
and with the Normal and the College colors. 
Speeches were made by Professor Rhodes, of 
the Normal, and by Professor Hamilton, 
Professor Willard and President Nichols. 
Each of the College players said a few words 
in regard to the season's work, and then re- 
freshments of cider and doughnuts were passed. 



Some people are always anxious to lend a 
helping hand. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



1 1fR 




"I lomr to be an unnel," 

A f reshm era boy once sighed : 
He lined up imfnst the llrst team — 
His wish was irratllied.— fCx. 

No man is greater than his ideals. 

A notorious eavesdropper" rain. Ex. 

The best is always good till there comes a 
better.— //ow<. 

Every one can master a grief hut he that hath 
it. — Shakespeare. 

Total receipts for the Chicago- Wisconsin 
football game were $12,H(}2. 

The student body of Wisconsin University 
will be taxed one dollar for athletics. 

"Pat, do you believe in fate?" "Shure, an" 
phwat would we be sthanding on without them." 
— Ex, 

We always laiwh at teachers jokes. 

No matter what they be. 
Not because they're funny jokes. 

But because it's policy.— E.r. 

The seniors of Indiana University have 
adopted a sombrero hat with a tan-colored 
band as characteristic of seniordom. 

There were exciting times at Colorado Uni- 
versity recently when the buildings were threat- 
ened by a grass fire. Volunteer students 
fought fire for over four hours. 

Delay and half-hearted pus lung depreciates 
the value of the work in hand, and kills the 
spirit of interest and life, and causes disloyalty 
and a negative sentiment to grow.— Ex. 

The honor system is now in vogue at Am- 
herst College. Any freshman caught cheating 
is to be suspended for a term, but any member 
from the upper three classes is to be expelled. 

Mother (after telling her son the second time 
to get coal).— "Willie, what did I tell you to 
doV" Willie.— "Now isn't it strange, mamma, 
that we both forget it? I'm sure I can *t recall 
it."— Ex. 

Teacher.— '* Now, Tommy, if your father had 
twenty dozen eggs in his store and found that 
eighteen of them were bad, how many would he 
lose!" Tommy.— "None. I guess you don't 
know my pa."'— Ex. 

In keeping with this age of painless surgery 
and painless dentistry will be the painless 
football they are advocating now. Ueid, head 
coach at Harvard, has openly sided with Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and President Elliot. 



The Carlisle- Indians have been successful in 
securing a number of good football men, by 
canvassing of the Indian reservations last sum- 
mer. This is only another instance of them 
following in the ways of the white men. 

A formal offer has been made to the authori- 
ties of Smith college of $1,000,0110 endowment, 
a site of eighty acres and other privileges not 
obtained here if the institution will move to 
.lol iet. 111. The acceptance or refusal must he 
made this year. Ex. 

Thirty-tWO students of Nevada University 
have been arrested and are to 1*8 tried for 
hazing. The warrants were obtained by the 
father of the freshman who was ducked because 
he would not join in the college yells. The 
father demands satisfaction. 

Debating at Pennsylvania is becoming more 
popular. It is expected that at least 100 men 
will enter the preliminary debate this year. 
A strong movement is on foot to have all men 
who make an intercollegiate debating team 
awarded a varsity "P." — Ex, 

The Forum is a new debating club at Har- 
vard, organized as a training school for the 
University Debating Club, which is now run 
on a competitive-merit basis. The object of the 
new club is to give aH those who are interested 
in debating a chance to appear in public. 

The organization of girls' rooters' clubs 
throughout the Western institutions has heen 
the cause of considerable comment in the Rust. 
Syracuse is at present debating the advisabil- 
ity a id propriety of establishing one there. 
They admit the need, hut question whether it is 
the right way for the girls to show their college 
spirit. 

Some day we shall realize that the game of 
life is more than a game of football. We have 
every -day work more intricate than pitching 
curves, more strenuous than punting the hall. 
We must hold ourselves in repair. We must 
remember the training rules. When this is 
done, we shall win not only games and races, 
but the great prizes of life.- David Starr Jor- 
dan. 

During the last football season the Yale 
eleven had six westeners. Harvard had four, 
Princeton had three, and Pennsylvania three. 
Twenty-seven per cent of Yale's student body 
are westerners. Yet this twenty-seven percent 
furnishes forty-six per cent of the athletes. 
There are .770 westerners among the 4.328 men 
at Harvard, or thirteen per cent, and the west- 
erners furnish seventeen per cent of athletes. 
Either the westerners have the better of the 
easterners as to muscle and nerve, or they 
know better how to use them. Ex. 



i. 



170 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



j 





FOSfilJ 



Percy Lill enjoyed a visit from his mother 
last week. 

Miss Katherine Ward sang 1 in eh ape! , No- 
vember 20. 

Several of the students spent a few days last 
week on the ice. 

(Sinter Hull, 'OH, enjoyed a visit from his 
father last week. 

Professor Erf is away on th? sp-cial train in 
southern Kansas. 

It. H. Cowen was visiting his son, N. L. 
Co wen, last week. 

Ed Munsel, freshman last year, spsnt Thanks- 
giving in Manhattan. 

Lloyd Ferguson visited home folks in Mis- 
souri during the holidays. 

Grover Kahl enjoyed a visit, Thursday, from 
his old chum, Albert Coffin. 

LOST.— A Tan Omega Sigma pin. Finder 
please return to E. N. Itodell. It 

The steel work for the roof of the boiler- 
room was put in place Monday. 

M i s s El la Smith of C lay Ce nter , s pent a f e w 
days last week with Miss Petty. 

Captain Shaffer spent Thanksgiving with 
his mother, at Centerville, Iowa. 

See our large assortment of new K. S, A. C. 
fobs. Just arrived, at Askren's. 

Walter Kdmundson, sophomore last year, 
was in Manhattan over Thanksgiving. 

A new pump was placed in the pump pit 
Sunday, while the boilers were not being fired. 

E. L. Knostman presented the Rooters' club 
with a large K. S. A. C. pennant, last Thurs- 
day. 

Mr. O. O. Morrison enjoyed a short visit 
from his cousin, W. O. Steen, of Hope, last 
week. 

Miss Mattie Pittman, 'CMS. was called home 
home last week on account of the death of her 
father. 

Guy Crise. sophomore last year, now attend- 
ing St. Mary's college, is home having his eyes 
treated. 

The Jayhuirker en" me out the first of the week, 
and appeared to be just a little beyond the 
Jayh( ticker.* of the past. 

Edward Manning, one of Nebraska's 
sprinters, visited relatives on College Hill, 
Sunday and Monday. He is a grandson of 
former Prssident Dennison. 



See our large assortment of new K. S. A. C. 
fobs. Just arrived, at Askren's. 

Myron E. Doom, first year in '04, visited old 
College friends Friday and Saturday. He is 
now a "school ma'am'' in Ottawa county. 

Quarterback Bright, of the K. S. N. team, 
would like to kidnap one of the girls who 
helped in the entertainment last Thursday even- 
ing. 

The University of Chicago claims the foot- 
ball championship of the West. They won 
from Michigan on Thanksgiving bv a score of 
2 to 0. 

The Juylmwker should publish a list of the 
people who " cannot live without the Jayhatrker' 1 ' 
and not take up valuable space in the alumni 
column. 

Each meml>er of the Normal foot hall team 
was given a small pennant with the College 
monogram upon it, at the reception, Thursday 
evening. 

The senior football team was defeated at 
('lay ('enter, Thanksgiving afternoon, by a 
picked team of high-school hoys and semi-pro- 
fessionals. The score was 5 to 0. 

Walter Gish, first year, died Monday, No- 
vember 27, of typhoid fever. He was buried 
the following Wednesday. Seven of the family 
have or have had the same disease this fall. 

The College power house is using between 
twenty and twenty-five tons of coal per day 
now, and when the extremely cold weather sets 
in, about thirty -five tons per day will be con- 
sumed. 

Freshy.— -"Oh, my! Where did you get that 
fine box of stationery V Soph. — "At the Co- 
op, bookstore, of course. Didn't you know 
that is the place where all students buy their 
College supplies ?" 

The "Sophs " have finally decided that 
their class colors shall be "Alice Blue and 
White.'' "Alice Blue" is the latest manu- 
factured color, and dates its first appearance 
from the "Reign of Gaston." 

Roland McKee, who is assisting in horticul- 
ture at the College, will leave soon for Mary- 
land, where he will take up the position of 
assistant professor of horticulture in the 
Maryland Agricultural College. 

One of the students in English recently wrote 
a theme on the festive "chinch-bug.'' He was 
severely criticised by the instructor, who 
thought that a chinch-bug- was a bedbug, and 
should not be mentioned in polite society. 

The Elliot Clothing Company presented the 
football boys. Coaches Ahearn and Melick, 
and manager R. A. Cassell, with beautiful 
pennants, last week. The pennants are cer- 
tainly "nifty,'* and the boys greatly appreciate 
the kindness of the Elliots. 

Supt. and Mrs. J. Lund gave a very pleas- 
ant party at their ho7ne, November 27. The 
event was a surprise birthday party given in 
honor of Ruth and Frances Taylor, nieces of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lund. An elegant supper was 
served and everybody had a good time, as they 
always do at Jake Lund's home. 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



r^" 



177 



4 * Shake the barrel ! ' '-- Parktte. 

Skates sharpened. Frost & Davis 

Herald election to-morrow afternoon. 

Read Askren's Christinas ad. on first page. 

Gen nine Barney & Berry skates. Frost & 
Davis. 

Captain Shaffer visited at home during the 
holidays. 

Miss Margaret Cunningham was sick a few 
days last week. 

Mrs. O. H. Hal stead is visiting her mother 
in St. Joseph, Mo. 

''Nat'' Coodwin, post-graduate, went to De- 
troit last Saturday. 

Miss Jennie Tliayer went to Topeka, Friday, 
returning Monday evening. 

Miss Daisy Zeininger visited friends in 
Wichita- during' the holidays. 

Miss Hulda Ise, of Wetmore, spent Thanks- 
giving' vacation in Manhattan. 

See our large assortment, of new K. S, A. C. 
fobs. Just arrived, at Askren's. 

James Morrison, sophomore last year, spent 
Thanksgiving with Horace CI rich. 

George Berenzen, of Kansas City. Mo., was 
visiting friends in Manhattan last week. 

Josie Holland and Minnie Connor vis*ited 
friends on College Hill, Sunday afternoon. 

"Don't forget the Herald election tomorrow 
aft*rnoon. All stockholders should he present. 

The machinery in Dairy Hall was rearranged 
Monday. It will he more sanitary than for- 
merly. 

See that ever-ready safety razor - seven 
blades and honing attachment for $1.00. Frost 
& Davis. 

The new addition to the boiler-room is fast 
Hearing completion. The roof will be put on 
this week. 

The Chemistry Department received a large 
consignment of chemicals from Germany last 
Saturday. 

Miss Pearl Akin, '05. did good work at Em- 
poria last Thursday in rooting for the K. S. 
A. C. team. 

Professor Avery, of the chemistry depart- 
ment. University of Nebraska, will visit Col- 
lege, Saturday. 

Assistants Shaw and Watkins painted Kan- 
sas City red last Saturday. Both were able to 
be at College. Monday. 

A sheep-feeding experiment will be started 
by the Animal Husbandry Department as soon 
as the sheep can be purchased. 

Gertrude Hole was chief cook and bottle- 
washer at the Experiment Station during the 
absence of R. H. Shaw last week. 

A former K. V. coach says that Chancellor 
Strong has been talking about him, and he 
thinks the court of Douglas county should 
award him 130,000 to relieve his feelings. 



See our large assortment of new K. S. A. C. 
fobs. Just arrived, at Askren's. 

Howard Rash ton, a brother- in-law of Pro- 
fessor Cortelyou, is visiting here tin's we^k. 
His home is in Fairmount, Nob. 

By a new ruling of the Faculty, all absence 
excuses must be turned in to the Secretary, 
whether the absence is excused or not. 

Dr, M. J. McKee, dentist. Work guaran- 
teed. Office in Huntress building, 327 Poyntz 
avenue, over Star Grocery. Hi one <»(i. 

The Animal Husbandry Department has 
placed the ribbons it has won this year in 
a large frame. The display is worth seeing. 

Say, why don't you buy a box of stationery 
for your friends as a Christmas present? The 
Co-op. bookstore can suit you in both quality 
and price. 

Torje Carlson ran fifteen yards in the Nor- 
mal second-team game, with a teacher on each 
shoulder. It seemed to please him more than 
the teachers. 

The Animal Husbandry Department received 
a fine Jersey bull from the Nebraska Kx peri- 
men t Station last week. He answers to the 
name of Grit. 

Our subscription manager is sending out per- 
sonal letters to delinquent subscribers. Give 
his message prompt attention, or you will stop 
reading the Herald. 

The Department of Physics and Electrical 
Engineering has just received from the Win. 
Cruokcs laboratory a spirit ha ri scope. This is 
an apparatus containing :i particle of radium, 
suspended over a screen, that hecomes bril- 
liantly luminescent when bombarded by the 
emanations from the radium. 

Football summary for 1905: 

Ottawa 

Washburn.... 12 

St. Marys. 5 

Fairmount fi 

Haskell (2d team)... 

Normal 

Weslevan 

K. T 28 

Normal ( 2d team ). . . 



K. S. A. C 


.....29 


K. S. 4.C 


. . . . . s 


K. S. A. C 


10 


K. S. A. C 


n 


K. S. A. C 


<ilt 


K. S. A.C ..... 


10 


K. S. A.C 


24 


K. 8. A.C 






K. S. A.C.{2dteam).:W 



The College teams scored 187 points against 
51 for opponents, a record far better than that 
of any previous football team at K. S. A. C. 

Class Resolutions. 

Whereas, Death has entered the home of 
our friend and former classmate, and 

Whereas. We, the class of '(Mi. desire, in 
some public manner, to express our heartfelt 
sympathy, be it 

Rexolred, That we sincerely condole with 
Miss Dickie Davies in her great sorrow, and 
hope that her grief may be somewhat alleviated 
by the sympathy of her friends. Be it further 
" Resolred. That a copy of these resolutions be 
printed in the Students' Herald and in the 
home paper. Kate Alexander. 

C. W. McCamphell, 
Emily Smith. 

( 'nmmittte. 



17H 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 






i 



Students, We Invite You to Inspect 

Our Big Stock of Fall and Winter Suits, Overcoats, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, Etc. We aim to make our store in 
every way the very best Clothes Store in Manhattan. 



Tailor at 
your service 



JOHN COONS of course 



Shoes repaired 
while you wait 



5 

t 

i 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Alice Loom is, "04, spent Thanksgiving at her 
home in Crete, Neh. 

Roe Trohert and Carl Me Keen were anion g 
the visitors around town during vacation. 

Dr. G. W. Smith, '88, of Kansas City, spent 
Thanksgiving with his mother, in Manhattan. 

Roger Thompson, '05, Rube Kvans, '05, and 
J. (J. Chitty, '05, were in town over Thanks- 
giving. 

C. F. Johnson, '05, wlio is farming near 
Randolph, came in Friday, for a visit with 
friends, etc. 

Mr. McNutt, brother of Miss Cora McNutt, 
and Mr. Mastins. of Ottawa Cniversity, visited 
in Manhattan, Friday and Saturday. 

Invitations art' out for the wedding of Miss 
hula O'Daniel and Mr. Alvin R. Springer, 
both of Manhattan, on Monday. December IH. 

W. J. Wilkinson. '05, who is doing drafting 
work in Kansas City, came in to see how the 
(ootbftll team got along this year without 
him. 

"Pat" Miimiii. 'Hi, who is attending medical 
college in Topeka. came up Thanksgiving to 
see his old team play hall (that is. we suppose 
he came for that ). 

Misses Kllen Hanson and Kthel McKeen en- 
tertained a few friends Saturday evening in 
honor of Miss Hanson's sister, who visited Iter 
over Thanksgiving. 

Wallace Baird, '04, and Alma Handle, 
sophomore in *02, were married at the bride's 
home in Bala, on November 30. They will he 
at home on a farm near Bala. 

J. B. Thompson. '05, who is now in southern 
California, remembered the members of his 
class who were in Manhattan over Thanks- 
giving with a box of luscious oranges. 

Ben Brown, student in the late nineties, 
known on the stage as "Harry Hoyt, M made a 
decided hit as "Jones," an American news- 
paper correspondent, in Cordon and Bennett' s 
*' Royal Slave," which played at Wareham's 
Opera-house, Tuesday evening. Besides play- 
ing the comedy part, he sings many popular 
songs. 



Mr. T. W. Buell. '04. in writing to F. E. 
Balmer. '05, says: "Verily, if Harvard knocks 
football out of college sports, K. S. A. C. will 
knock it in again." 

R \V. Greene, senior in 'Hi, came down 
from Lincoln Center to see the game Thursday. 
He says he was glad to see such a good team, 
but was not surprised, as he always looks for 
football notps in the Herald the first thing. 

Murray S. Cote, '02, writes to have his ad- 
dress changed to Otis, "Via Daggett,'' Cali- 
fornia. He also says; "I am still 'knocking' 
cars for the Salt Lake, enjoy my work as much 
as I can. and always hope for something 
bettor. Any one contemplating a trip to Cali- 
fornia should come via The Salt Lake Route, 
as it is a trip long to be remembered," 




Do Not 
Wait 



«rmorr iw it 
QE MUSE Of MffKMBtt 



For a day with zero 
weather to buy your 
heavy suit and overcoat. 
Follow the wise one and 
make your selection now 
at the store where the 
best selections are to he 
had. 



Young- men's suits 

nobby patterns, 

$10 to $20 



Young* men's swell 

overcoats, 72 to 

75-inch sweep, 

$8.50 to $25 



Rain Coats-Some new ones just in, 
$10 to $20. 



E. L. Knostman. 



THE-STUDENTS' HERALD. 



179 



IT 



••i ■< 



>mmmm< 



=n 



Remember, that the old Reliable 



I 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



■ 



Is the place to buy your Christ- 
mas Boxes and all kinds of 
Christmas Candies. 



I 



Largest Line of Boxes, BesT: and Sweetesl Candies 

PRICES RIGHT 



II 



wwt ■»< 



>«■ 9< 



Right Shoulder, Arms! 



Forward, March! 



*> 



to the 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

To see the finest line of stationery in town— either tablet or box 
form. Everything alongf College supplies we have or can #et at 

your order. 

CHAS. S. JONES, Manager 



J 




mm 



- 






180 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 



H. H. Canwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

P HOTO S 

227 Poyntz Avenue 




All high am & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



-It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 



Feed, Seeds & Fuel 



from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 



Phone 67. 



II. H. Bates* flgr. 



Special Rates to Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE & BELL, Props 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent, 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 



OabaClJb GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

Geo. T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N, Second St, 



Kings 



Fountain Drinks 
Ice'Cream 



Home/made 
Candies 



We Lead, 
Others Follow 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

42 ENGEL BROTHERS 










y^^*K.^^^ 



W. S. ELLIOT 






WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confinn 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYSI HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete Kne of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



DM THE WAY OF CLOTHING x 



Our large experience in handbag student trade during 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X 



mam 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN. KAN. 



:****************************i 




»%»$£&%»%»%%&%& 



We have been busy changing our store so as to handle our Big Holi- 
day Trade more conveniently, and repainting and papering 
so as to display to the best advantage the 

Best Lot of Holiday Goods 




-lft£B HHVE VBT H7CD- 



1 




We have received a Large Line of Fancy Work, both finished articles and 

goods to be made up, and 

Now is the Time to Get these Goods 

while there is plenty of time to make them up. We also have displayed a 
Large Factory Line of Fancy Box Papers and Cloth Weave Paper and Envel- 
opes In bulk, which we are selling at popular prices. 



THE BIG RACKET 



Sli9ft*tt**********tt*?aac9<Xm 



i 

* 
* 




t ? t 



Keuffel & 

* OF N 

813 Locust Street, 



YORK * 

Saint Louis, Mo. 



m 




DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 


1 ^ 


"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 


■ -._--;:-- 1 


"Arrow Brand" 

PP 


k : -m 


m ?^fyW 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paraxon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS ( c & l , s ). 

600-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



Big Cut-price 

Jewelry 

Sale 



Is now on. Come early — 
make your selections for 
Christmas. Store open 
every night until Christ- 



mas. 



The 



ASKiGHf jeweler 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 

and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers, «3C «& 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
dry. Suitable (or class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



\ 



wmm 



■M 



m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



181 



LAST CALL FOR 

CHRISTMAS 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



Don't come in a day or two 

before you want them and 
then be disappointed — we are 
not making 1 tintypes. 



Wolf's - Studio 

Opposite Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 



R B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



21 tt Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

Od Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildlnjr. 

Porcelain bath tubs, fine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, - 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. G HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer you only the best. X X> 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO. 



«■ 



182 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



== IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




^TT Many of YOU STUDENTS will go to your several homes for CHRIST- 
■ j MAS. You will want to take with you some little reminder of the time of 
W_l the year , We believe that you will find a number of suitable things for 

^J presents in our FIVK STOKES under one roof. 
We will he glad to give you any assistance you need when you call in our 
DRY GOODS AND NOTION DEPARTMENT, SHOE DEPARTMENT, LADIES' 
READY-TO-WEAR DEPARTMENT, HARDWARE DEPARTMENT, GROCERY 
DEPARTMENT. 

Our stock of Queensware, Glassware, Decorated Lamps, Fancy China and Clocks, 
etc., in south end of our Grocery Room is worth your inspection. 



We deliver troods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Heady -to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Christmas comes only once a year; let every- 
body both far and near 
come to 



The 

Leader 



To buy Christmas 
presents, because we 
have just received a 
large shipment of 
goods from 
SANTA CLAUS 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

i MANUFACTURERS OF — . 1 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators. 
Safety Corn Harvesters. Little Wonder Churns. 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sash 
Weights. Chimney Caps. Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone ft. 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



PROFESSIONAL. 
DK. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



Moore Bros. & Co. 



34 years of continuous practice should he convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DK. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Pine 
irold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



OfHce in Union Natl. 
Bank Bid*.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone :W7 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
^Jhc 5tuo£nts Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

MottorLetEveiyOne CultivateHis OiuvGemas. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., DECEMBER 14, 1905, 



Number 14 



Seniors S, Juniors 5. 

The annual senior-junior football game 
which took place last Saturday at Athletic 
Park resulted in a tie. the iinal score being 5 
to 5. The juniors, confident of winning, were 
out in full force. They displayed their class 
colors liberally, gave forth noise in large 
quantities, and seemed especially proud of 
their hand, which consisted of a drum, a horn, 
and a pair of cymbals. The seniors, while 
hardly daring to hope for victory, were well 
represented, but they upheld their exalted 
position by a dignified silence, which was 
broken only once or twice by some thoughtless 
member of the *0ti class. 

In weight the '07s had much the advantage. 
They showed that they had been well coached 
and that they had worked hard. Their team 
work was superior to that of their elder 
hrethern, but their quarter used poor judgment 
in calling his plays. The gains for the 
juniors, which were mostly made by Zimmer- 
man, Cudney, and Copeland, were much 
greater than those made by the seniors. 
When the ball was near the center of the field 
the juniors gained almost at will, but when 
near the goal line the senior defense strength- 
ened, and only once could the juniors cross 
the goal line. For the seniors, Cassell and 
Carlson did the best work. R. W. Thurston, 
who played at quarter, had his collar bone 
broken in the first half and was forced to leave 
the game. 

The scoring was all done in the first half. 
The juniors kicked off, secured the ball on 
downs, and after ten minutes of play Orr carried 
it over for a touch-down. The juniors, think- 
ing the game won. then went to sleep and in 
five minutes the seniors had tied the score. 
The ball was captured on downs and advanced 
almost to the goal line on an old worn-out fake 



that was used years ago. On the next play, 
the touch-down was made, ('assell being the 
hero who carried the ball. Everybody waked 
up now and The half ended with the ball in 
possession of the juniors on the seniors' fifteen- 
yard line. 

The second half was played almost entirely 
in senior territory, and it looked as if the game 
would end favorably for the '07s, but the 
seniors always held for downs when their goal 
was in danger. 

Junior Football Reception. 

Acting on the principle that good can be 
bettered, the ever-loyal junior girls entertained 
the junior football players, plus the re si of the 
"naughty" sevens, in the D. S. Hall last Sat- 
urday evening. The rooms were ileeo rated 
with a wondrous display of lace material, 
which was in turn made attractive by innumer- 
able banners, (lags, and other trophies of the 
chase. 

After the usual "hcllos," "howdys," and 
other varied forms of greeting, referee Miss 
Prye called us to order and announced that we 
would now compose songs praising, in part, 
the valor ami excellent qualities of the naught- 
seven class. The hissing of steam and hum of 
machinery was at once heard, and in short 
order the "Naughty-Seven Manufacturing 
Company" had finished about fifteen high- 
grade songs to familiar tunes. By the time 
these were digested we changed our diet and 
tackled the refreshments. Here some difficulty 
arose on account of an ''inequality of the 
sexes," hut even here superior junior judgment 
conq iiered. 

The next course was music, by Misses Ward 
and Hilliard. Not yet satisfied, Miss Ise and 
Miss Berry further convinced us that we were 
O. K. The last course was given by Miss 



mmmmm 



184 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Westgate, who served a very fine roast consist- 
ing of "Wrens," "Huns," "B(w)eavers," and 
"Cassells huilt in air." 

For royal entertainment the girt* certainly 
occupied our time as pleasantly as a king 
could wish, and we predicted that many artists, 
composers and the like would rise from their 
midst in the near future. Here the lights 
winked their warning, so we just naturally 
left, rejoicing that we were members of the 
na ugh tv -seven class. "Jorg." 

Engineers* Association. 

The association was called to order at 7:4") 
p. M. by President Hubbard, in elect rical 
engineering lecture room. After election of 
members we proceeded with the programme, 
which consisted of a number of interesting 
discussions and a paper by H. It. Heira. 
Throughout the meeting the energetic spirit of 
the engineer prevailed. Adjournment, 9j30 
P. m, E. A. Wbkiht. 

Treasurer's Report. 

Treasurer Geo. A. Dean, of the Athletic 
Association, lias made a report which shows 
that the football receipts for the past season 
exceeded the expenses by about $48. This is 
somewhat different from the results of previous 
years, as the association usually comes out 
about $l- r >(l in debt. 

The report in pari was as follows: 

HHSOUKCEH. 

Amount on hand from baseball season ......$ 101 ."VH 

Football season tickets 519 00 

Con trl tuitions and membership dues 41 80 

Receipts of trumes TIB 05 

$1396 13 
UAMLIT1K8. 

Football supplies I tW 88 

Expenses of visiting tcums 1(1 10 

Expenses of College team on trips 290 »:> 

Coach's salary, officials, and work for association. . . 217 2d 

Doctor bills, medicine, printing, banquet, etc 157 28 

lta la nee In treasury 150 02 

*139« 13 

There are still a few outstanding bills, but 
there will still be a nice balance in the treasury 
when the baseball season begins. 



games. The players who will receive these 
monograms are: Scholz, Mai Ion, Kirk, Mont- 
gomery, Conley, Nystrom, Cunningham, Whip- 
ple, Haggman, Ostlund, Blake, and Walker. 



Hamp Creek Christmas Tree. 

"Miss Rosaline Greene, one of the popular 
young ladies of Colville, is teaching a very 
successful school this winter in the Hamp Creek 
neighborhood. Miss Greene writes the editor 
that the pupils of her school, assisted by the 
young folks of the neighborhood, will give a 
Christmas tree next Saturday evening in the 
Hamp Creek schmdhouse. A number of people 
from Colville will attend. Those not acquainted 
in the neighborhood should drive south from 
the Colville post-office until they come to the 
main cross-roads, where they should turn west. 

"Miss Greene's school is composed of excep- 
tionally bright hoys and girls and an entertain- 
ing program will be given. The patrons of the 
school appreciate Miss Greene's untiring efforts 
in behalf of their children and will doubtless 
load the tree with tokens of filial love and 
neighborly good cheer. People leaving presents 
for Hamp Creek folks should take them early so 
they will be put on the tree. Santa Claus will 
be there and he] p distribute the presents? Those 
who do not attend will miss the time of their 
lives. Go and take some presents for your 
friends. The editor of Colville Herald is 



gom 



ir 



n 



Athletic Association. 

At the annual election, held last Tuesday, the 
following officers of the Athletic Association 
were elected for the ensuing year: President, 
Ernest Adams: vice-president, A. D. Holloway; 
secretary, C. E. Whipple: treasurer. Asst. Wm. 
Anderson; general manager, Asst.' Geo. A. 
Dean: student members of board of directors, 
Carrol Walker and Harry Porter: 

A committee was appointed to award mono- 
grams to football players. They decided to 
give College monograms to all members of this 
year's team who had taken part in six scheduled 



'09 Resolutions. 

Whereas, God has seen tit to take from this 
life our friend and classmate Walter Gish, 
be it 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 'd9 
class, extend our sympathies to Mr. J. E, Gish 
and family in the great sorrow that has come 
to them. Kathleen Selhy, 

CLYDE E. BUNDY, 

Vernon E. Bates, 
Committee. 

Alpha Beta. 

President Harris pounded the rock with her 
little hammer an hour earlier than usual, Sat- 
urday, on account of the football game, sched- 
uled for three o'clock. 

The first explosion was some jolly ragtime 
music by Misses Parkes and Martin, after 
Which Gaston prayed for us. Then some 
"long hungry" got impatient to chew some- 
thing, and we passed to the head of business 
and accordingly chewed. By that time some of 
us thought it was time to go to the game, but 
the most of us decided it wasn't, so we backed 
up a bit and listened to the program. 

Miss Ballou and little Ruth Edgerton played 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



185 



piano solos and Shega Suzuki, from fail- 
Japan, sang two Japanese songs in his native 
language. Messrs. Wilson, Page ahd MeKee 
also performed, in the respective roles of Eng- 
lish dude. Italian dago, and Irish hod-carrier. 
After they got through we "Jimmied" around 
awhile and unhitched. Pat. 

Condolence. 

As d .*nth has entered the home of our class- 
mate, Mattie Pittman, we, the mem hers of the 
senior class of K. S. A. C, do puhlicly ex- 
press our sympathy, and we earnestly hope 
that this may in some decree lighten the bur- 
den of her sorrow. Committee. 



Franklins. 

President Thurston called a full house to 
order at 8:15. Mr. Deho hecame a Franklin, 
after which one of the best programs of this 
term was opened by Miss Ho ff nine's select read- 
ing, Th.m Miss Hole introduced the Franklin 
Quartet. This number was followed by Miss 
Trunk's declamation. Kirby convinced the 
judges that the modern daily newspaper is a 
detriment to mankind, in dehate with Mr. Bull. 
Miss O rah am read a good number of the 
"Spectator." Mr. Yerkes then favored us 
with a well-prepared vocal solo as the last 
number on the program. 



Websters. 

President Kiene rapped for order at 7:45 
o'clock. Roll-call showed that most of the jun- 
ior members were somewhere else, probably in 
the D. S. Hall. The first number of the pro- 
gram was Grover Kahl's music, furnished by 
Mr. Su. accompanied by Miss Knhl. Jesse 
George gave a very good discussion in a pleas- 
ing manner, which showed that Jesse will make 
a talker in the days to come. George Savage 
read a medley. This was followed by Charles 
Gillikinson, who, with a strong company of 
Webs., gave a play. "Son" Kirk did the crit- 
icising, after which came a few extemporane- 
ous speeches and a short business session. 

' ' Banty. ' ' 

lonlans. 

Vice-president Laura Lyman called society 
to order and, after singing and devotion, roll- 
call was responded to by quotations from 
Irving. 

First number on the program was a piano 
solo furnished by Miss Hilliard, which was 
very much appreciated by the society. Cora 
McNutt then showed the lonians' knowledge 
on Rules of Order by a parliamentary quiz. 
The next number was a very instructive essay 
on "The Horse," by Katherine Ward. She 



had her subject very definitely outlined by a 
drawing. Mr. Cowles, accompanied by FJsie 
Brown, then favored us with a cornet solo. 
We especially enjoyed this, as we do not have 
music of this kind very often. Helen Inskeep 
read a good "Oracle," which was followed hy 
an amusing play given by Gertrude Grizzell 
and others. 

Our business session was interesting. 

M. R. C. 

To Our President. 
We. the members of the Ionian society, de- 
sire to express our deepest sympathy to Mattie 
Pittman in this time of her bereavement, hop- 
ing that it may help to lighten the burden of 
her sorrow. Margaret Cunningham, 

Marion Van Liew, 

^ I A Y I *MHER< JER, ( 'flllllll )t1f>i>. 



Basket-ball Tournament at Qlasco. 

A basket-hall tournament was held in 
Glaseo, December 7-!). for the decision of the 
State championship. K, S. A, C. was repre- 
sented by a picked team which had never 
practiced together on a floor and which con- 
sequently expected little success in playing 
against teams which have had the benefit of all 
necessary equipment for playing the game. 
However, the team played hard and succeeded 
in winning one game out of the five that were 
played. 

The College boys played two games Friday 
evening, one game Saturday afternoon and 
two games Saturday evening. Wash hum. K. 
S. A. C, Campbell, Minneapolis H. S., Glaseo 
H. S., and Glaseo Athletics were represented. 
Washhurn, Glaseo H. S., and Glaseo Athletics 
tied for first place, each losiug one game. 

Many brilliant plays were made during the 
tournament. Hope, of Washhurn, and Ferris 
and Topping were among the best players on 
the floor. 

The scores made by our boys were: 

K. S. A. C 11 Campbell 18 

K. S. A. C 15 Glaseo Athletics. .. .23 

K. S. A. C ,20 Glaseo H. S 98 

K. S. A. C 22 Washburn .43 

K. S. A. C 15 Minneapolis H. S.. . <i 



Coach Qulgley's Joke 

Coach Quigley, of St. Mary's, has selected an 
All-Kansas football team. He has chosen the 
Washburn hacks for the team, with Pooler of 
K. U. as quarter and captain. It is very evi- 
dent that he did not see our backs when they 
played against Washburn or the line-up would 
have been different. Scholz was selected as 
full-back and captain of the second team. 

A single honor acquirpd is surety for more. 
— Roc)iefoucauld. 



— • 



180 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Wotts: Let Evt BY 
Or CwiTivATt Hi* 

Printed in Oolle jre PrlQtfO* Depart- 
ment by student labor. 

Kntered at the post-otrlee at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class in alter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Sinjrle copies, five cents. _^___ 



F. A. Kiene. Jit. ."00 Editor-in-chief 

(IKOVEH Kahl.'o; IJusiness Manager 

E.O, Far it ah. "or Literary Editor 

L. K. CIahton.'iW - Local Kditor 

S. W. (Tn n inch am. 'OK F.xehantre Editor 

('. E. WHIPPLE. "07 Assoc*. Business Manage r 

J, S. MoN'n;uMEiiv. *i>7 Subscription Manager 

(]KAi'KHAWKlNfV'«» Assoc Liieul Fdi tors 

A.ti. PHtLLIPS. 07 r Assoc, uocai j.cmois 

Elizabeth SfflR. '01 .Alumni Edi tor 

Jas. R. Cox en. '<>H Keiiorter 

All orders Tor subscriptions and incpiiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
man awe rs. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not late-t 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subserii*- 
lion is due and that you are most respect fully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Kwekt. '04, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Dec. 14, 1905. 




The fall election of Herald start officers 
passed off smoothly, and the new members are 
now at work and are trying to make the paper 
the l>est in the land. You help them do it. 



We wish to place again before the alumni of 
the College the offer of a year's subscription 
to the Herald for each worthy contribution 
received, accepted and printed in its pages. 
These articles need not concern College life, 
but may deal with varied experiences, ques- 
tions of the day, or stories real and of the 
imagination. Discussions of college and uni- 
versity life in other states will be doubly ac- 
ceptable. 

The game last Saturday between the junior 
and senior classes to our mind was devoid of 
every good point connected with football as 
played here. Beside being dangerous on ac- 
count of inexperience and poor tackling, it was 
further made objectionable by being utterly de- 
void of good nature and the spirit of play. 



Every feeling of College fellowship seemed to 
be buried under an inordinate desire to win, 
and we feel that few people left the field with a 
good impression or a sensation of pleasure. 
To our mind it would not he a bad innovation 
if class football games were prohibited. 

As our football team is to be awarded mono- 
grams this fall, and as monograms for the 
track, baseball and basket-ball divisions of 
athletics are contemplated, one point should be 
brought strongly to the minds of all. The 
monogram thus used becomes a special honor 
conferred for an exhibition of athletic worth 
and ability. It should be exclusive, and must 
be so ir wearing it is to mean anything to the 
wearer or to those who see it. As four divisions 
of College athletics exist there will necessarily 
he four different styles of monograms. This 
number will about cover all that have thus far 
been designed, and even an imitation of any 
form will detract from the value of the real. 
We would like to urge that all students who 
have not won monograms on an athletic field 
refrain from wearing any form on either sweater 
or cap. and that those who have them discard 
them as far as the public is concerned. 

This week two teams representing the College 
are in Chicago competing for prizes in stock 
and grain judging'. One of the prizes rests in 
Faircluld Hall, and the grain- judging team is 
working to hold it for another year. The 
other has never been secured by the College, 
hut the team that is working for it this season 
is strong and will make a hard light to win. If 
these contests mean anything in advertisement 
for the College it is surely no more than right 
that the expense of the teams should be paid. 
We have been represented by an athletic team 
this fall and we have gladly supported it both 
financially and personally. Here is a chance 
to do a good work and to show to every one 
that we are willing to hack any and all enter- 
prizes which, we are convinced, are for the 
general good of the College and its students. 
The writer can testify as to what it means to 
have forty dollars taken from a pocket that 
only contains twenty. Most of the boys who 
are in Chicago are working their way through 
school, and a little assistance will be doubly 
acceptable to them. Several students are go- 
ing around with papers this week, and e very- 
student should subscribe to this fund. The 
railroad fare is about seventeen dollars, and 
it is hoped that this amount will be made up 
for each man on the team. 



Young man. don't seek a position: hustle for 
a job. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



187 



Sophomores 0, Freshmen 0. 

The sophomore -freshmen • football game at 
the athletic park last Monday resulted in a tie, 
neither side being able to score. The" game 
was an Interest! n g, we 1 1 - p 1 a y ed contes 6 in which 
the players on both sides placed clean, bard 
football. The sophomores had a little the ad- 
vantage in weight, but this was .made up by the 
team work of the fresh ies.. The sophomores 
were a little weak on defence at times, but once 
they held the youngsters for downs on their own 
ten -yard line, after having been pushed back 
from three to eight yards on each play. The 
ground gaining was about ecpial for each side. 
The freshmen had the best of the first part of 
each half, while the sophomores had things go- 



Alumni and Former Students. 

Elsie Lupfer, D. S. short course '05, is vis- 
iting friends in Manhattan. 

Miss Mary Hall, '04. is now in Los Angeles, 
Cal., where she has a position in the Good 
Samaritan Hospital. 

Miss Bessie Hudson, of College Hill, a for- 
mer student, has returned from Winfield, where 
she has been the past year. 

Ray Felton, '0!, was about Col leg." last 
week. He and his brother are practicing 
scientific agriculture in McPhsrsbo county. 

Harriet ( Thackrey ) Reece, *!)S, left for her 



ing their way in the latter part -of each. At the home in Valentine, N T eb., Tuesday, after an 



end of the first half the sophomores" had the ball 
on their opponent's fifteen-yard line, after hav- 
ing advance it forty yards in six plays. 

The l»est work for the sophomores was done 
by Hayes at rijfht half and Hamilton at quar- 
ter. Case, Wilson and .Long at ends also did 
good work. For the freshmen Meyers, Graves 
and Canfield were the ground gainers. Word en 
at full and Hart at tackle also did fairlv well. 



Additional Locals, 

School closes Friday, December 22. 

Miss Viola Thompson was called home last 
Thursday on account of the death of her 
nephew. She does not expect to return next 
term. 

A petition was circulated last week among 
the boys who drill asking the Board of Regents 
to allow the cadets to wearkhaiki uniforms in 
warm weather. 

Recently one of our professors asked the 
Presbyterian minister of Manhattan to accom- 
pany him on a trip to the country to visit a 
school. The minister accented the invitation 
and a start was made. The visitors were 
forced to stop at a farm house not a great dis- 
tance from the school to inepjire the way. They 
then proceeded to the house of elementary 
learning and accomplished the purpose of the 
trip. In the evening the teacher returned to 
the boarding house, which happened to be the 
one at which the travelers had inquired the 
way, and naturally was beset with much 
curiousity. She made answer to inquiry that 
the distinguished looking visitors were Pro- 
fessor Blank of the College and the Preshy- 
terian minister of Manhattan. In return her 
sensibilities were somewhat shocked by the 
assurance that they had taken the bearded 
gentleman to be the father of the smooth 
shaven clerical appearing man beside him. 



extended visit with her mother on College Hill. 
W. J. Brown, who has been out of College 
since early in the term, returned last week and 
will go with the stock- judging team to Chicago. 
He still limps a little. 

Miss Kihel demons delightfully entertained 
the '05 girls of Manhattan at a six o'clock 
dinner last Wednesday evening, in honor of 
Miss Nellie Baird, of Marquette. 

Miss Olive Dunlap, '(>."», of Leonard ville, 
passed through Manhattan last Wednesday on 
her way to Chicago, where she has accepted a 
position in the Glenwood Manual Training 
School. 

The many friends of Ed. Ad am son, r 06, who 
is now in New York, will be glad to learn that 
lie is steadily recovering from his recent illness 
of typhoid pneumonia and will soon be ahle 
to leave the hospital. 

F. N. Gill is, "03, has recently been elected 
cashier of the First State Bank, at Wishek, 
North Dakota, and treasurer of the Wishek 
Creamery Company, so is not in need of some- 
thing to occupy his time. 

Miss Kthel Alexander, who has been teach- 
ing in Iowa the past year, returned to her 
home in Manhattan last week. After visiting 
her sister Mamie in Pittsburg, Kan., for a few 
weeks, she may enter College. 

Arthur Johnson, '04, who has heen in charge 
of a ranch in the South, has given up his work 
there and ' is going West to seek a better 
climate. He came in last week from the 
hospital, where be has been for some time. 



Chicago University has made a new student 
regulation. No freshman or sub-freshman 
shall smoke either on the campus or in any 
university buildings except the dormitories. 
This regulation could be enforced with good 
results in our Kansas colleges. 



s 



188 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Skates sharpened at Frost & Davis. 

Russel Porter is back in College again. 

Hasket-ball in the City Park every afternoon. 

See that $1.00 Safety Razor at Frost & Davis. 

Hubert Popenoe has b?en entertaining a large 
boil lately. 

Miss Pearl Tebow, of Concordia, visited her 
brother last week. 

The Hamilton program artist will take spell- 
ing le.sons next term. *••" 

Have yon noticed Lambert's new, red sweater? 
Doesn't' he look stunning? 

The Zodiac Club will give its last dance next 
Monday evening, December 18. 

Don't forget to buy your Christmas sta- 
tionery at the Students' Co-op. bookstore. 

An eight- pound box of "macaroni" was 
stolen from the junior party Saturday night. 

Ross Sweet is making a reputation as a duck 
hunter. He captured two at one shot last week. 

The freshmen defeated the high school foot- 
ball team last Thursday by the score of 10 to H. 

Ernest Davis was selected as the Hamilton 
orator for the inter-society contest next month. 

The Hort. Department purchawsed a ne 
seoop-shovel last week for the use of one of the 
boys. 

Miss Mary Evans, accompanied by her 
mother, made a short trip to Kansas City last 
week. 

A useful present for Christmas would be a 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pen. For sale at 
Students' Coop, store. 

Bun Thurston is taking first woodwork and 
is now able to plane a board without wearing it 
out before it is square. 

The juniors celebrated their victory (?) over 
the seniors by a party at the D. S. building 
last Saturday evening. 

About ten of the "Finley crowd" went skat- 
ing on Wild Cat last Friday evening. McLean 
chaperoned the crowd. 

Prof. M. M. Hastings desires all his friends 
to visit him at the poultry show this week. He 
will be on exhibition there. 

T. H. Irwin, of Salina, was a College visitor 
last week. He has a son in College now, and 
will send another one next term. 

W. T. Morrison, junior last year, visited 
College Monday. He has been working in 
Pueblo, Colo., during the last year. 



James Bell, who fell from the football special 
on the way to Lawrence, was taken from the 
city hospital to his home in Kansas City last 
week. 

Captain Shaffer has been spending his spare 
time lately in making a heavy packing chest. 
He expects to use it when he goes to the Philip- 
pines. 

Reverend Gelvin will address the young men 
at the Y. M. C. A. parlors next Sunday after- 
noon. His subject will be, "Why I l>elieve in 
Missions." 

E. L. Knostman expects to build a two-story 
business block on the site he now occupies. 
This will greatly improve the appearance of 
Poyntz Avenue. 

Bargains in heated and lighted rooms for 
girls that are clean, physically, mentally, and 
morally. See Mrs. J. H, Akin, 830 Moro 
street, corner 7th. 

Washburn is blowing about the great work 
of their two Rooters' Clubs. The students for- 
get that these were only organized after seeing 
the results of our own clubs. 

Professor Erf returned from the dairy train 
last Tuesday to help with the poultry show. 
Assistant Melick has taken his place. The 
trip will end about December Hi. 

Heard at the junior reception: 

Here's to the boys who'd love us 

If we only cared. 
Here's to the boys we'd love 

If we only dared. 

All the chickens in the egg-laying contest 
have been returned to their owners and at pres- 
ent the experiments consist in breeding up a 
two hundred egg-laying strain of white Leg- 
horns. 

Several boys walked ten miles out in the 
country one night recently in search of a box 
social at a country school house. The only 
thing they managed to find was their way back 
to town, at about I a. m. 

Mr. Bell, a printer from Tarkio, Mo., was 
visiting College last Thursday in company with 
Rev. J. W. Hannum, of the United Presbyterian 
church. He was favorably impressed both with 
the Printing Department and with the College 
papers. 

The Faculty " never sweats," were forced to 
taste the bitter cup of defeat, at basket-ball 
last week. The score was 22 to 12 against 
them. The victors were a .picked team of 
College students. 

STUDENTS. "NEVER SWEATS." 

Caney Center Melick 

Topping Guard Booth 

Kittell Guard Anderson 

Ferris Forward McLean 

Carr Forward Ahearn 

The Y. M. C. A. basket-ball team attended 
the basket-ball carnival at Glasco last Friday 
and Saturday. The boys had practiced a few 
days in the city park but had not played on a 
floor, so they ->were handicapped on this ac- 
count. They played five games, losing four. 
The game won was with the Minneapolis high 
school. The games lost were with Glasco high 
school, Glasco Athletic Club, Washburn Col- 
lege, and Campbell University. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



189 



Gold Spectacles, Gold Pens, Bert Fountain Pens, Souvenir Spoons, Sterling 
Silver Brushes and Gold Crosses. Lether goods are all the go. Books of all 
kinds. Music Rolls. We are selling at one-half price all Violins, Guitars, 
Mandolins, Acordions and Sheet Music. 



Diamond GoW Lo ckets 

Rings 



Wedding 

Rings 
Bund Rings 
Opal Rings 
Hundreds of 
Ri ngs 



Stick Pins 
Fine Chains 
Rich Charms 
Beautiful 

Pins 



Low 
Prices 



R. E. Lofinck 



Good 



Elgin and 



DIAMONDS 

Best Silver ward, Watches, Clacks, Jewelry 

1879 CHRISTMAS 1905 

Every watch, piece of jewelry or silverware is 
fully guaranteed. 



Goods | Z aUham 

Watches the 



finest in the 



Boss. Fahys 
and other 
good watch 



known world cases that tire 



and very reas- 
onable, 

*7.00 to $75.00 



as reliable us 
gold dollars. 



Toys of all kinds— Dolls, Express Wagons, Hobby Horses, Boys' and Girls' 
Sleds. All kinds of games— "Archarina," "Flinch" and "Worthwhile." We 
have many other things too numerous to mention. To appreciate your pur- 
chases, we have concluded to make free gifts as follows, which we present with 
each sale made at one time: :: :: :: :: 



Amt. of Sale Article given away Value 
10 50 - Pencil or scratch-book 5c 

1 00 -Pearl hat pin. collar button, box stationery. 10c 

2 00 -Any piece of jewelry or stick pin... 20c 

:i 00- Any piece of jewelry, china or glassware. 30c 

4 00 -Any piece of jewelry, china or book.. . , ....40c 

5 00 -Any piece jewelry. china. silverware, book, 50c 



Amt, of Sale Article given away Value 
* 6 00— Any piece of jewelry, china or silverware 65c 

7 00— Any piece jewelry, china, silverware or book, 75c 

8 00— Any piece jewelry, china, silverware or book, 75c 

9 00— Any piece jewelry, silverware, china or book. 85c 
10 00— Any piece jewelry, silverware, china, book. *i 35 

and so on up to *50 00. 



See that $1.00 Safety Razor at Frost & Davis. 

Assistant Wood has joined Captain Shaffer's 
fencing class. 

The assignment committee is having troubles 
of its own this week. 

Genuine Barney and Berry skates from tide, 
to $1.50 at Frost & Davis. 

Several crippled cadets moulded bullets in- 
stead of drilling last week. 

Miss V. Brooks was out of College several 
days last week on account of sickness. 

Miss Bess Parks spent Saturday and Sunday 
at the home of her uncle on College Hill. 

The clothing men have been ''scrapping" 
each other lately by means of reduction sales. 

Mrs. Thurston gave a suppsr, December 5, 
in honor of the twentieth birthday of her son, 
Wren. 

Reverend Bunge, of Wakeeny, accompanied 
by two friends, visited College between trains 
Monday. 

Company f, K. N. G., will have its annual 
inspection Friday night. Milton Snodgrass 
is captain. 

During the absence of Assistant Melick, 
"Professor" Nystrom has charge of the dairy 
" lab." classes. 

The U. P. railroad is advertising "light and 
airy coaches." That's not the kind we want 
this cold weather. 



Professor Potter gave a lecture on the 
"Political Conditions in Russia" before the 
Manhattan Commercial Club last week. 

The annual meeting of the Manhattan Horti- 
cultural Society will be held in the Horticul- 
tural building this afternoon, at .'J p. m. An 
interesting program is assured. 

C. I. Weaver was quite seriously injured 
while playing football last Thursday^ He was 
unable to be at dress parade the next day, so 
his 1st lieutenant, "Son John," had charge of 
Co. "B." 

About o'clock Sunday evening a small 
blaze was discovered on the roof over the 
foundry. It was extinguished before any 
damage was done. It is not known how it 
started. 

Earl Cole, in a letter from the Philippines to 
his home, says that Hassman, Harris and him- 
self are getting fat on army "grub." During 
the rainy season, which is "it" just now, they 
spend most of their time in the battalion library. 

A chicken show is in progress this week at 
the College barn. The exhibit is worth seeing 
and admission is free. This show is held un- 
der the direction of the Dairy and Animal In- 
dustry Departments. Mr. Lamb, of Manhat- 
tan, is secretary. Allen Philips feeds the 
chickens while Milo Hastings explains to visit- 
ors why little hens lay large e^g^. The 
chickens come from all over Kansas and stu- 
dents are invited to call around and renew 
acquaintance with their friends from home. 



190 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



ONE-FOURTH 
.\ OFF .'. 



Let=Qo Sale 



COONS 



Twenty -five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lny in a good supply now? Our Hnnd- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 



Meet 

Our Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Largest Stock 
Shoes In City 






"Thou Shalt Not Steal" 



© 



HUT YOU MAY KEEL* TWENTY CENTS 
ON EVERY DOLLAR HY BUYINU YOUR 

SUIT or OVERCOAT 



AT 



Knostman's 



$10 Suit or Overcoat, now 

$12 Suit or Overcoat, now 

$15 Suit or Overcoat, now 

$18 Suit or Overcoat, now 



$8.00 

9.60 

12.00 

14.40 



20 per cent on 
10 per cent on 
10 per cent on 



SWEATERS 

PANTS 

SHOES 



WE ARE GOING TO REBUILD 
AND WANT MONEY 



The foundry expects to make a run Saturday. 

F. L. Osburn, who has been suffering from 
an attack of appendicitis, expects to he out in 
a few days. 

Mrs. Louis Wabnitz has been entertain in g 
Iter sisters Mrs. Knell, 61 Omaha, and Mrs. 
Whitehead, of Now York, for the past week. 

The Y. M. and Y. W. social given in the 
Women's Gymnasium, Monday evening, was 
a decided success. About one hundred seventy 
were present. 

The choir of the Methodist church will render 
an oratorio entitled "The Seven Words of 
Christ." this evening. A musical treat is 
assured to those who attend. 

W. W. McLean took a plunge through the 
ice on the Wild Cat, Monday morning. Help 
was near at hand and he was rescued before he 
went down for the ''last time." 

J. A. Richards and F. A. Adams had an 
exciting runaway last Friday afternoon. By 
substituting ropes in place of thills they hoped 
to secure greater flexibility than is usual on 
buggies. The flexibility part worked all 
ri»ht, but the horse objected. During the 
excitement and while the horse was making 
sixty-foot jumps, the boys were thrown out and 
Richards ran his little* finger into the D. S. 
coal house. After breaking several acres of 
corn stalks for the Farm Department, the horse 
was captured with the buggy intact. The 
spectators could not decide whether the boys 
or the horse were the more frightened. 






HOLIDAY GOODS 



I 






i 



Our stock is larger than ever and prices are right. Look at our gift books, copyright 
books, boys' and girls' books, children's books, dolls, leather goods, toilet and manicure 
sets, military hair brushes, fancy goods, etc., before you buy. We can save you money. 
No nicer gift than a Waterman's Fountain Pen. We have them. 

ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



i 



.-■ 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



191 



IT 



1 



Remember, that the old Reliable 



i 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



• 



I 



Is the place to buy your Christ- 
mas Boxes and all kinds of 
Christmas Candies. 



I 



Largest Line of Boxes, Be£ and Sweetest Candies 

PRICES RIGHT 



I 



L- 



■ •I WB% 



J 



r 



Right Shoulder, Arms! 



Forward, March! 



to the 



^ 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

To see the finest line of stationery in town—either tahlet or box 
form. Everything along- College supplies we have or can get at 

your order. 

CHAS. S. JONES, Manager 



J 




M 



192 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



.»-.. + -*•• ».♦.•♦» 



Students* Co-op. Boarding Club 

Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes (or the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 




H. Conwell, 



Steward. 



:xsfiiaaott 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLAS S 

PHOTOS 

227 Poyntz A venue 




AUingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



-It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 



Phone 67. 



H. H. Bates, ftgr. 



Special Rates lo Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE eV BELL, Props 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue- Phone 74 



CCTTHC THAT 
OLJLZUO GROW 

Elevator on C R. I. fir P. Ry, 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113*15 N. Second St. 



Kings 



Fountain Drinks 
IccCream 



Home-made 

Candies 



We Lead, 

Others Follow 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 

$1 PER YEAR. 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

&£ ENGEL BROTHERS 




:i)fttW 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. <J If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
•I Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest <J Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

and 11 Drumm Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 TouviUe Square 

TORONTO 

75 and 77 York Street 

WINNIPEG 
248 McDermet Avenue 



| THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

========== JOHN PURCELL ========== 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 



327 POYNTZ AVE. 

Telephone No. 34. 



We Deliver Goods Promptly § 
to Any Part of the City .... 




College Campus Restaurant 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters. Sodas, and Confections... 



GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 









m 



.«h«w»im hh«»*hhmmh»^^ 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. X X X 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * x 



Our large experience in handling student trade during 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X 



mam 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



ggggggSgggggggggggggggggggggg* 



M 

I 

* 

I 

gTHE 



Since Santa Claus gave away the Books and Candy to the Children at our Store Saturday 

THIS STORE IS NOT 
GIVING AWAY ANYTHING 



BUT WE ARE GIVING YOU BIG VALUE FOR YOUR MONEY IN 

every article of Holiday Goods you buy at the Big Racket. Remember we 
make it our Special Business to handle the Holiday Trade; we buy Toys, 
Dolls, Celluloid Goods, Toilet Cases, Manicure Sets, Comb and Brush Sets, 
Fancy China, Art Pottery, Novelties, etc. direct from the Factory and the 
Importer, and in large quantities. This means that you can buy from us 
with confidence that you are getting the Best Assortment and most Desir- 
able Goods to select from, and the Lowest Possible Prices. As usual at 
this time, we ask all who can to come in the morning, as this store is always 
crowded in the afternoon. 



* 

% 

* 
* 

% 

* 
* 
* 



BIG RACKET! 



-. '•■»■-■ i*-.V:_ ^. 



r 



%he Students' Herald j 




I 

I 



Christmas Number 
1905 



I 
I 









Keuffel & Esser Co. 

•# OF NEiAi YORK * 
813 Locust Street, - Saint Louis, Mo. 



64 

DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 



titf 

DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
\WING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS yBwJ. 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



■uix&rfSV&WA 



S3 * V>i*,VM. ', W^\ W. ■> 



Big Cut-price 

Jewelry 

Sale 



Is now on. Come early — 

make your selections for 
Christmas. Store open 
every night until Christ- 



mas. 



/t^Alw/i Jeweler 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate. X 



Phon< 



226 




f 



\ 



■V 



i 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



193 



LAST CALL FOR 

CHRISTMAS 

PHOTOGRAPHS 



Don't come in a day or two 
before you want them and 
then be disappointed we are 
not making tintypes. 

Wolfs - Studio 

Opposite Library 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



E B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



2 H> Poyntz Ave,, 



Manhattan, Kan. 



J. W. BELL 
Hack & Baggage 

PHONE 59. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

T HE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati. O.. Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1,00 
302 Poyntz P, C, HOSTRUP, Prop, 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



ao to 

n. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best. X X* 

W. M, STINGLEY & CO. 



194 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




CHRISTMA S GOODS 

In our Five Stores under One Roof You will find a 
GOOD Assortment on SALE at Reasonable Prices 

We will be £lad to give you any assistance you need when you call in our 
DRY GOODS AND NOTION DEPARTMENT, SHOE DEPARTMENT, LADIES' 
ready-to-wear DEPARTMENT, HARDWARE DEPARTMENT, GROCERY 
DEPARTMENT. 

Our stock of Queensware, Glassware, Decorated Lamps, Fancy China and Clocks, 
etc., in south end of our Grocery Room is worth your inspection. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Keady-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Christmas comes only once a year; let every- 
body both far and near 
come to 



The 

Leader 



To buy Christmas 
presents, because we 
have just received a 
large shipment of 
goods from 
SANTA CLAUS 



Moore Bros. & Co. 



Blue Valley Manufacturing Co. 

MAWIIPAffTllRFRS OF > 

Sweep and Power Feed Mills, Disc Cultivators. 
Safety Corn Harvesters, Little Wonder Chums, 
Perfection Lawn Swings. Oak Stoves, Sasli 
Weights, Chimney Caps, Structural Iron Work. 
Stove Repairs, etc. Phone 6. 



Manhattan, Kan. 



706 N. Third Street. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

PROFESSIONAL. 
DR. G. A. ClUSE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone, Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
BankBldg., Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 







Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jme Students Or The 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

MottaliecEveiyOne Cultivate His Oiuv Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., December 21, 1905. 



Number 15 



A Christmas Story, 

One of the pleasant valleys at the foot of the 
high hills of eastern Kansas is the country dis- 
trict known as Fairview. A beautiful stream 
called Rock creek ripples over the pebbles on 
its way to join Blue river several miles below. 
But now the water is frozen over and the creek, 
is lined with young people who are making 
the time count, for not in years has the skating 
been so good. The bright skates clink over 
the ice, and many figures are cut by those who 
have become skilled in the exercise. 

The mothers have given up the thought of 
any help from their daughters, even though it 
is vacation— with the mincemeat to be made 
for Christinas, and countless other things that 
the busy housewife finds to do at this season 
of the year. 

In a small cottage near the hill lives Miss 
Matilda Neal, a spinster of some fifty years of 
age, and aunt to pretty Minnie Neal of eighteen 
summers, whose blithe figure is at this moment 
skillfully cutting her name on the ice with her 
.skates. 

The aunt from her window sees her fair, young 
niece as she spins over the ice, and her feelings 
are expressed in the exc lamination, "Land 
sakes! what can my brother Horace mean by 
lettin' that girl cut sich capers? Now, in my 
day when vacation come 'round I had to stay 
at home and help my mother with the knittin' 
and I larned to make bread and to do other 
useful things. There's Horace's wife workin' 
herself half to death fixin' for a big Christmas 
dinner, and the Christmas tree the night before, 
and that big gal spend in' half the day skatin'. 
You can depend on it Silas Burdett aint far off. 
So he's been off studyin' to be a doctor, and 
spendin' heaps of his Pa's money as I've hearn 
tell. Humph! much of a doctor he'll make," 
and she rocked faster and faster as if to quiet 



her feelings, **but I'd hate to trust my Tabby 
cat to his care." And she cast a loving look 
toward her favorite cat asleep on her best sofa 
pillow. 

Silas Burdett did not know of the unfavora- 
ble impression he was making upon the aunt of 
the girl, with whom he had spent such a pleas- 
ant morning, and as he removed her skates he 
thought the face flushed with the splendid exer- 
cise was more beautiful than any of the fash- 
ionable ladies he had met in the two-years' stay 
at the Medicinal College in Chicago. Silas 
was a capable judge in this as in other respects, 
and was the pride of his parents, who had seen 
him graduate with honors in the home College, 
and now read with satisfaction the short clip- 
pings from the papers that told of their boy's 
success. 

They were happy parents now with Silas, 
well and strong, home for two weeks vacation, 
and they were glad that he enjoyed the skating 
and the company of the neighbor boys and girls 
as well as he did before going away to college. 
To-day his mother had made him the current 
cake of which he was so fond, and had put it 
by his plate just as she used to do when, for a 
well- filled chip basket, he deserved a special 
reward. And after dinner as he tied on his 
mother's big apron, which only came to his 
knee?, he whispered, "Now mother, you are to 
sit in the rocking chair and watch your Polly 
wash the dishes, for that cake beats boarding- 
house diet all to pieces." 

Meantime Minnie Neal had helped her mother 
put dinner on the table, had comforted the 
baby, and found a box which her small brother 
Tommy wanted for his sled. A person pass- 
ing through the neighborhood would have con- 
sidered it a very happy place until they reached 
Miss Matilda Neal's cottage. That lady had 
not vet recovered from seeing Silas and the 



196 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



young niece walk contentedly home together, 
and though no one was near to hear it she had 
exclaimed, as Silas carefully helped Minnie 
across the icy place. ''Mercy me! a body 
would think the gal couldn't walk alone, the 
way he's helpin* her. I've walked over that ice 
spot more than a dozen times a fetch in' old 
Brindal home and aint fell down neither." 

fHAPTKR M. 

It was only two days until Christmas and the 
Sunday school had decided to have a Christmas 
tree in the old schoolhouse on Christmas eve. 
The Committees had been hard at work and had 
secured from one of the farmers a beautiful 
cedar tree, which was now securely fastened in 
one corner of the school house. Its limbs 
looked strong enough to hold all that the 
generous people could hang upon them. 

There was to be a program and the children 
had been drilled as well as it is possible to 
drill children just before Christmas. This 
night the young people of the neighborhood 
met at the schoolhouse to string pop-corn and 
cranberries, to sack candy and other things to 
put upon the tree. They were busy and happy 
young people as they trimmod the tree, and the 
kind heart of Minnie Neal slipped extra nuts 
into the sacks that she filled and labeled for 
the Smith children, whose father had been killed 
in a railroad accident only a year before. 

The next day. skating was positively for- 
bidden, for other homes were like Mrs. Neal's, 
filled with the orders that suggest a big dinner 
very soon. There was mince, pumpkin and 
apple pie, fruit-cake, seed-cake, pound-cake and 
the whole family of cakes to make. There were 
tarts and doughnuts to prepare and the ham to 
roast. The big turkey was to be dressed that 
it might freeze over night. The rooms were to 
be cleaned and the fires to be laid ready for 
lighting. Minnie arranged the sprigs of holly 
and mistletoe with the greatest care, for was 
not the Burdett family to, take dinner with.them 
to-morrow and ( with a sigh ) Aunt Matilda too? 
But then "she may be pleasant," thought 
hopeful Minnie, for there had been a day when 
Aunt Matilda had been as young and pretty as 
her niece, and had really liked to skate in spite 
of her assertion to the contrary. 

"The day has been so short," said Mrs. 
Neal, as she smoothed out her long hair pre- 
paratory for going to the Christmas tree. "But 
I have nearly everything done, and I hope the 
Christmas tree will be satisfactory to those who 
have worked as hard as have I in preparation. 
My! I haven't had nicer bread for a long time.'' 

"Why, Ma," said Tommy as he popped his 
head in at the open door, "it has been the long- 
est day in the whole year." And Tommy had 



done enough to last for the whole year. He 
had picked the raisins out of the cake, upset a 
cup of grease on the nicely mopped floor, and 
had worked an hour fixing a pail of mud with 
which he intended to rub the lines when Silas 
came in his new cutter to take Minnie to the 
Christmas tree. 

He jumped as he heard a noise and was 
around the house in a moment, but why need he 
hurry? for well he knew he had hidden Minnie's 
curling-iron and taken the strings out of her 
shoes, on purpose to keep Silas waiting. But, 
"all things come to him who will but wait," 
and Minnie came down with no trace of dis- 
appointment in her face to tell of a small 
brother's trick. 

But Silas was not so patient and calm when 
his new gloves were so badly soiled with 
the fresh mud, and said with more anger in his 
tones than Minnie had ever heard him use be- 
fore, "A good hickory sprout and some one to 
use it would be a suitable Christmas gift for 
that lad, I think." 

But the sleigh-ride behind the fast horse was 
greatly enjoyed by both, and Tommy would not 
have suffered had he met them as they drove 
up to the schoolhouse door, 

The program passed off with the usual amount 
of forgetting by the children and prompting 
by the elders, but no one ventured to criticise 
the splendid address made by Silas Burdett. 
Even Aunt Matilda mentally concluded that 
young Silas could talk as well as skate. 

The Christmas tree was well lighted and well 
filled. There were presents for the old as well 
as for the young people and children. It was 
a pleasure to see the dancing eyes of the little 
ones as one after the other received a doll, a 
drum, a whistle or some other token of love. 
Among the last things handed down was a large 
square box, and the name Miss M. Neal was 
distinctly heard. Minnie blushingly arose to 
receive the gift, but Aunt Matilda was ahead; 
and she almost fell over one child, in her ea- 
gerness to get the box, exclaiming as she did so, 
"La! what pretty thing have I got?" 

She carried the box to her seat and nervously 

untied the strings with which it had been so 

carefully tied. Her eyes sparkled almost as 

brightly as Minnie's would have done, as she 

looked upon the beautiful wreath of white roses 

which surrounded a box of choice fruits and 

candies. A small card lay on the top which 

read : 

I want to uive this (rift to thee. 
And hope that you will accept from me. 
This Christmas time, my special frreeting— 
And, may we ko to-morrow skating':'— s. B. 

"Lame! and who could have sent me this? 
Nobody but Simon Bailey sure as I live, and 



aSfififiS 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



197 



yonder he's smilin* and lookin' so queer. 
Wall if others can skat' 1 . I fan too." And she 
tore a corner from the wrapping paper, bor- 
rowed a lead-pencil From the man who sat in 
front of her, and very soon had dispatched her 
answer which was, that she would he pleased to 
go skating, and would he ready the next day 
at tliree o'clock. 



Aunt Matilda was not there and had sent her 
regrets in the morning that owing to an engage- 
ment for the afternoon she could not come. So 
Mrs. Neal had sent Tommy over with a basket 
of good things to his aunt who now sat enjoy- 
ing them and wondering why three o'clock 
would never come. 

Lat "r in the evening when Silas and Minnie 




Original Praiviiw I 



Tlie Christmas Turkey's Dream. 



| bit CfHirlotfr Morton. 



Silas had seen it all— the box cut down from 
the tree and at last in Aunt Matilda's arms, 
the very lady whose existence he had forgotten 
when he addressed it to Miss M. Neal. He 
thought terrible thoughts and frowned as he 
went over in his mind the half-day's work he 
had done visiting the greenhouse and confec- 
tioner, of how he had arranged it with such 
care, and— perhaps he thought of the cost. 

Aunt Matilda was very happy, and smiled 
graciously as she left the school house the very 
first one with her precious box under her arm. 
She never waited to speak to people and had 
often said that, "for her part she never could 
see no sense in parleying around when it was 
time to go home." Minnie soothed with kind 
words the wrath of the disappointed Silas as 
they rode slowly homeward, and told him the 
intention was always the best part of any gift, 
and that she felt almost sure her aunt would dis- 
cover the mistake and all would turn out well. 

But Silas was not quite himself, again until 
seated the next day at Mrs. Neal's loaded din- 
ner table. All were so happy that be forgot 
his anger and was among the merriest. 



had sufficiently recovered from the big dinner 
and were wandering over the hills in the direc- 
tion of the pond, they suddenly stopped, almost 
convulsed with laughter, for in the distance 
skating were Simon Bailey, the bachelor 
blacksmith, and Aunt Matilda Neal. It was a 
laughable sight as neither had been on the ice 
for years. They stumbled and fell, their skates 
came off and Aunt Matilda declared, that it 
looked easy for some but she couldn't make 
out where the fun was. Silas and Minnie 
hastily retraced their steps, lest their presence 
should be detected and the fun spoiled. 

Another Christmas Day came round. Aunt 
Matilda no longer lived at the foot of the hill, 
but kept a neat home and made good bread for 
the industrious blacksmith, Simon Bailey. 

Silas and Minnie are still the best of friends, 
and his Christmas box this year was plainly 
addressed to Miss Minnie Neal. and reached its 
rightful owner. Silas graduates next June 
and intends to begin practice in the home town 
with Minnie as Ids partner. 

Unheedful vows may heedfully be broken. 



198 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Floor Plans of the Y.M.C.A. 




We are presenting on these pages the floor plans of the Y. M. C. A. building that is to be 
erected at the College in the near future. The plans were made by Holland & Squires, of To- 
peka. The Y. M. C. A. building will fill a lon^-ftdt want in the life of the students in providing 
a gymnasium. Every one should make a careful study of these plans. Become interested in the 




•uuan 



HBB 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



199 



Building, Kansas State Agricultural College. 




i 




building movement. Help it along by talking, giving, planning. Some of you may not reap any 
direct benefits in getting to use the building, but will have the satisfaction of having helped a 
good cause along. 







200 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LtTCvenv 
0« Cultivate Hi* 
Own Gc'ntO. •-!-• 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-oinee at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, tive cents. 



F. A. Kiene. ,Tn,,'06,. Editor-in-chief 

(iROTBit Kahl.'O" Business Manager 

EL 0. Pahhak. 07 Literary Editor 

L. E. (Jaston/iw Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. (W Exchange Editor 

C. E. WnmAW Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. 07 Subscription Manager 

Orack Hawkins. "OH ' .„„ „ r _ ,,,,,.. _, 

A. G. Phillips, W f Assoc ' ljOCiU ™ itors 

Elizabeth Swkkt, Ol..., Alumni Editor 

Jab. R. Coxen. 'oh Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions and inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not lute- 1 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means tluit your snbscrip- 
tlon is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Eliza both Sweet, "oi. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan,. Dec. 21, IftOo. 






The Herald extends to all its readers very 
best wishes for a merry Christmas and a happy 
New Year. 



With to-morrow noon another term of work 
at K. S. A. C. passes from the realm of *'is" 
to that of "was," How well we have lived, 
how honestly we have faced our duties and how 
thoroughly we have entered into the spirit of 
our work is a matter for individual examin- 
ation. Certain it is that every one of us are 
short of the highest mark of excellence hut this 
should not discourage us. If we have honestly 
endeavored to make the most of our opportun- 
ities, in that degree have we been successful 
and in greater degree will success be ours in 
the future because of this indeavor. For it is 
with exercise of our ability that new talents 
develop. If we have fallen short and realize 
this, we still have the satisfaction of knowing 
that by hard work we may retrieve the past in 
some measure and improve the future where we 
are prone to blunder. Here are best wishes 



for a successful close of this term's work and 
for a succeeding term full of the satisfaction 
and pleasure of good deeds well done. 



This issue of the Hekald is graced by a 
design, the work of one of our College students. 
For this we a re duly thankful and we s h all be 
glad to receive more contributions of the kind. 
When anything out of the ordinary happens 
about College a cartoon will illustrate the 
different points to good advantage, and in a 
school with an art department such as onrs 
and the number of students attending there 
should he no lack of designs and illustrations 
for all occasions. Even if not accepted, this 
work would give good practice to all students 
with an artistic turn of mind. To insure in- 
sertion in any edition, the cartoon should be 
in the hands of the editor at least one week 
previous to the issue, as some time is required 
in preparing it. 

fn this, the last issue of the term, we con- 
sider ourselves privileged to look back over 
the season and to criticise and commend as we 
review. The students who have gathered here 
this fall are, as a rule, farther advanced in 
College work, quicker to take up with new 
ideas, and more enthusiastic in everything that 
pertains to College life. Tn all the student 
doings they have been more willing to forget 
self and to pull with the rest for the general 
good of all. Our athletic season has been the 
most successful ever recorded here, and no 
further word is necessary than that it could 
not have been so had not every one done his or 
her little part toward making it a success. 
The literary society work has been generally 
pleasing, but it is our belief that we all fall 
somewhat short as society members. A little 
more diligence in our society work will ma- 
terially advance the standing of the organiza- 
tions. It is our belief that the work in oratory 
this fall has been somewhat short of that of 
previous years, indicating that our contest will 
be less interesting than in the past. If such is 
the case, we cannot begin too quickly to 
remedy it. The social life of the College is, in 
our opinion, more pleasing than ever before. 
Parties and receptions have heen of frequent 
occurrence, and a spirit of good will and fel- 
lowship seems to be in the very atmosphere. 
Concluding, in our demonstrations we have 
been enthusiastic, but occasionally somewhat 
thoughtless. Of course, in a crowd of several 
hundred young men who are backing up a class 
or a college, thoughtless words are sure to be 
spoken and shady things done. But the bad 
effect would not be apparent if it were not for 



a : 



ST 






mae*rt 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



201 



the general practice of following the example 
with something a little better or worse. Our 
class and College yells and demonstrations 
should arise from genuine feeling, with spon- 
taneity, and not from a desire to do as others 
are doing or to outdo them. In fact, in all our 
relations we should show our individuality 
rather than make of ourselves a mere sham or 
imitation, thinking that this is more pleasing 
to those about us. 



3C Knockers' Corner 3£ 



tonians. 

Society was called to order by Vice-president 
Laura Lyman, in the Auditorium. 

In place of the program we held our pre- 
liminary oratorical contest and as a result 
Miss Marcia Turner was elected as our repre- 
sentative. 

This being our last session for the term, 
officers were nominated for next and, after 
transacting other important business, society 
adjourned. 

Why to true merit should they have regard'' 
They know that virtue is its own reward. 
-Gay. 

"Auto-Obituary.*' 

We're not quite dead but we're going fast 
and before this reaches the public we will be 
out of "biz." This does not refer to the A. 
B's.— they're always alive— but to their humble 
correspondent who is in the throes of his last 
spasm and must soon pass from the lists. 
Before we go we wish to record again that 
"the A. B's met as usual in their hall Satur- 
day afternoon." They sang, and were led in 
devotion by Skinner: they listened patiently 
to long discussions of various schools of the 
State by various members of the society and to 
the "Gleaner" by other members; and they 
ragged in the business session after the fashion 
of A. B's. 

Mr. Larimer and Miss Harold, from outside 
the society, furnished music, and W. W. Smith 
also rendered several pleasing selections by 
proxy, the "proxy" being a "Victor" talking 
machine. 

In closing we wish to say, as we said in the 
beginning (only different), that, all things 
considered, the members feel that in true 
society spirit, good will to each other and to 
other societies, and in honest hard work, the 
term has been a profitable one. 

With these brief remarks we make our exit 
and yield our " Johann Faber, No. 3" to our 
successor. F * A * ^ 

The most valuable result of education is the 
ability to make yourself do the thing you ought 
to do when it ought to be done, whether you like 
to do it or not.— Huxley. 



One day last week there might have been 
seen in the alcoves of the library two students 
who were deliberately misplacing the books on 
the library shelves. The librarians were not 
near at the time and these two gentlemen ( ? ) 
busied themselves in thoroughly mixing the 
books of one of the south alcoves. Then, 
putting on an innocent look, they walked to 
another part of the building and began read- 
ing a book as if nothing had been done. To 
any one that knows with what care the libra- 
rians arrange and classify these books, this 
little bit of mischief becomes a piece of vandal- 
ism. The misplacing of books by accident or 
thoughtlessness makes enough trouble for them 
without the annoyance of Ivaving the books 
disarranged by a person whose only motive in 
doing the act is simply "meanness." Shame 
on you, fellows! Cut it out. 



Perhaps we could not devise a better schedule 
for the junior electrical engineers, but we 
would like to register a knock right here on 
the arrangement of classes. A junior, if he is 
exactly up with the course, can get a respect- 
able assignment, otherwise he has a poor 
chance to graduate with the class. As it is 
now, physics laboratory is given only at the 
third and fourth hours alternate days, instead 
of the afternoon, when it should be given. If a 
junior is back German or Kinematics there is 
absolutely no opportunity to make them up. 
In making out the time schedule it seems 
that some thought should be given to the ac- 
commodation of the student and not cater to 
the instructor fully. 

Y. M. C. A. Notes. 

Plan to go to the Nashville conference, Feb- 
ruary 28. 

Former-President Cunningham was shaking 
hands with the boys Sunday. 

The State conference will be held at Chanute 
this year. We should be well represented. 

State Secretary Baird, of the Y. M. C. A. , 
spent Sunday with us. He gave a short talk 
on the Japan work of the State of Kansas at 
the afternoon meeting. 

The meeting Sunday afternoon was well at- 
tended. Reverend Gelvin's address on "Why 
I believe in Missions" was of the kind that 
helps. He gave as his reason for believing in 
missions, "Because I believe in Jesus Christ." 
$31.50 was subscribed for missions at this 
meeting. 



202 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Eurodelphian Society* 

Society was called to order by President Dal- 
ton. The first number on the program was a 
vocal solo by Curt Smith, who responded to an 
encore. Bo line Hanson then conducted the 
"quiz" box. Miss Nieolet favored us with a 
piano solo. The next number was a " jungle 
trio" given by Helen Huse. Lulu Rannels and 
Tillie Harold. Mrs. (Butler) Taylor, an ex- 
"Euro," then gave a piano solo. The debate, 
" Resolved, That the game of football is not 
physically beneficial,'' was very interesting: 
the speakers were: affirmative, Marie Coons 
and Adah Lewis: negative, Fannie Johnson 
and Arthie Ed worthy. Ruth Elliot then gave 
a piano solo. The "Delphi" was read by 
Jessie Marty. After a lively business session 
and the nomination of officers for next term, 
we adjourned. t. h. 

A. B. Alumni Association. 

The association of Alpha Beta Alumni was 
very pleasantly entertained last week by Mr. 
A. N. H. Beeman at the home of Mrs. Clara 
Westgate. The talk on Russia, which Mrs. 
Huse was unable to give at our last meeting, 
was the leading feature of the program. Mrs. 
Huse made the talk both instructive and enter- 
taining, telling much of the history of the 
Russians, and many anecdotes of Peter the 
Great and his court. Miss Helen Westgate 
and Mr. Beeman rendered some very pretty 
music on the guitar and harp. 

The social hour was quite hilarious, owing 
to the supply of funny stories at hand, and the 
bundle shower for the host was much appre- 
ciated— by the guests. 

Delicious refreshments were served, and the 
evening was closed by a vote of thanks to Mrs. 
Westgate and her daughter for the kindness 
and cordiality shown us. 

Mr. A. E. Ridenour has invited the Asso- 
ciation to meet with him, at 623 Manhattan 
Avenue, for the next meeting, Monday even- 
ing, January 8, 1906. j. p. 



Websters. 

Few but loyal were the Websters that met in 
South Society Hall last Saturday night. Al- 
though the audience was small, a good pro- 
gram was rendered. A. B. Cron introduced 
Miss Nieolet who favored us with some fine 
music, after which Ross Sweet read an original 
story. Ross can deliver the goods when it 
comes to writing stories. Sol. Cunningham 
then showed us how freshmen fail to get out of 
drill. J. W. Blachly's music, furnished by 
Mr. and Mrs. Hutto, was appreciated very 
much by the society. W. M. Putman illus- 



trated how he worked the railroad agents. 
This was followed by M. R. Shuler's oration. 
You will hear of him again next month. A 
burlesque by W. A. Conner was worth the price 
of admission alone. Miss Flannery .furnished 
Gripton's music which was good. Now came 
the M Reporter" by Fred" Caldwell. This was 
the "real article" as you all know Fred is 
noted for his wit and wisdom. "Capt." 
Walker then criticised the society. 

* ' B ANTY. » ' 

tiamp. Creek Christmas Tree. 

A very large crowd from Colville attended 
the Christmas tree at Hamps. Creek school- 
house last Saturday night. The program was 
amusing and each one of Miss Rosaline 
Greene's scholars deserves credit for the en- 
tertainment, especially those in the chart class, 
consisting of Master Charley Bassler, little 
Clara Whipple, Master Albert Pincomb, Mas- 
ter Marshal Elsas and little Bertha Wilber. 
Shortly after the program closed the jingling 
of sleigh bells was heard, and Santa Claus 
soon made his appearance and helped dis- 
tribute the presents. The tree was loaded 
down with presents for the children and the 
parents of the district. After the distribution 
of presents the school presented its teacher, 
Miss Greene, with a beautiful gold watch and 
chain. 

Exchanges 

Football reform is now the cry. 
'•Half a loaf is better than none," but some 
men prefer to loaf all the time. —Ex. 

Washburn has decided to debate the negative 
side of the question in the debate with Baker. 
-Ex. 

"My instructor in English told me not to say 
'haircut/" "How's that?" "He said it was 
barber i sm. ■''—Ex. 

Pennsylvania takes the lead in following 
President Roosevelt's suggestion as to reform 
in football by sending a circular letter to all 
American colleges asking for reform. —Ex. 

The students in the department of forestry at 
N. IT. will have the opportunity to attend a 
special course of lectures on reserve manage- 
ment given by Mr. Charles A. Scott, super- 
visor to the federal forest reserves in Kansas 
and Nebraska. 

President Clark, of Clark University, takes 
the affirmative side of the "three-year course" 
question now being debated by eastern edu- 
cators. Among the "hindrances that militate 
now so effectually against intellectual attain- 
ment, ' ' Dr. Clark emphasizes in particular uni- 
versity athletics.— Ex. 






THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



20$ 




Sitfh and the world sitrhs with you. 

Lauirh and you laujrh alone. 
For its mostly the rule, that each duvnert fool 

Can't see any joke hut his own.- S% 



The P'arm Department shredded corn. last 
week. 

J. W. F. Hughes, of Topeka. visited his son 
last week, 

Minnie Ise does not expect to return to Col- 
lege next term. 

What will happen to the pies that mother 
makes, next weekV 

Professor Dickens had an addition to his 
barn built last week. 

H. Bales was showing an uncle around Col- 
lege one day last week. 

Ten girls of the D. S. short course organ- 
ized a sorority, last week. 

Jesse George received a large box of pecans 
from his sisters in Oklahoma, last week. 

Assistant Ahearn spent Monday down town, 
decorating for the O'Daniel-Springer wedding. 

Make your father a Christinas present of the 
Kansas Agricultural Revietr. Special price 2o 
cents. 

The Methodists expect to hold revival meet- 
ings beginning January 7, to last about three 
weeks. 

Charles F. Smith. '0*2, and Charlotte 
{ Berkey ) Smith, '00, are the parents of a new 
daughter. 

A H. Lupfer, representee from Pawnee 
county, visited his son James last Friday and 
Saturday. 

Miss Cecilia Augspurger was called home 
last week on account of the serious illness of 
her father. 

Bun Thurston is usually pressed for time 
when the Y. W. and Y. M. cabinets meet on the 
same night. 

The three Broom brothers were called home 
last week on account of the death of their 
mother at Verdi, Kan. 

If you want work during the holidays see the 
business manager of the Agricultural Review. 
It will be worth while. 

Tom White and Bugler Hughes had a mix-up 
one night recently. Considerable excitement 
and no*damage was the result. 

Assistant Jackson rendered a cornet solo at 
the Baptist church, Sunday morning. 1 he 
music was of his own composition. 



Invitations are out for the marriage of 
Frank Hillyer, student in '04, now of Kansas 
City, and Miss Eva Royer, of lola. 

The big ventilating fan in the basement of 
Physical Science Hall has been put in working 
order and is in service these cold mornings. 

The supply of College catalogues being ex- 
hausted, an "abridged" catalogue was pub- 
lished last week by the Printing Department. 

The seniors have challenged the juniors to a 
game of "shinny" to be played in the hereafter. 
The sophs, wonder if either class will have ice 
at that time. 

Dr. N. S. Mayo had an article in last week's 
NnthiHtlfct, describing a Cuban election. From 
what he said we judge that an election thereis 
no laughing matter. 

Cards are out announcing the marriage of 
Marian Allen, '04, and T. W. Buell, '04, 
Monday evening. January 1, 1JMW, at the home 
of the bride in Manhattan. They will be at 
home after January 1"> at Roanoke, Texas. 

The collection of minerals belonging to the 
Chemistry Department was moved from the 
basement of the physics building to the first 
floor last Monday. Few students have seen or 
know of this ceil lection, which is large and 
valuable. 

Captain Shaffer and the commissioned 
officers tried to have a group picture taken last 
Friday, after dress parade, but the machine 
could not stand the strain and another attempt 
was made Monday. The result of this trial is 
not known. 

Washburn and Fairmount will play a game 
of football at Wichita during the Christinas 
vacation. They will play under new rules, 
some of which are: Ten yards must be gained 
in four downs or possession of the ball is for- 
feited. There will be two referees, either of 
whom may summarily remove any player using 
unnecessary roughness. There will be no 
touch-down's, but all scores must be made from 
the field. 

A crowd of sixteen students, accompanied by 
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Cooper, drove out south of 
Prospect last Saturday evening. After supper 
they gathered around a large fire, roasted 
marshmallows, told stories and had a good 
time generally until about ten o'clock, when 
they drove back to town. Sandwiches and 
coffee were served at the candy kitchen, after 
which they were entertained for an hour or sc- 
at the Cooper home. 

The "Vet." brigade under Surgeon-general 
Cassel had a battle with the regular troops 
under Colonel Withington one day last week. 
The "Vets." advanced under cover and, after 
a short skirmish, captured an outpost (pine), 
a prisoner, and a Springfield rifle. Withing- 
ton thereupon ordered out the reserves, who 
charged with fixed bayonets. The "Vets." 
stood their ground for a few moments and then 
fled, closely pursued by the regulars. The 
only serious damage was a bayonet stab in the 
west side of Corporal Cheney's trousers and 
the loss of Harrison's voice for a few minutes. 
Private Groom did valiant service in covering 
the retreat. 



204 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



Some people rejoice at another person's suc- 
cess. 

F. W. Grabendyke is clerking in Elliot's 
clothing store during: his spare time these days, 

Ray Singleton has been compelled to leave 
College on account of illness. 

Miss Mareia Turner will represent the fonians 
in the coming oratorical contest. 

President Nichols was out on the Central 
Branch special four days last week. 

When you want anything in College text- 
books and supplies, stop at the Coops. 

The dairy laboratory boys had to go out in 
the cold Monday forenoon and judge dairy 
cows. 

Assistant Wheeler left Monday noon for 
Chicago. He will attend the Stock Show while 
there. 

Mr. Foster, of Bennington, Kan., visited bis 
son and daughters Sunday and returned home 
Monday. 

Miss Eleanor Nygard, freshman, has left 
College for the remainder of this term on ac- 
count of sickness. 

Professor MeKeever's brother, G. V. Me- 
Keever, wife and son. of Valley Falls, visited 
in Manhattan last week. 

The third number of the C. D. B. lecture 
course will be given at the Congregational 
church, Thursday night. 

Fred Lindsey, T. F. White and a number of 
others will spend their Christmas vacation in 
making up back industrials. 

The class in pomology has been scoring 
apples this week. Some of the apples were 
unable to stand the wear and vanished. 

Professor Me Keever went to K. U. , Monday, 
and told the future journalists all about the 
"Psychological Aspect of the Newspaper." 

Mr. Strom, of Dwight, Kan., visited with the 
Messrs. Oman a few days last week. He made 
the trip down on his wheel in three hours' 
time. 

. Several students will make experiments in 
making paint out of milk and cement this 
week. Assistant Melick will superintend the 
work. 

O. B. Whipple, J 04, told the Herald this 
week that he could "live without the Jay- 
hawker," but then you know he always was a 
knocker. 

Before purchasing your books for the winter 
term remember that it will be profitable for you 
to be a stockholder in the Cooperative Asso- 
ciation. 

Students who have pay for work due them 
from the College and who do not expect to 
work any more this month may get it by call- 
ing at the secretary's office. 

L. W. Lawson, the Hamp. Santa Claus, was 
remembered by his friends at the Christmas 
tree Saturday evening. His old clothing, hats 
and shoes appeared in great abundance and 
for a time the happy smile left "Swuds" face. 



Prof. J. F. Lovewell, secretary of the Kansas 
Academy of Science, was here Monday, learn- 
ing how to make nitrogen determinations. 
Assistant Shaw showed him around. 

Professor and Mrs. Willard entertained 
Misses Monsch, Loomis and Melton, and in- 
structors in the Chemistry Department at 
dinner, Saturday evening, December 16. 

Assistants Wood, Mathewson and Watkins 
spent Monday forenoon in packing away a 
consignment of glass apparatus that was 
received by the Chemistry Department last 
week. 

The Trans-Missouri Freight Bureau has 
granted one-half rates on seed and grain from 
Manhattan, Hays, or MePherson to points in 
Kansas when the grain or seed is to be used 
for seeding purposes. 

About two hundred guests attended the junior 
short-course reception, given at the D. S,, 
Saturday afternoon. All agreed that the short- 
course girls have thoroughly mastered at least 
part of the culinary art. 

The State Teachers' Association will meet in 
Topeka Christmas week. Professor Valley 
will sing a solo. President Nichols will give 
an address on "Agricultural Education" and 
Miss Rose will lead during a discussion. 

The Association of Alpha Beta Alumni met 
Tuesday evening. December 12, at the home of 
Mrs. Westgate. After a short program, a gen- 
eral "ragchewing" was indulged in. A. N. H. 
Beeman, '05, sang a solo. Refreshments were 
served at a late hour, after which the members 
departed. 

R. H. Shaw, who has been assistant chemist 
in the experiment station for the past three 
years, has resigned his position and accepted 
an assistant professorship at the State Experi- 
ment Station of the University of Nebraska. 
He will take up his new duties January 1. Be- 
sides the raise in salary he will be second pro- 
fessor of chemistry. 

In the past season twenty players lost their 
lives due directly to injuries received on the 
gridiron. Of this numl>er only three were college 
men. The most conservative estimate of the 
number of college men playing the game would 
reach about 9,000, thus making the percentage of 
fatalities the very low figure of one thirtieth of 
one per cent. This, while it does not prove that 
there is no brutality in the game, does show 
that, relatively speaking, the game is far less 
dangerous than the innocent sports indulged 
in by the very persons who raise such a hue 
and cry against football.— Ex. 

The dairy and poultry special that was out 
on the Missouri Pacific railroad last week was 
a success in every way. From 200 to 800 peo- 
ple attended each session. Short contests in 
corn and poultry judging, also contests in 
butter scoring, were given at some of the stops. 
Prizes were given the winners. Prizes were 
also given for the best exhibits of poultry, 
corn, and butter. Those in charge of the work 
were : Assistant Melick, L. G. Humbarger, of 
the Blue Valley Creamery Co., St. Joseph, 
Mo., S. R. Young, Missouri-Pacific agricul- 
tural agent, and Major Sternberg, of Ells- 
worth. 



iS 



■ 



THE STUDENTS* HERALD. 



205 



5 




ONE-FOURTH 
OFF 



COONS 



Twenty-five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lay in a good supply now? Our Hand- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 






I 



Meet 
Our Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Largest Stock 
Shoes in City 



Julia Wendell, '06, expects to be in College 
next term, 

Coxen is having troubles of his own in col- 
lecting the football suits. 

John Calvin had a case of swell -he ad last 
week. A tooth caused it this time. 

As usual, the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

expect to meet new students and help them get 
located next term. 

Dr. Herbert Groom and Dr. A. F. Cassell, of 
the Veterinary Department, received their first 
pay for professional services last week. 

Wm. Hemphill, who has been grafting in 
western Kansas since last spring, returned 
Friday and will be in College next term. 

The Jayhawker has been purchased by Sarah 
Hougham, '03, and Alice Loomis, '04. They 
expect to make it a strictly alumni paper. 

The Garver football team was going to play 
the Coops, last Saturday but the latter "backed 
out" and the "last game of the season" was 
not played. 

Clyde Rickman and wife are the proud par- 
ents of a new son. The employees of the Print- 
ing Department were treated to a large bag of 
chocolates in honor of the occasion. 

Charles Willard went home "craw-fish style" 
last Thursday. When asked what was the 
matter, he appeared embarrassed and finally 
said he had unavoidably left a remnant of his 
trousers on an apple-tree limb. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



L. B. Pickett, '05, is working in the freight 
depot of the Burlington road at Lincoln, Nebr. 

Will Harold, electrical engineer '05, was 
here last week checking up instruments for the 
Lawrence plant. 

Jessie Sweet, '05, will be in from Glasco 
Saturday. She has been enjoying her work as 
schoolmistress for the past term. 

While at Wichita last week Professor 
Dickens met John Stingley, '04, who is travel- 
ing for the Moline Plow Company. 

J. C. Cunningham, '05, was in town the first 
of the week. He is traveling for the Crete 
Nursery Company, of Crete, Nebr. 

The many friends of Mamie Cunningham, 
'05, will be glad to hear that she is able to be 
back at her work in the schoolroom. 

A. I. Bain. '00, of Marysville. was around 
College last Wednesday. He was on his way 
to western Kansas to look up a new location. 

G. W. Skow ar.d W. D. Davis, '04, who are 
with the electrical department of the Santa Fe, 
visited the Tau Omega Sigma fraternity boys 
over Sunday. 

Ruth Mudge. '01, teacher of physiology and 
botany in the girls' high school, of Louisville, 
Ky., expects to spend the holidays at her home 
in Manhattan. 



HHM « *m i H« »»* « »»« M>M » m « »»M » « »« »»'" » « « «« « 



It's n ot what you make, it's what you save, and here is the chance to SAVE a t 

Knostman's Rebuilding Sale 

ALL SUITS AND OVERCOAS AT 
20 PER CENT OFF 



1 

Now is the time to buy your graduating suit— nothing reserved— pick it out now and 
pay when you come back in January. :: " £< 



■ 



.»»» » >»< « « 



m lt I Mimunltt - * I 



206 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



Gold Spectacles, Gold Pens, Best Fountain Pens, Souvenir Spoons, Sterling 
Silver Brushes and Gold Crosses. Leather goods are all the go. Books of all 
kinds. Music Rolls, We are selling at one-half price all Violins, Guitars, 
Mandolins, Acordions and Sheet Music. 



Diamond 

Rings 
Wedding 

Rings 
Band Rings 
Opal Rings 
Hundreds of 
Rings 



Gold Lockets 
Stick Pins 
Pine Chains 
Rich Charms 
Beautiful 

Pins 



Low 
Prices 



R. E. Lofinck 



OODd 

Goods 



DIAMONDS 
Best Silverware, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry 

1879 CHRISTMAS I0O5 

Every watch, piece of jewelry or silverware Is 
fully guaranteed. 



Elgin and 
Waltham 
Watches the 
finest In the' 
known world 
and very reas- 
onable, 
17.00 to $75.00 



Boss, Fahys 
and other 
good watch 
cases that are 
as reliable as 
gold dollars. 



I Toys of all kinds— Dolls, Express Wagons, Hobby Horses, Boys' and Girls' 
Sleds. All kinds of games— "Archarina," "Flinch" and "Worthwhile." We 
have many other things too numerous to mention. To appreciate your pur- 
chases, we have concluded to make free gifts as follows, which we present with 
each sale made at one time: :: :: :: :: :: :: » » ;» 

GIVEN AWAY 



Amt. of Sale Article given away Value 
$0 50 -Pencil or scratch-book, stick pin 5c 

1 00— Pearl hat pin, collar button, box stationery. 10c 

2 00— Any piece of jewelry or stick pin 20c 

8 00— Any piece of jewelry, china or glassware, 30c 

4 00— Any piece of Jewelry, china or book 40c 

5 00— Any piece jewelry, china, silverware, book, 50c 



Amt, of Sale Article given awuy Value 
$ 6 00— Any piece of jewelry, china or silverware 65c 

7 00— Any piece jewelry, china, silverware or book, 75c 

8 00— Any piece jewelry, china, silverware or book. 75c 

9 00— Any piece jewelry, silverware, china or book, 85c 
10 00— Any piece jewelry, silverware, china, book. *! 25 

and so on up to $50 00. 



M. G. Spalding, '06, is mail clerk on the 
Union Pacific train that runs into Wichita. 

Clara Spilman, instructor in domestic sci- 
ence, at the Christian Female Orphans' School 
at Camden Point, Mo., expects to be at home 
for the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Harlan, both of the 
class of '04, report from Honolulu under date 
of December 1 that they are enjoying a pleas- 
ant trip enroute to the Philippines. 

Dovie (Ulrich)Boys, '03, and W. A. Boys, 
'04, have sold their farm near Lee's Summit, 
Mo., and expect to locate in Kansas. Mrs. 
Boys will spend Christmas with her mother in 
Manhattan. 



Jay Worswick, '05, who has been clerking in 
Manhattan, has received a commission as third 
lieutenant in the Philippine constabulary. He 
will sail from San Francisco January 10. 

T. L. Pittman. '04, who is superintending the 
building of a plant for the Livingston Light 
and Power Company of Livingston, Mont., 
was in Manhattan a short time last week. He 
was on his way back from his home where he 
had been called by the death of his father. 

George Wolf, electrical engineer '05, writes 
that he has been promoted to the specification 
department of the Western Electric Company, 
Chicago. His work consists of preparing 
specifications for switch boards. He does not 
object to his shortened hours and increased pay. 



HOLIDAY GOODS 



i 



Our stock is larger than ever and prices are right. Look at our gift books, copyright 
books, boys' and girls' books, children's books, dolls, leather goods, toilet and manicure 
sets, military hair brushes, fancy goods, etc., before you buy. We can save you money. 
No nicer gift than a Waterman's Fountain Pen. We have them. 



I 



ANDERSON'S BOOKSTORE 



i 



'■— - 



*naa 



a 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



207 



17 



I 



71 



Remember, that the old Reliable^ 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



i 



Is the place to buy your Christ- 
mas Boxes and all kinds of 
Christmas Candies. 



I 



I 



Largest Line of Boxes, Besl and Sweetesl Candies 

PRICES RIGHT 



I 



U 



mm—n 



J 



r 



Right Shoulder, Armsl 



Forward, MarchI 



to the 



Students' Co-operative Bookstore 

To see the finest line of stationery in town — either tablet or box 
form. Everything along 1 College supplies we have or can get at 

your order. 

CHAS. S. JONES, Manager - 

V ■ ■ ■'" w— ^ 



Manhattan 



Electric-Lighted & Heated Buses & Hacks 
Day and Night Baggage Line 



Transfer 



Meet all trains day or night. LARUE 
WAGONETTS and PARK PHAE- 
TONS suitable for class parties etc. 
Let us call your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a specialty. 



Line 



H. J. Barnhouse L. W. Phillips 



> 



208 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Two blocks from College gate. Gives better meals 
for the money than any club in town. Every 
cent paid in goes for the expenses of the Club. 
Engage your board at the College bookstore. 



Conwell, 



Steward. 



AMOS 

HIGH 

CLASS 

PHOTOS 

227 Poyntz Avenue 




Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
1NE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



-it is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 



Special Rates to Students 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 



BOYLE & BELL, Props 



EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Photic 74 



Qppn<s THAT 

\JLJLjLJO grow 

Elevator on C R, I. fir P. Ry, 

Geo- T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113-15 N. Second St. 



Phone 67. 



H. H. Bates, flgr. 



Kings 



Fountain Drinks 

Ice-Cream 



Home-made 
Candies 



We Lead, 

Others Follow 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 



THE HERALD 



$1 PER YEAR. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and 
General Seasonable Goods 
Lawn Mowers and Gas Stoves 
Cleaned and Repaired 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



Buy Your 
Separator 

NOW 



« 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. f If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
*J Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. <f Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal fits. 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
9 iHifl 11 Uruniin Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

75 and 77 Yurli Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 MeDermet Avenue 






ftS^^^I§S£S^^^Ss^^!fe^$ 



THE STAR GROCERY CO. 

======= JOHN PURCELL: = 



Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries 

327 POYNTZ AVE. 



Telephone No. 34. 



W e PeHve r G oo ds Pr o mptly 
to Any Part of the City .... 



G&ZZGG&SG&VS&mO&SC&yZC^ 



College Campus Restaurant 



1 



FIRST-CLASS BOARD 

Meals and Lunches, Short Orders 
...Oysters, Sodas, and Confections... 



GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors 

l OQCOO O QOO O O OOOOOOaO OO OOO O l 






»»>»y»»»»»»m»tttttt*»tt*tt»*tttt***H**»^ 



x 



S 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
yean enable* u* to meet their wants exactly. X X 



X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN. KAN. 



**********V***^^^ 



MA 



Since Santa Claus gave away the Books and Candy to the Children at our Store Saturday 

THIS STORE IS N O T | 
GIVING AWAY ANYT HING % 

\ ! • £ 

BUT WE ARE GIVING YOU BIG VALUE FOR YOUR MONEY IN 2 
every article of Holiday Goods you buy at the Big Racket. Remember we yg 
make it our Special Business to handle the Holiday Trade; we buy Toys, 
Dolls, Celluloid Goods, Toilet Cases, Manicure Sets, Comb and Brush Sets, 
Fancy China, Art Pottery, Novelties, etc. direct from the Factory and the 
Importer, and in large quantities. This means that you can buy from us 
with confidence that you are getting the Best Assortment and most Desir- 
able Goods to select from, and the Lowest Possible Prices. As usual at 
this time, we ask all who can to come in the morning, as this store is always 
crowded in the afternoon. 



[toe BIG RACKET H 



* 

* 



\ 



\ 



I 



%\vc Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X 





■ 



-t 



I 



i 



. 



■ 



I ; 



■ - 

1 

■ 



§m m* 



. f 



I 



;i:::c::..; 



i 



Keuffel & Esser Co. 



# OF 5 N 

813 Locust Street, 



YORK * 

Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 
INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS UmJ. 

500-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 







E. L. Askren 

Jeweler and 
Optician 



Graduated optician. Spectacles scientifically 
fitted. Fine watch and jewelry repairing a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 



Manhattan 

Kansas 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable (or class 
parties, etc. Charges 
moderate, X> 



Phone 



226 



—a 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



209 



II If you want a 

picture of the K, 

S, A, G Football 
team order now, 
at Wolf's Studio, 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



E B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



219 Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles, Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. 

Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, fine line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. ' En- 
dorsed by all railway' officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

StX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P, C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 

FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Wait for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

fl. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 

offer you only the best, X, X 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO, 



210 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Wishing the Students, Faculty, and all connected with the K S. 
A. C. a HAPPY NEW YEAR we solicit your trade and hope by our 
low prices, good treatment, and prompt delivery to get our share of 
it. In our five stores under one roof you will find a large assort- 
ment of seasonable goods to select from at the lowest prices. We 
will have to offer THIS MONTH MANY BARGAINS. We would 
be pleased to have you call and see what we are offering. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms up stairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Students 

WE WILL SELL YOU A $15 
UNIFORM FOR $12 AND 



Don't 

Forget 

Our Large stock of 

FULL VAMP 

at cash prices. X 



Moore Bros. & Go. 



STUDENTS 

Get your WOOD of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

PHONE 6 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 

70S N, THIRD ST. 



S. N. Higinbotham 

DEALXR IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



PROFESSIONAL. 
DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST, 



Rooms 3 and 4 in TJnfon National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Office In Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. Office Phone 307 




publishco 
Each Thursday By 
Jhc Students Or The: 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Mouo:LetEvejy0ncGaltivateHi3 OwxiQerfttxs, 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan,, January 11, 1906. 



Number 16 



Nates on the Institute of Technology 

A letter from W. P. Terrell. '04 
The institute of Technology is situated in the 
Back Bay district of Boston. The Boston* 
Commons is about five minutes' walk to the 
north, and the historic Charles river is as near 
on the west. The public library and the museum 
of tine arts are close by. There is no campus 
around the buildings. Around two of the build- 
ing's is a lawn. 

The new student generally calls first upon the 
Dean. A member of the instructing staff is ap- 
pointed as an adviser of the student. A grad- 
uate student from another college sees the in- 
structors in charge of the courses from which 
he wishes to be excused before he is ready to 
register. It is not necessary, to go before a 
member of the assignment committee to be able 
to enter a class. Each student does this either 
with the help of his adviser, or by himself. This 
is a simple matter if the student is regular in 
his work. If he is not, a great deal of time 
must be spent in fixing the attendance card so 
that it will pass the faculty. The amount of 
work that can be taken for a term of fifteen 
weeks is seven hundred twenty hours. This in- 
cludes lectures, recitations, and preparations. 
Any work above this amount can be carried if 
the faculty allows it, after a petition has been 
made to it. Sometimes the faculty will add 
courses to the attendance card or take away 
courses. When registration material is handed 
in, a card is given to the student to show that 
he has registered. A bulletin is issued inform- 
ing the students what books to get and what 
will be the lessons at the first exercise. 

On account of the large classes, the instruct- 
ing is principally by lecturing. Original prob- 
lems are handed out from time to time that are 
supposed to be solved independently. By some 
instructors these problems are considered as 



important as the rest of the work. Many a 
student has escaped a condition in a course on 
account of his problems. In most of the flrst- 
and second-year subjects, examinations are 
held once every five weeks. Reports are sent to 
the parents or guardians of those under age. 
It is just before the semi-annual and the annual 
examinations that most of the "cramming," or 
' 'plugging, " as it is called here, isdone. There 
is a mark other than an "F," which means a 
flunk, that the students try to avoid, and that 
is a "D," which means "deficient," This does 
not mean that your work is poor. In fact, your 
work may be very good. A deficient mark is 
gotten when the required amount of work is not 
done, and then by student taking some drawing 
or laboratory work. It comes from "cutting" 
the exercises or from wasting time by talking. 
This mark can be removed within a specified 
time. The highest mark is a "C," which means 
a credit. Absences have an effect on the 
student's standing, otherwise it does not make 
much difference whether you are present or not. 

It is amusing to hear a group of students 
from other colleges talking about how differ- 
ent things are from what they were at their 
old school. I suppose it is human for students 
to say that the instructors are putting too much 
work upon them. As an excuse for a poor 
lesson in languages many will say that they 
did not come here to learn to talk foreign lan- 
guages. 

During the year there has been less than six 
convocations or chapel exercises. The first 
was at the beginning of the school year, when 
the president addressed us. In the others we 
were addressed by some noted American. 
There is no music, and the instructors sit 
among the students. It is well to arrive before 
the appointed time in order to get a seat. The 
classes group themselves. The hall resounds 




212 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



with class yells, the Institute yells and witti- 
cisms until the president and the speaker make 
their appearance, when all rise. The instruct- 
ors are made to bear many jokes. This is the 
only time the students have a chance to even 
up things. The address lasts only thirty min- 
utes. 

Every Christmas the president and his wife 
have a Christmas tree for those who remain 
here during the holidays. A short program is 
rendered, then the presents are distributed. 
After the presents are distributed refreshments 
are served. 

Students are here from all parts of the world. 
The Chinese and Japanese are sent here by 
their respective governments. 

There are thirteen different courses. It is 
sometimes the case that a student does not know 
every one in his course until his last year. 
I suppose this is one of the causes of the 
lack of college spirit. There are no dor- 
mitories, and some students live thirty and 
forty miles away. The fraternities bring a few 
together. There are fifteen fraternities having 
chapters here, with a great number of others 
represented. But they do not keep the main stu- 
dent body together. It appears that the men 
who take an active part in student life are '"fra- 
ternity" men. There are two societies which 
partake of a literary nature. 

The "Technology Club" has for its object 
the welfare of the Institute and the promotion 
of the social interests of the students. Only a 
limited number of undergraduates can become 
members. 

The students are under no rules. They smoke 
their pipes on the steps of the main building or 
drink their liquid refreshment a little stronger 
than cider at any time. The Y. M. C. A. is 
here, but its influence is not felt. The "Kom- 
raers" are every Saturday evening. A number 
of students take in the shows Saturday night. 

Those who most need gymnasium work seldom 
take it, as it is not compulsory. There is 
neither an Institute football eleven or baseball 
team, although the classes sometimes have them. 

In the fall the sophomores and freshmen 
have a meet. Besides the track events, there is 
a tug-of-war and a football game. An interclass 
meet is held in the winter, and also in the spring. 
A dual meet is held with some other col- 
lege in the spring. Cross-country runs are held 
every Saturday afternoon. Numerals and let- 
ters are given in the different meets. They are 
much sought after by the students. Letters are 
also given to the gymnastic team and the 
basket-ball team. 

Great interest is taken in tennis and fencing. 
Although not admitted to. the association of 



colleges, the institute team won every fencing 
meet in which it participated this year. 

The students have the same dislike for drill, 
although they get only a year of it, and once a 
week at that. They drill in an armory of the 
state militia. The officers are selected from the 
men after a few weeks' drill. Those who have 
had drill before stand the best show. 

Two college papers are published by the stu- 
dents. One is published three times a week and 
makes known the happenings about the Insti- 
tute and the faculty notices; the other is a mag- 
azine and is published monthly. The Juniors 
issue a class book called the Technique. The 
first twenty-five are signed by the president. 
For these there is a rush. A student will have 
his money refunded if he gets one of the first 
five. 

The institute is not without its play. The 
parts are written by the students, and are prin- 
cipally singing and spectacular dancing. 

The event which many students look forward 
to for many months is the junior "prom." As 
the name indicates, this is in the hands of the 
juniors. The amount of money expended 
amounts to quite a sum. The "Technique" 
rush, the "Tech." show and the junior "prom." 
take place in junior week, generally the last 
week in April. The faculty gives three days 
vacation to the students. 

On commencement day a thesis in each course 
is read. On class day, after the exercises, a 
spread is had on the lawn. After the degrees 
have been received the classes have dinners. 
After the dinners, all march to Rodger Build- 
ing, which all students and alumni revere and 
cheer. 

Websters. 

Instinctively, as usual, we met in our hall 
last Saturday night to elect our "high mucky- 
mucks" for the ensuing term. The attendence, 
while only about eighty-nine per cent, showed 
one hundred one per cent of aspirants for 
office. 

After roll-call, and prayer by Snodgrass, 
Kiene opened the polls and we got busy. The 
way Websters' merits and demerits were 
brought to light was not only surprising but 
shocking. Jesse George was accused of grand 
larceny and it was proven beyond a doubt that 
Conwell really did pass calculus. However, 
we managed to elect the following officers : 
"Prexy," C. B. Kirk; vice "prexy," W. A. 
Conner; recording secretary, H. H. Conwell; 
corresponding secretary, L. M. Jorgenson; 
treasurer, J. E. George; critic, Sol. Cunning- 
ham; marshal, "Banty;" members of program 
committee, F. A. Kiene, P. W. Winter, J. W. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



213 



Blachly; members of board of directors, W. 
M. Putraan, Irwin Harold, Charles Gilkison. 
The work at the polls had warmed our blood 
so we arranged for a "civil feud," with Kiene 
and Walker as leaders of the opposing 1 sides. 
General Kiene showed some skill in his choice 
of men while Colonel Walker also showed 
good judgment. The battle will take place 
about March 1. While there is not much doubt 
that Kiene's heavy artillery will win, Walker's 
fast men will perhaps give some trouble. The 
stake is a grand oyster supper for the winners. 
Watch the smoke fly and hear the cannon 
roar. Wah ! Haw I Wah ! L. M. J. 



Eurodelphian Society. 

Society was called to order at 2:45 by Presi- 
dent Dalton. After roll-call and the reading 
of the minutes of the last m Beting, the follow- 
ing officers were elected and installed for this 
term: President, Boline Hanson; vice-presi- 
dent, Tillie Harold ; secretary, Fannie John- 
son ; corresponding secretary, Eleanor March ; 
treasurer, Grace Smith: marshal, Ella Myers; 
critic, Arthie Ed worthy. 

Short business session and adjournment. 



Football Players Get Sweaters. 

The last of the many good deeds done for 
football by the Rooter's Club came to light 
last Saturday when fourteen first-team men 
received handsome white vest- sweaters as a 
gift of the Club. Coach Ahearn presided at 
the meeting, and after thanking the Club for 
the work of the past season he introduced 
Prof. J. O. Hamilton. In a few words Pro- 
fessor Hamilton reviewed the season, calling 
it the most successful in the history of the 
College. The sweaters were then given out. 
The College monogram, K A, which is given 
to men who have taken part in six first-team 
games, was given, in addition to the sweaters, 
to the following men: Scholz, Mallon, Kirk, 
Walker, Blake, Nystrom, Whipple, Cunning- 
ham, Ostlund, Haggman, Montgomery and 
Cooley. Wilber and Lindsey received sweat- 
ers without monograms. 

The Stock- and Grain-Judging Trip. 

Two weeks ago yesterday the advance guard 
of our corn- and stock- judging teams returned 
from Chicago, and a day or two later the last 
stragglers came in. We were not quite such a 
happy set of fellows as was seen taking the 
east-bound flyer about a week previous, for we 
did not come back winners, as we had hoped 
to do. But we came back feeling that we had 
done our best and had been beaten fairly, and 
that all that remained for us to do was to en- 
courage the boys who are eligible to take part 



in the contest next year, to work harder than 
we did and go prepared to win. 

The trip was a grand one for us, as most of 
us had never before seen the Mississippi river, 
or crossed to the metropolis of the Great Lakes. 
The way our lower jaws dropped and our eyes 
"bugged out," as we stepped off of the train 
and started up the streets of the big city, was 
very noticeable. At any rate every one we saw 
seemed to notice it. 

There were many things to interest us, but 
the center of our attraction was the "Inter- 
national Stock Show," which was the greatest 
of its kind ever held; and all of our time be- 
fore the stock-judging contest, which took 
place on Saturday, was spent there, in looking 
over the stock, under the directions of Pro- 
fessor Kinzer 

When Saturday morning came we were on 
hand promptly at 8 o'clock, to begin work. 
Owing to the large number of contestants, we 
were divided into three classes, and three 
classes of animals were brought in at once. 
When we had worked fifteen minutes, we 
shifted to a different class of animals. After 
three classes of animals had been placed, we 
were called before the judges one at a time to 
give our reasons for placing, each one being 
allowed three minutes. This operation re- 
quired some time, and before wa had all placed 
our twelve classes of stock, we had had two 
short intermissions for dinner and supper, and 
were working away by electric light with the 
hands of our watches fast approaching raid- 
night. We all pronounced it the hardest day's 
work we had ever experienced, as we had been 
on our feet nearly the entire time and were not 
allowed to carry on any conversation. 

The remainder of our time was spent in 
sight-seeing, both at the show and around the 
city, excepting on Monday forenoon, when we 
settled down to business in the corn-judging 
contest. E. C. Gardner, K. S. A. C. '04, acted 
as chaperon and showed us some of the 
points of interest, such as the main business 
street, also the "Masonic Temple, " that grand 
twenty-one story building, from the top of 
which one can see over the whole city of Chi- 
cago ; the magnificent art gallery ; the Chicago 
river with its lake steamers ; and last, but not 
least, the shore of the great Lake Michigan. 

Although the results are not what we hoped 
and tried to make them, we came back feeling 
that we had gained a great deal of good from 
our trip, and we would urge all who can to 
put forth a greater effort next year, that 
Kansas may be brought to the top in these 
great international contests, and may stand 
ahead of all other states and nations. 



214 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Marr»: LrrCvtsv 

One Cultivate Hi* 

OwmGemiv*. • 

'Printed In College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-offlce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 

Subscription rates: One dollar a year. In advance. 
• Sin frle copies, five cents. 



Assoc. Local Editors 



P. A. Kiene. Jr., '08 .Editor-in-chief 

(Juovkh Kahl. *07 Business Manager 

E. C. Pa nit a u. '07 Literary Editor 

L. E. Gaston, m Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple, '07 Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. '07 ...Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins, "08 I 

A. G. Phillips, 07 I 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04 .....Alumni Editor 

Jar R. Coxen, 'OS Reporter 

> i ■ — - ' - 

All orders for subscriptions and Inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure Insertion, matter Intended for publication 
should be hung on the editor-in-chief's hook not lateJ 
than Monday noon of each week. 

A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any Information concerning alumni. 

Manhattan, Kan., Jan. 11, 1906. 




D1TQRIAI 




Welcome, new students. 



Happy New Year, and a prosperous one to 
all Herald readers. 



The Herald extends its sympathy to Miss 

Cecilia Augspurger in the recent death of her 
father. _, 

We take pleasure in calling the attention of 
the new students to the many forms of student 
activity so abundantly present in our institu- 
tion and the varied opportunities for doing 1 
good in them and for them. 

Six literary societies and several associa- 
tions, prominent among the latter being the 
Athletic and the Young Men's and Young 
Women's Christian Associations, afford the 
student, new and old, opportunities for 
supplemental work to that of the classroom 
and College, work which widens a student's 
nature, that broadens his views and contributes 
to the well-rounded life as nothing else in his 
College experience. 



Your College work should be your first 
consideration always, but not to the degree 
that will shut you out from doing good wher- 
ever the opportunity presents itself. Self 
interest to a fault is had for the student, for 
his college and his state, so be generous of 
your time and energy and give ungrudgingly 
and without a call when convinced that the end 
justifies the means. 



True Worth, 

True worth Is in being, not seeming. 

In doing each day that goes by 
Some little good not in the dreaming 

Of great things to do by-and-by. 
Por whatever men say in blindness. 

And spite of the fancies of youth. 
There's nothing so kingly us kindness. 

And nothirig so royal as truth. 

We get back our mete as we measure, 

We cannot do wrong and feel right. 
Nor can we give pain and gain pleasure. 

Por justice avenges each slight. 
The air for the wing of the sparrow. 

The bush for the robin and wren, 
But always the path that is narrow 

And straight for the children of men. 

-Attrt f'ttrv. 

Athletic Association. 

At a meeting of the Athletic Association held 
last Saturday, S. W. < 'unningham was elected 
basket-ball manager. He, together with Gen- 
eral Manager Dean, will arrange a schedule 
at once. 

The association also adopted the following 
resolution: "We, the member* of the Athletic 
Association, wish to discourage the custom of 
wearing the College monogram or letters, in 
any form, on sweaters unless the privilege is 
granted by the Athletic Association." A com- 
mittee was appointed to request the down-town 
merchants to quit selling sweaters monograms. 



Alpha Beta. 

The A. B. ag. boys gave a stock-judging de- 
monstration Saturday. They claim it was 
"a dinger." Professor Birch tried to look 
wise as he called for criticisms by members of 
the class upon two classes of "Porcelain China" 
swine. If the short-course hoys had been 
present they might have gained some valuable 
ideas. After the class was dismissed Jim 
Garver sang ''Down on the Farm," with Scott 
Fay as accompanist. 

In a partial election, Miss Julia Wendel was 
chosen president for the winter term, E. W. 
Matherly was elected vice-president, Jessie 
Allen and M. G. Smith were given the posi- 
tions of recording and corresponding sec- 
retaries. Winnie Smith as critic will tell us 
how to behave, andderogatorily comment upon 
our conduct when we displease him. 

For two pleasing piano duets we wish to ex- 
tend to Miss Elsie Brown and Miss Tillie 
Harold the thanks of the society. a. l. h. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



215 




Prof.— "After to-day, gentlenen. I will not 
call the roll, but will expect those absent to 
speak to me about it at the end of the hour." 

-Ex 

If .you are weak enough to blame others for 
your failure in life, you are too weak to carry 
out any determination that would bring you 
success.- -Ex. 

flunked, flunked, flunked, 
Oh. those d — old exams,, 

O.Gee! 
And I would that it were decent to utter 
The thoughts that arise 

in me. — Jfe. 

A marble monument of Doctor S wens son is 
being- made in Italy. When completed it will 
be placed in front of the main college building 
at Bethany as a memorial to their beloved 
president. — Ex. 

"'Look not mournfully into the past; it comes 
not back again. Wisely improve the present: 
it is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy fu- 
ture without fear and with a manly heart." 
LrmftfeHmc. 

At Northwestern University, each year at 
the football banquet, fobs, composed of solid 
gold, in the shape of miniature footballs, are 
presented to the men who have played four 
years of 'varsity foothall. Ex. 

The Yale University museum has brought to 
light a valuable collection of Central Ameri- 
can antiquities. Strange to say these relics 
have been in the museum building for twenty- 
six years, but they were in boxes, were left un- 
opened, and their value was never realized.- 
Ex. 

Although Purdue is universally known as an 
engineering school, it has the distinction of 
having "reared" America's foremost cartoonist 
John McCutcheon; its most successful living 
playwright, George Ade, and one of its most 
popular novelists, George Barr McCutcheon. 
— Ex. 

"This then must be our notion of the just 
man— that even when he is in poverty or sick- 
ness or any other seeming misfortune, all 
things in the end work together for good to 
him in life and death; for the gods have a care 
of any one whose desire is to become just and 
to be like God, as far as man can attain his 
likeness, by the pursuit of virtue."— Plato. 



There is no easy .road to success. I thank 
God for it. A trained man will make his life 
tell. Without training, you are left on the sea 
of luck, where thousands go down while one 
meets success.— Jamen A. Garfield. 

A freshman.— One whose chief duty is to give 
special advice to the instructors. 

A sophomore.— 

A junior. — Something betwixt a sophomore 
and a senior. 

A senior.- One who is beginning to realize 
that he doesn't know it all.- Ex. 

Applicant, at the pearly gates: Pray, let 
me in. 

Gabriel : Hast fulfilled the commandments 
and done good without ceasing? 

Applicant: From my earliest recollection. 

Gabriel : Didst subscribe to the school 
paper t 

Applicant: No. I read the other fellows. 

Gabriel : §> — Ex. 

An Irishman was at work on a hoisting 
machine that carried hods of brick to the top 
of a building, and brought them down empty. 
Happening 1o get caught he was carried to the 
upper floor, and in the orderly hut rapid 
progress of the machine was brought to the 
ground rather suddenly. A fellow Workman 
leaned from the second story scaffolding and 
cried, "Are you hurt, Pat?" ;i You go to the 
divvel!" shouted Pat, "I passed you twist and 
ye never spoke to me." —Saturday Evening 
Pout. 

The Hamilton Club of Chicago offers prizes 
of $100 and $50 for the best oration dealing 
with the life and times of Alexander Hamilton. 
The contest is open to nine colleges and 
universities — Michigan, Wisconsin, North- 
western, Chicago, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 
Minnesota and Knox. This is the third suc- 
cessive year that the prizes have been offered 
and the interest runs high. The contest will 
be decided January 11. Each of the universi- 
ties is busily engaged in selecting its repre- 
sentatives.— Jftc. 

Stanford University not only boasts of the 
largest gymnasium, 298x178 feet, and a cov- 
ered quarter-mile track surrounding the build- 
ing, but also has one of the most-extensive 
and best-equipped athletic fields in the country. 
It contains about forty acres of perfectly level 
land, which is laid out for football, base- 
ball, tennis, and track athletics. There is one 
field for the 'varsity football team and supple- 
mentary fields for class teams. In additon to 
this, tennis courts are scattered promiscu- 
ously about the campus itself.— Ex. 



216 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




.7. W. Painter is grafting- for the Model 
Laundry. 

A number of juniors are specializing 1 in cal- 
culus this term. 

Miss Ethel Alexander is teaching in the 
Phillipsburg city schools. 

James Garver raves in his sleep about the 
appetites of the new farmers. 

We wonder if the injury to Assistant Me- 
liek's eye is one of the results of married life? 

You ought to see ''Prof." Marcia Turner 
teach her grammar classes. She is a credit to 
the '06 class. 

The Y. M. C A. kept open house last week. 
The parlors were filled each evening with old 
and new students. 

The Coop, book-store did a big business, as 
usual, last week.' The sales of January 3 
amounted to $91 1 01. 

"Bertha Helen'' Wilber is one of the rook- 
ies this term. He will hlossom out in a new 
uniform in the near future. 

The L O. O. P., of Kansas, have purchased 
the Eureka Lake hotel and grounds and will 
use it for an orphan's home. 

The Daily Republic ceased to exist on Jan- 
uary 1. The tri- weekly Nationalist was changed 
to a weekly on the same date. 

The Commercial Club of Manhattan is rais- 
ing subscriptions for a $1000 clock to be 
placed in the new court-house. 

Herbert Strong, who played right field last 
spring, is in College again. He expects to be 
out on the diamond next spring. 

F. W. Roberts, student in '03, visited old 
College friends December 22. He is managing 
his father's ranch in Ellis county. 

Room for more. Board, room, light and 
bath, all for $3.00 per week at J. S. Mont- 
gomery's, northwest corner of College grounds. 

T. W. Buell and wife, of Roanoke, Tex., 
visited College and the Alpha Beta society 
last Saturday afternoon. They left for their 
home Wednesday. 

Maud Zimmerman, *02. ex-local and ex- 
exchange editor of the Herald, remembered 
us with a few locals this week, for which we 
are duly grateful. 

The Choral Union has decided to give its 
second annual concert on March 8. It will be 
assisted by the Glee Club, Prof. O. Valley, 
and several soloists. A noted violinist from 
Chicago is also expected to take part. 



While performing some involuntary gym- 
nastics on the ice last Wednesday, Harry Han- 
son hurt one of his knees, and is walking ac- 
cordingly this week. 

The drill room of the Armory was enlarged 
during the holidays by tearing out the parti- 
tions of the rooms formerly used by the 
Athletic Association. 

The glee club is planning a few trips to 
nearby towns this coming spring. The boys 
are working hard with their music and deserve 
a reward. Keep it going. 

Freshmen and sub-freshmen blossomed out 
last week in class caps. Upper classmen claim 
that they were subject to a "graft" by the 
dealer who disposed of the caps. 

Edward Baker, who has been farming with 
his father near Brenner, Kan., since leaving 
College in 1903, has purchased a large ranch in 
the short-grass region near West Plains. 

William Etherton, student in *03, and Miss 
Lottie Dubaeh were married December 2tt, at 
the home of the hride's parents, near Wathena. 
They went to housekeeping on the groom's 
farm, near Troy, Kan. 

"Prof." M. M. Hastings has resigned his 
position in the poultry department and Mr. 
W. A. Lamb, of Manhattan, has been elected 
to fill the vacancy. We will hardly know 
what to do without Hastings and his chickens. 

Prof, and Mrs. J. T. Willard entertained at 
a six o'clock dinner, Saturday, December 30. 
The guests were: Prof, and Mrs. Oscar Erf, 
Prof, and Mrs. Albert Dickens, Prof, and Mrs. 
R. R. Price, and Prof, and Mrs. R. J. Kinzer. 

We wish to announce that the Choral Union 
will meet each Thursday at 12:15 for the pur- 
pose of practice and that the Glee Club will 
meet each Wednesday at 12:30. Members of 
each, please take note and try to be present on 
time. 

Milo Hastings and his assistants are fitting 
up a gymnasium in the basement of the Dairy 
Hall, for the use of students who will take part 
in track athletics this coming spring. Places 
for wrestling, jumping, weights, and the like, 
are being arranged. 

The Franklins elected the following officers 
last Saturday evening: Richard Reece, presi- 
dent ; L. R. Elder, vice-president; Clara 
Schield, recording secretary ; G. E. Yerkes. 
corresponding secretary ; C. E. Kirby, critic ; 
L. M. Graham, treasurer. 

Roy Rogers, student from Wathena in '01, 
was married in Chicago recently to Miss 
Gamiel. He has been in a hospital for some 
time on account of a lame arm that he injured 
while playing baseball. He will join his peo- 
ple in New Mexico as soon as he is able to 
travel. 

The ear tests for the breeding up of corn, 
which took place the past year, showed varia- 
tions of from thirty to seventy-five per cent of 
good and bad ears. The varieties used were 
Iowa Silver Mine, McCauley's White. Kansas 
Sunflower, Hildreth, Reed's Yellow Dent, and 
Red Injun. McCauley's Whive appears to have 
done the best at the present time." 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



21' 



Class elections are in order this week. 

Jesse Bealy has been troubled with sore eyes 
lately. 

C. E. Whipple is doing- cartoon work for the 
Hamps. 

Misses Jessie Sweet and Mary S trite visited 
their alma mater last week. 

" Swud" Lawson was shaken off of a front 
porch last Sunday evening 1 . 

Revival meetings are in progress at the 
Methodist church this week. 

The hoys with monogram sweaters do not 
button their coats these days. 

O. O. Morrison has been out of College a 
few days on account of sickness. 

About $+300 was taken in by the Secretary 
last week on account of the incidental fee. 

State Architect Stanton was here January 4 
conferring with the contractors of the new 
buildings. 

The Herald is indebted to the Union Na- 
tional Bank and Geo. T. Fielding & Sons for 
'OB calendars. 

Harry Hill was showing his cousin. Miss 
Schotteld, of Toledo, Ohio, around College 
last Monday. 

W. W. Stanfield has resigned his position 
at the dairy barn. McCall and Suzuki have 
divided his work between them. 

A new quarto-medium Gordon job press for 
rapidly accumulating light work has been re- 
ceived' by the Printing Department. 

Some of the seniors are roaring because 
they are not allowed to take their plant mor- 
phology and physics laboratory on Monday. 

Assistant Shoesmith was unable to meet his 
classes last week on account of an attack of 



' grippe. 



He is able to be around this week. 



Gertrude Hole will have charge of the Ex- , 
periment Station laboratory until the Regents 
meet and appoint the successor of Assistant 
Shaw. 

Mr. William Barker, former student, stopped 
in town between trains one day last week while 
on his way to Salina to attend the business 
college. 

E. W. Matherly is just out again after six 
weeks confinement on account of scarlet fever. 
A cute little mustache seems to be the only 
serious result. 

A fire which broke out in one of the rooms 
at the Y. W. house last week caused quite a 
little excitement, but was extinguished before 
it had done much harm. 

Orendorff thought somebody had cracked the 
safe in the post-office Sunday night. After he 
recovered from his fright he discovered that it 
was only an earthquake 

John Missildine, former student at K. S. A. 
C« met with quite a serious accident recently, 
while working in a laboratory at Winfield. 
Some of the apparatus he was working with 
exploded, causing considerable damage. 



Several former students, who have been out 
of College for some time, are back this term. 
Among them are Misses Delia Matteson, Julia 
Wendel, and Lulu Carlatt. 

The Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. cabinets had a 
joint supper at the home of Mrs. Flannery, on 
Fremont street. Business and a social time 
was the object of the meeting. 

Miss Antonetta Becker, the new superinten- 
dent of the Domestic Art Department, arrived 
January 1 and took up her work at once. Miss 
Becker is a graduate of Drexel Institute. 

Professor Willard had a column article in 
the Daily Drover's Journal, of Chicago, on 
January 1. The subject of his article was, 
" What the Experiment Station Did in 1!H)5." 

A list of some coming events: January 22, 23, 
24, Corn Breeders* Association: January 27, 
Inter-Society Oratorical Contest; January 30, 
Cleveland Ladies Orchestra in the Auditorium. 

As you sew, also shall you rip. 
Prep. 

Pipe 

Flunk 

Hike. 

The Printing Department has published a 
neat fifty -page pamphlet on dairying, entitled 
" Dairy Arithmetic," by Prof. Oscar Erf. It 
will be used as a text book in some of his 
classes. 

Student in music: "Professor, do you 
know yet what hour I am to take my lesson?" 
Professor: "The Lord only knows; I don't." 
Student: "Well. a;e you going to ask Him, 
or shall If" 

A. Miyawaki, of Sapporo, Japan, is taking 
special dairy work in the creamery this term. 
He comes here from a high school in California, 
where he has been for the past three years. He 
expects to become a teacher in his native land. 

The contestants in the inter-society oratorical 
contest, which is to be held in January, are: 
R. R. Birch, Alpha Beta; M. R. Shuler, 
Webster; E. W. Wilson, Franklin; C. E. 
Davis, Hamilton; Marcia Turner, Ionian. 
Thev will speak in the order named. Shall 
the '"first be last and the last first V" 

The Hamiltons elected the following officers 
for the winter term : C.I. Weaver, president: 
C. E. Davis, vice-president; Pat Brown, re- 
cording secretary : J. H. Cheeney, correspond- 
ing secretary; *R. Greene, critic; L. W. 
Lawson, treasurer : McCall, marshal : P. E. 
Lttl, assistant marshal: M. L. Parsons, H. E. 
Porter, E. G. Schafer, C. G. Nevins, and 
Donald Ross, board of directors: M. M. 
Hastings, C. E. Whipple and W. B. Gernert, 
program committee. 

Saturday being election, the following 
musical program was given in the Ionian 
society : Piano solos. Edna Jones, Miss 
Ny strom, Marie Coons, Miss Hiltiard. and a 
duet by Elsie Brown and Tillie Harold. Mr. 
Kittell gave an alto horn selection, accom- 
panied with the piano. Beryl Rickman, Irma 
Church, Florence Sweet, the Biddison sisters, 
and the Ionian quartette, furnished vocal 
music. Laura Lyman was elected president, 
and Odessa Dow, vice-president. 



218 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



W. N. Birch. '04, was about College a few 
days last week. 

George Q. Greene, '00, and Alice ( W or ley ) 
Greene are the happy parents of a hoy. 

Mary Strite, '05, who is teaching school 
near Ogden, visited College classes Saturday. 

Stewart Cole, '04-, who is teaching school 
west of Manhattan, was about College, Sat- 
urday. 

A. 6. (inhfin. '03, assistant state entomolo- 
gist at College Park. Md., has been home for a 
winter vacation. 

Margaret Cole. '05, who is teaching school 
in Clay county, spent the holidays at her home 
on College Hill. 

Clara Goodrich, '03, who is a lady of leisure 
at home this winter, spent the holidays with 
Miss Failyer. '03. of Manhattan. 

George Gasser. '(15, passed through Manhat- 
tan last Monday on his way to Ft. Riley, 
where he will serve as secretary for the Y. M. 
C. A. there. 

Perry Thomas is the name of the little boy 
who came to brighten the home of Henry M. 
and Jeanette (Perry) Thomas, both 'US, on 
December 28. 

S. I. Wilkin, junior in '02, writes that this 
has been a prosperous year with him, and 
sends in a liberal contribution to the Y. M. C. 
A. building fund. 

Blanche Stevens, '05, brought two of her 

brothers to College this term and expects to 

stay and take care of them and carry some 
postgraduate work. 

Miss Flora Perry, junior last term, and E. H. 
Hodgson, '03, were married recently at the 
home of the bride in Little River, Kan. The 
Herald extends congratulations. 

C. P. Hartley. '02, assistant plant physiolo- 
gist United States Department of Agriculture, 
will be one of the principal speakers at the 
Kansas Corn Breeders' Association, which 
meets here next week. Mr. Hartley has direct 
charge of the government work in "corn breed- 
ing. 

AIXEN-BUELL. 

On Monday evening, January 1, at the home 
of the bride's mother, just south of the College, 
occurred the marriage of Thomas W. Buell and 
Marian Allen, both of the class of '04. At ex- 
actly eight-thirty, Irene Ingrabam sang "Annie 
Laurie," and followed immediately with a 
wedding march, by which A. N. H. Beeman '05, 
as groomsman, and Amy Allen *04, as brides- 
maid, entered the room, followed by the bride 
and groom. Reverend Atkinson, of the Bap- 
tist church, of Manhattan, performed the im- 
pressive ring ceremony, in the presence of 
about sixty relatives and friends. 

The parlors were very tastily decorated with 
potted plants and cut* flowers, these having 
been arranged by Mr. Baxter. 

After the wedding ceremony a dainty two- 



course lap supper was served by Jessie Allen, 
Adah Lewis. Odessa Dow and Vesta Williston. 

The high esteem in which the young couple 
are held by their many friends was partially 
shown by the many useful gifts they received. 

Miss Allen has grown to womanhood in Man- 
hattan, and Mr. Buell is a native of the Pan- 
handle State. While in College they were both 
members of the Alpha Beta society, and Mr. 
Buell was a tireless Y. M. C. A. worker. 

They will make their home near Roanoke, 
Tex. Our best wishes go with thein to their 
southern home. C. T. 

Additional Exchanges. 

A fishy old fisher named Fisher 
Fished from the ed^e of a tissure. 

A cod. with a tfrin, 

Hulled the fisherman in. 
Now they're flshintr the fissure for Fisher.- ■ A>. 

"Time is money." said the student as he 
pawned his watch. Ex. 

The total attendance at the games played by 
Nebraska this fall was 14,250: the amount of 
gate receipts. $14,508.- Ex. 

The senior class memorial at Illinois Uni- 
versity will he a gateway, at one of the campus 
entrances, costing $400. Ex. 

Columbia has recently received the bequest 
of $50,000 for the formation of a Roosevelt 
chair of American H i story . — Ex. 

The true way to get happiness is to make 
others happy. This is a simple and certain 
plan, and it costs nothing. Try it. 

Monmouth College has received a gift of 
130,600 from Carnegie for a library building, 
provided they raise an equal amount to endow 
the library.- Ex. 

'"What's the trouble, Willie?" said Mrs. 
Brown to her small son, who was crying. "My 
kite won't fly." sobbed Willie, "and I made it 
out of fly-paper, too.**— Ex. 

"The fact that one person annoys us does not 
justify us in visiting it on the next person we 
meet." Each should guard oneself against 
giving vent to his feelings in this way. 

Professor in Logic— "Mr. B, will you give 
us an example of the universal negative?" 
Mr. B. --"Not prepared, doctor." Professor- 
"Yes, that is quite universal." — Ex. 

A prominent drummer for a Kansas City 
house, while in a conversation a few days ago 
with a fellow drummer, said the whiskey busi- 
ness in Kansas has fallen off sixty per cent 
since the Kansas City, Kan., agitation began. 
— Ex. 

At a recent mass meeting of the students of 
Ottawa Cniversity. they voted to paint the 
dome in the college yellow, doing away with 
the time-honored custom of dome painting by 
classes. Now they are regretting trheir hasty 
action somewhat, and are talking of reconsid- 
ering the matter. 

The daily Murium published an eight-page 
issue as a souvenir of the Michigan-Chicago 
game. It contains cuts of the team, the field, 
and other appropriate illustrations, a history 
of the game, full statistics of both teams, and 
other interesting features. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



219 



NEW AND 2<BT T% C I AriM/^LT SPECTACLES 

SCHOOL BOOKS fi ■ C- L. W T IINUrV GOLD PENS 

DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, CUT GLASS, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CEMT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Odds and Bads. 

It is second nature for some people to be 
honest. 

"Some men's natural bent seems to be pat- 
terned after a corkscrew. ' ' 

. It is second nature for some people to attend 
strictly to their own business. 

Those who stir up tires of anger get burnt 
with the flames of their own making. 

"Talk is cheap, but like other cheap things 
it is likely to prove expensive in the end." 

The best way to disappoint a person who is 
trying to make you mad is not to get mad. 

There is a time to critici se, and there is a time 
to encourage. The man who knows when to do 
each is a world benefactor. 

To be cheerful and considerate when you feel 
happy is the normal attitude. True greatness 
consists in smiling in the face of adversity. 

The evil word—and oh, remember this— is 
a step, a long step, beyond the evil thought, 
and it is a step toward the precipice's edge. 
— F. W. Farrar. 

He who does a good deed is instantly enno- 
bled. He who does a mean deed is by the 
action itself contracted. He who puts off im- 
purity thereby puts on purity.— Emerson, 

So long as we love, we serve; so long as we 
are loved by others I would almost say that 
we are indispensable; and no man is useless 
while he has a friend.— .Robert Louitt Stevenson. 

Little Willie, who is a Philadelphia boy, had 
been watching a dog chasing his tail for three 
minutes. "Papa," he asked, "what kind of a 
dog is that?" "That," said the father, "is a 
watch dog." Willy was silent for a moment. 
"Well," he finally said, "from the time he takes 
to wind himself up, I guess he must be a Wa- 
terbury watch dog."— Philadelphia Ledger. 



Rebuilding Sale 

$12.50, $13.50 and $15 Suits Now $10 



We have gone through our stock 
and where one or two of a kind are 
left (of the above named prices) 
we have btlnched them in one lot 
and price. 

30 Suits 
at $10 

All our Suits and Overcoats, includ- 
ing our fine hlack Suits at 20 per 
cent off. Sweaters, 20 per per cent 
off. Shoes, rubbers, suit cases, 
fancy vests, at 10 per cent off. 



E. L. Knostman 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers, Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



I 



VARNEY'S - BOOKSTORE 

College Text-Books and College Supplies 

We guarantee our prices to be as low or lower than elsewhere. We guarantee the quality of goods the 
best We carry the famous Keuffei & Esser Drawing Materials. Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens. Varney 
Fountain Pens onlv$l, Henry Sears & Co. Warrented Knives. K. S. A. C. Writing Tablets and Envelopes 
College Souvenir Postal-cards, Co-ordinate paper, Single-leaf Note-books. Hlggings' India Ink. Koh-I- 
noor Drawing Pencils. Eye Shades, Lamp Shades, etc.. etc. Second-hand Text-books at much less price. 






Varney's Bookstore. 



311 Poyntz Ave. 









•■ ■ 



• : V : '" ,.'V 






220 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




m 

i ONE-FOURTH 
J /. OFF .-. 



COONS 



Twenty -five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lay in a good supply now? Our Hand- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 



10 per cent off 

on 

Shoes 



J 
J 




-it is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy "your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Phis. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Special Rates to Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 

BOYLE, Prop. 

EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C, R. I. fir P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11 3-15 N. Second St. 



Kings 



Fountain Drinks 

Ice-Cream 



Homemade 
Candies 



We Lead* 
Others Follow 




r 



lani 



!■ Bi 



I 



I 



71 



"THE OLD RELIABLE 



JS 



.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 

Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 




All Kinds of- 



Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. 

ICE CREAM SODAS 



Finest 



L L 



i 



i 

i 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



fl 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. <J If so. don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
1£ Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. ^ Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal St9. 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drunim Street. 



General Offices: 

74 Cortland t Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

131 YouTille Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 Vork Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 






V, 





















\ 



L 



i 



W. S. ELLIOT 



* 
* 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 






IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING 



x 



x 



Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



*S««««X^SS!Wa»Si«*3i^^S^^S«iXS« 



i 



1 



i 



photographic! 



SUPPLIES ALWAYS FRESH 



* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

1 

* 



Pencils 


Underwear 


Ribbons 


Tablets 


Handkerchiefs 


Neckwear 


Note-Books 


Room Furnishings 


Souvenir Goods 


Lunch Boxes 


Ladies' Golf Gloves 


Fancy Work Materials 


Fancy Box Stationery 


Knit Shawls & Scarfs 


Japanese Basket Telescopes 



You are Always Safe on Price and Quality at 

8 the big racket 



c. 



B. 



H 



N 



m 



IW 



\ 



<3Che Students' Herald 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X X. 








•i 






I : i 



i 



Keuffel & Esser Co. 

* OF NBin£ YORK * 

813 Locust Street, - Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Arrow Brand" 

99 



DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil" 
"Duplex" 
"Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES JEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS Uy, 

6QO-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 




E, L. Askren 

Jeweler and 
Optician 




Graduated optician. Spectacles scientifically 
fitted. Fine watch and jewelry repairing a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 



Manhattan 



Kan 



a s 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trains day 
and night. Will call any 
place in town for passen- 
gers. X X 

Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette in the 
city. Suitable (or class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate. X 



Phone 



226 



■„ 



\ 







v 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



221 



^ If you want a 
picture of the IC 
S, A, G Football 
team order now, 
at Wolfs Studio, 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O,, Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 

MEAT, V EGETA BLES, Etc. 

PHONE - 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS *1.00 

302 Poyntz P. C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



33 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Walt for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 



E B, ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



21© Poyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine line of cifrars and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 



BOYS! 

0070 IKE HOLBERT'S 



FOR 

Oysters 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



BARNEY YOUNGCAMP, Prop. M3 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Buildtae. . • • 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine Hneclgmrsand toilet articles 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, Wc 
offer you only the best, X A- 

W. M, STDMGLEY & CO 



222 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



TT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry -Goods Room. 

We are making special prices 

on many article* to close them 

out before invoicing. Call 111 

and see what we are offering. 

Royal Worcester Corsets with 
hose supporters, SO cents and $1. 

RMdy-to-Wear Room. 

Special sale on winter suits. 

•25 suits lor $|8 

•l* " " «8 

Biff bargains In Winter Cloaks. 
McCall Patterns, 10 cents and 
18 cents, none higher. 



Shoe Room. 

Ten per cent ofl «n all our 
Shoes this month. 

Art squares and rugs. 



Hardware Room. 

Keen Kutter goods. Pocket- 
knives. Razors, Shears, Scissors, 
Saws, Axes, Edge tools. Stoves 
and Ranges, Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters. We will save 
you money on Guns and loaded 
Shells. 



Grocery Room. 

A complete assortment of 

Staple add fancy Grocetiei. 

Oranges, Bananas, Lemons and 

Apples. All Imits in season. 

Murdock's Club Coffee, 1 -pound 

packages, Murdock's Nectar 

Coffee, 1-pourid packages, Mur- 
dock's Hecla Coffee, 1-pound 
packages. Murdock's Bulk 
Coffees, Murdock's O. P. T. Ex- 
tracts. Money back if not 
satisfactory. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' wal „ Wi mm ftnd ^ ^^ up ^ 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc 

Phone 87 for I>ry.Goods, Ready-to-wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Students 

WE WILL SELL YOU A $15 
UNIFORM FOR $12 AND 



Don't 

Forget 

Our Large stock of 

FULL VAMP 
SHOES 

at cash prices, X 



SPALDING'S 



Moore Bros, & Co* 




Official 

Athletic 

Almanac 

FOR long — 



Edited by JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

Price 10 cents 



Send your name and address 
to our nearest store for 
Spalding's Catalogue of all 
Athletic Sports— it's free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 

Washington 

Boston 

Kansas City 

Buffalo 

Syracuse 



Chicago 
New Orleans 
Minneapolis 
Cincinnati 
Denver 
Montreal. Can. 



St. Louis 
San Francisco 
Baltimore 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburg 
London, Eog. 




PUBU5HED 

Each Thursday Bv 
The Students Of The 
Kansas Statc Agricultural College 

MottorLetEvejyOncCaltivateHis Ovum Genius. 



VOUUME XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., January 18, 1906. 



Number 17 



A Notable Student Convention. 

The Fifth International Convention of Student 
Volunteer Movement will be held at Nashville, 
Tenn.. bsginning Wednesday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 28, at three o'clock, and closing Sunday 
night, March 4, 1906. These Volunteer Conven- 
tions are held but once in each student genera- 
tion—that is, once every four years—and 
constitute the largest, the most representative, 
the most powerful, the most fruitful, and the 
most notable gathering's of the students of 
North America. 

The Nashville Convention will be attended 
by 3000 official delegates. Fully 500 univer- 
sities, colleges, and seminaries will be repre- 
sented by leading students, both volunteers 
and non-volunteers. Professors as well as 
students are invited. It is expected that at 
least 20*1 missionaries will be present from 
nearly forty of the mission fields of the world. 
The secretaries of the Foreign Missionary 
Societies of the United States and Canada and 
other leaders of the aggressive forces of Chris- 
tianity in North America will be present. The 
national leaders of the various movements for 
work among young people, as well as editors 
of the religious press, are invited. Fraternal 
delegates from Europe will also be present. 

The Convention will have four prominent 
features. In the first place, the main program 
will occupy the morning and night sessions, 
and will include the strongest speakers of Chris- 
tendom on the various themes to be presented. 

In the second place, there will be held in the 
afternoons some forty-five special conferences, 
each with its own complete program. For ex- 
ample, on one afternoon there will be confer- 
ences on the interesting and important mission 
fields of the church; another afternoon on the 
various phases of work and the different classes 
of workers; and on. still another afternoon 



the delegates will meet by denominations to 
consider the world's evangelization from their 
particular point of view. The third feature 
will be a lai'ge and impressive exhibit bearing 
on the progress of Christianity in the world. 
The fourth feature will be the exceptional op- 
portunities for intercollegiate, interdenomina- 
tional, and international fellowship. 

The benefits of this great gathering are lim- 
itless. Held at the most opportune time in the 
histoYy of the church, bringing together so 
many of the leading spirits in all the centers of 
learning, as well as the responsible leaders of 
the forces of Christianity, the Nashville Con- 
vention, with inexhaustible Divine resources 
available, will give a mighty impulse to the 
religious life of the colleges, stir the entire 
church to greater zeal and sacrifice for the 
realization of her missionary objective, and 
make possible a truly remarkable onward 
movement in the world's evangelization. 

Some of the reasons why an institution 
should send delegates are : 

1. Unquestionably it will be the greatest 
student convention ever held. The student 
summer conferences are for either men or 
women and are sectional. This convention 
includes representatives, both men and women, 
from all kinds of institutions of a continent. 
It will bring to each delegate the marked in- 
spiration which comes from meeting* repre- 
sentatives of 500 institutions of higher learning. 
No institution which plans to make, its influ- 
ence felt in the world can afford not to send a 
representative delegation to this convention. 

2. It will afford an unequalled vantage 
ground for viewing the vast world field. No insti- 
tution which desires touch with great world move- 
ments can be left without full representation. 

3. It will afford opportunities for meeting 
the great missionary leaders of the world. 



224 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



4. It will enable delegates to inspect the 
most interesting and valuable missionary ex-' 
Mbit ever assembled at a student conference. 

5. It will give the Christian students of our 
institutions an unexampled opportunity to real- 
ize the full significance of the great work which 
confronts the church, in which as laymen or 
clergymen they are to be leaders both at home 
and abroad. 

6. It will bring each institution inspiration 
from the fact that its leading students will come 
in touch with a center of marvelous power. 



WHIett's Lecture. 



A rather small but a very impatient audi- 
ence greeted Dr. Herbert Willett at nine o'clock 
on Tuesday evening, January f», when he ap- 
peared on the Auditorium platform. The delay 
was unavoidable on the part of the speaker, 
but the knowledge of this did not improve the 
disposition of the people who had waited since 
ha If -past seven. The lecture was preceded by 
selections by the mandolin club, and this music 
was enjoyed fully as much, by a large number 
of people, as was the talk which followed. 

The lecture as a whole was not satisfactory. 
Mr. Willett is an educated man and an excel- 
lent speaker, but his lecture was not up to the 
expectations of the audience. He started but 
well and then seemed to leave his subject and 
speak first on one topic and then on another. 
This was probably due, to some extent, to the 
restlessness of the audience, but still it hardly 
seemed to be excusable. Under more favorable 
circumstances, it may be that the lecture would 
have been enjoyed by all, but such can not be 
said of the lecture as given. 

The subject of the lecture was "New Conti- 
nents," but it was hard for a listener to tell 
wherein the subject was an appropriate one. 
Mr. Willett began by giving a brief history of 
the Moorish Conquest and ended by telling how 
to raise children successfully. He told of the 
discovery of America, and made a strong plea 
for College athletics. He told a few funny 
stories, recited some poetry, and spoke at some- 
length on art. In fact, it may be said that 

He spoke of many things; 

Of boys and toys and railroad trains. 

And cabbages and kings." 



A Letter from V. of A. 

Perhaps it will be of some interest to readers 
of the Herald to know something of a K. S. 
A. C.-ite's impression of another institution. 
Hence this effort. There are so many points of 
which I should like to write that I shall only 
mention a few in this article. 

My ideas of the University of Nebraska were 
necessarily rather vague from what I could 



glean from the catalogue and from a few short 
talks with Professor Corteiyou and Mr. Melick, 
both of whom are from U. of N. 

My first impression was a slight feeling of 
disappointment as I saw the size of the campus 
(an enclosure two blocks square lying only 
three blocks from the main street), in which 
the University buildings are crowded. The 
exterior is not always a fair standard by 
which to judge the interior, and I soon found 
this to be the case here. 

The process of registering, it seemed to me, 
was rather complicated. I had to fill out 
application blanks of such a length and of 
such detail as are equalled only by U. R. civil 
service application forms. After two days of 
conferring with deans, graduate committees, and 
heads of departments, I was duly registered as 
a graduate student. I was credited with work 
upon my mere statement that I had taken it, 
no credential of any sort being required. 

To speak a little of the botanical department, 
in which I am especially interested, I will say 
that I am delighted with the work, even be- 
yond my fondest hopes. Doctor Bessey as 
a lecturer is probably not excelled by any one 
in the United States, while Doctor Clements 
ranks high as an ecologist among present-day 
workers. While the equipment of the depart- 
ment is not what it should be, the instruction 
is very efficient, and any one who does not be- 
come enthused with his work and inspired to 
greater effort by coming in contact with Doc- 
tor Bessey and Doctor Clements has no busi- 
ness to be taking botany as a specialty. 

The differences in library regulations here 
and at K. S. A. C. are very striking. With 
the exception of holidays, the library is open 
from 8 A. M. until 10 p. m. No books are, to 
be taken from the library, however, unless 
with the permission of the head of the depart- 
ment, and then they may be kept only over 
night. This is a source of great annoyance, 
especially if the student has a considerable 
distance to go. The system at K. S. A. C, 
where certain books are reserved for reference 
and others are left free to lie drawn, suits me 
much better. 

There are many other things that I might 
mention, but which I shall defer until some 
later time, when the spirit moves me to write 
again. H F. Bergman, '05. 



Corn Breeders* Association Meeting. 
The second annual meeting and corn show of 
the Kansas Corn Breeders' Association will be 
held at this College January 22, 'Ofi, beginning 
with the evening session and lasting until the 
afternoon of January 24. A good program has 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



225 



been arranged, including 1 some of the most 
prominent agriculturists of the country. 
Prizes in the corn show will be given as fol- 
lows : 
For the best ten ears of yellow corn.— First 

prize, Piano mower; second prize, Kingman 
"No Tip" cultivator; third prize, two-by-six 
foot galvanized steel stock tank. 

For the best ten ears of white corn.— First 
prize, Black Hawk planter; second prize, 
Emerson No. 26 cultivator ; third prize, Acme 

harrow. 

For the best ten ears of corn, any other 
variety.— First prize, Dempster two-row culti- 
vator. The second and third prizes have not 
been definitely decided upon. 

1. All samples of corn exhibited for prizes 
shall become the property of the Farm De- 
partment of the Kansas State Agricultural 
College. 

2. No exhibitor shall make more than one 
entry in any class. 

3. The corn exhibited must have been grown 
by the exhibitor in 1905. 

4. All entries must be made by noon, 
January 22. 

During the summer the Farm Department 
conducted a contest for the "best acre of corn. 
The result of this contest will be announced at 
this meeting. The day meetings will be held 
in the old chapel and the evening meetings 
probably in the Auditorium. 

The agriculture students should give a great 
deal of attention to this meeting. A great deal 
of valuable information may be obtained by 
students who will improve their opportunities. 

Alpha Betas. 

The A. B's. were called to order by Vice- 
President Ray Birch. After singing the new 
A. B, song and being led in devotion, the 
newly elected officers were installed, after which 
Miss Wendel, the new prexy, made a short but 
hitting speech. 

A very interesting program was given in 
which Skinner, in his great scientific research, 
introduced Dr. Garver, professor of Bumps, 
who demonstrated his art in a very clever 
manner. After a violin solo by Miss Lane, 
accompanied by Miss Lill, professor Sullivan 
showed what could be done by his magic hyp- 
notic art. 

The business session was very interesting. 
After the initiation of W. A. Foster, the 
following officers were elected: P. H. Skinner, 
treasurer. Miss Olive McKeeman, marshal; 
Helen Westgate, Emery McKee, Mr. Hull, and 
Miss AUentharp, members of the board. We 
then went our several ways rejoicing, having 
stayed for the first time till the lights went out. 



An Accurate History of hump. Doings. 

After the preliminary ceremony, the new offi- 
cers were installed, whereupon we were treated 
to a pair of touching speeches by old and new 
presidents. The old worn-out officers being 
replaced by a fresh and ambitious lot, we pro- 
ceeded to business with new vigor. N. L. Par- 
sons and J. N. Bealey proved that the govern- 
ment of the United States is superior to that 
of Australia, although Gernert and Hull put 
up a good fight for the other side. D. Ross 
told us a big tale about having been connected 
with a counterfeiter's gang, and then Farrar 
sang for awhile. L. A. Ramsey discussed all 
kinds, makes and sizes of steam boilers, and 
Brink read an Al, standard-sized "Recorder." 
R. Green found fault with everybody. Lawson 
took up our change at recess, and I don't dare 
tell what happened from then until we hunted 
up our hats in the dark. J. H. C. 

lonlans. 

Society was called to order by President Mat- 
tie Pittman, followed by singing, Ethel Berry 
pianist, and devotion led by Ruth Nieman. 
The new officers were then installed and took 
their places. The president then responded to 
a call for a speech. The program was excep- 
tionally good. Alt the musical numbers were 
well given and well received. Charlotte Mor- 
ton gave an excellent recitation. Miss Stella 
Hawkins' talk on, "How to begin the new 
year," was good. The extemporaneous speak- 
ing, led by Miss Nicolet, deserves special men- 
tion for the selection of the questions asked 
and the responses given. The ''Oracle," 
edited by Ruth Nieman, was very interesting. 
After a lively business session we adjourned. 

E. B. 



Basket-Ball. 

The first basket-ball game of the season 
takes place to-morrow evening, when the Col- 
lege team meets the soldiers from Ft. Riley. 
Little is known of the strength of the visitors, 
but it is probable that our boys will win, for 
they have been practicing regularly for the 
past two weeks. The game will be called at 
7:30 in order that the soldiers can start back 
home on the 9:20 train. Commercial Club 
Hall, over the Spot Cash, has been secured for 
the game, and a good attendance is expected. 

Another game will be played next week, with 
Washburn, and if the receipts are sufficient 
games will be scheduled with K. U., K. S. N., 
Friends, and Baker, with probably several 
games played on a trip to he taken in March. 
It is hoped thut enough interest will be shown 
to insure the payment of expenses at least, for 
we have excellent material and good prospects. 



226 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



M»tt«: LctEvcpy 
Onc Cu iti vat t Hi* 
Own Oemim, »+• 

'Printed in College Printing Depart 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the postrofflce at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, five cents. 



o™™*?™ 1 ^ 08 ■ Editor-in-chief 

fTK b L w Business Manager 

i " « ™,?JZ P , l '^ r - ■.« Asso « Business Manager 

SKSi f 07 " ■ • Subscription Manager 

A. G. PHrLLrps, w t • Assoc. Tjocal Editors 

?a%K B ^t^ W ™ T ' , ° 4 " "■ Alumni Editor 

JA8. R, Loxen, 08 Reporter 



mJ£L£&2! > for Ascriptions and inquiries concerning 
wZSSSll? SPaCC UW be oadre « e « ^ ^e businesl 

tbSSJVt ' nserU °n- matter intended for publication 

th2SSf™ fl hun * on , the edltor-ln-ohJefs hook not late' 
tnau Monday noon of each week. 



h™ tlJS? 2P2 - ! tb,s ,tem means tf iat your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are moat respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager 

Elizabeth &WEKT. 'M, alumni editor, will be glad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. ° 



Manhattan, Kan., Jan. 18, 1906. 




ZDlTQWAl 




A few weeks ago the Rooters' Club made its 
last assessment to pay for the sweaters pur- 
chased for and presented to the football boys. 
The assessment was comparatively small and 
will cover all expenses of the club. About 
thirty-five dollars of the sixty required has 
been paid in and the remainder should he forth 
coming within the next week. The clothing 
store which took the order gave us the sweat- 
ers at flat cost and, we are convinced, at some 
small loss. This, together with the work and 
time necessary to prepare the sweaters, makes 
its contribution to the fund considerably 
larger than the combined dues of a number of 
club members. This has been given with a 
free hand because our athletic movement is 
considered one of the most important and one 
most worthy of encouragement by the business 
man. The students should refuse to take 
second place in loyalty to this phase of Col- 
lege endeavor and should see that the fund 
is soon completed. The new" roll will be made 
out as soon as the debts are paid, and it is the 



will of the club that only loyal members be 
given the privileges which it expects to secure 
next spring. 



The basket-ball season opens Friday evening 
with the Ft. Riley soldiers opposing. The 
game is to be played in the Commercial Club 
Hall, and will begin at 7:30 p.m. Every student 
that can spare the time should go to swell the 
crowd, and in judging should be most liberal. 
If basket-ball is to be played at all in our in- 
stitution, it will require the support of a con- 
siderable body of students. The expense of 
playing the game is comparatively slight, and 
this division of athletics could easily be made 
to swell the athletic fund. Our team has been 
given the privilege of Commercial Club Hall 
for both practice and games, and it is fast 
rounding into form. The principal thing that 
the team lacked in the Glasco tournament was 
that quality of endurance, and it was usually 
the last half in which it lost the games. The 
team that goes on the floor to-morrow evening 
will be able to play fast hall in the last minute? 
and will undoubtedly come off winners. 

We wish to mention, commend and thank 
the business men of Manhattan for their many 
courtesies extended to the student body during 
the past terra. They have shown an active 
interest in our athletic work, have watched our 
movements and expression of desires and have 
been liberal in contributing to their satisfac- 
tion. Among other things, The Rooters' Club 
received a handsome banner, the football boys 
were given pennants, we were given liberal aid 
in securing sweaters, and always the score- 
card and College papers were well patronized 
with advertising. The present term opens with 
the admirable concession of the Commercial 
Club Hall for basket-ball practice and games 
We would like to see the students show their 
appreciation for these many favors by observ- 
ing the advertising pages of their paper and 
then to deal with the men that there ask for 
patronage. 



Agricultural Association. 

Those agriculturally inclined assembled in 
the Ag. Hall at two o'clock Saturday after- 
noon. Mr. Hull invoked divine guidance. 
We next installed our newly elected officers 
With M. D. Snodgrass presiding, we turned 
our attention to the literary program. Our 
chief speaker, Professor TenEyck, could not 
be with us for another hour, so we proceeded 
to dispose of some of the business. We had 
nothing very important under this head, but 
Fred Caldwell and W. B. Gernet became en- 
tangled m a wordy conflict over some points 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



2*27 



of order, and considerable time was consumed 
in pacifying thera. 

The program was called for and some music 
that was to be, was not. Not being percep- 
tible, presumably it was absent. Mr. Snod- 
grass informed the new members of our plans 
for the term's work, and Fred Caldwell then 
expounded the virtues of stagnant water for 
live stock. Some one becoming fatigued called 
for recess, which was granted. After recess 
Professor TenEyck gave an illustrated lecture 
on the root system of the various farm plants. 
This is the kind of lectures we need, and we 
wish to express our thanks to Professor Ten 
Evck. Five o'clock was not far distant when 
we adjourned. A. J. Reed. 

Frankllnites. 

On account of our hall being under repairs, 
we met in the history room which was only 
half large enough, for, when "Bun" rapped for 
order, there was not even standing room. 
After roll-call the new officers were installed. 

The program began with an oration by Mr. 
Morgan, in which he convinced us that it is 
necessary to attend a literary society while in 
college in order to enjoy future life. Follow- 
ing this was a very interesting recitation by 
M?ss Durham. "Bun's" review of literature 
must have been ordered to come by express 
from New York (or China), since nothing of 
its nature has ever been seen or heard in this 
State. Mr. Baird gave us a declamation, then 
came the "Spectator," by Miss Alfrey, after 
which Miss Kerr recited a very sensational 
production. The debate, "Resolved, That 
juniors are of more benefit than the sopho- 
mores," was debated affirmatively by E. L- 
Shattuck and negatively by Miss Justin. The 
judges decided in favor of the sophomores. 

After recess, Mr. McFadden and Mr. Robert 
Wilson became Franklins. E. L. McClasky, 
who was charged with excessive display of 
class colors on his pedal extremities while at- 
tending literary society, was subjected to irial. 




Eurodelphton Society. 

We met upon the stage of the Auditorium, 
behind the curtain. This, of course, gave an 
added interest to the meeting. The program 
was entirely musical and consisted of a vocal 
solo by Allan Cooper, piano solos by Marie 
Coons, Wilma Evans, and Edna Jones. We 
were then favored by a vocal duet by John and 
Marguerite Elliot. Wilma and Mary Evans 
were then initiated and became members of the 

society. 
After an important and interesting business 

session, we adjourned. *• M - 



At a recent meeting of the Athletic Associa- 
tion a resolution was adopted, condemning the 
wearing of College monograms by any person 
unless awarded the privilege by the Athletic 
Association. This is a move in the right di- 
rection and it should have the support of the 
entire student body. OF course some people 
will object to this and will at first refuse to 
part with the K. A. C. on the front of their 
sweaters. This is only to be expected, for it 
does seem rather nice to unbutton your coat, 
push out your chest and attract the attention 
of visitors by the monogram on your east side. 
However, if every one will look at this in the 
right way, few objections will be raised. 

The monogram of the Athletic Association is 
given only to men who have played in six 
football, baseball or basket-ball games, or 
who have won fifteen points in intercollegiate 
track meets. It is given only to men who have 
worked for the College, and it should be the 
greatest honor that can be bestowed upon a 
College athlete. If the wearing of the mono- 
gram is confined to the men who have won the 
right to wear it, this will be the case; but if 
every third fellow wears some sort of a mono- 
gram our K. A. will be cheapened in the sight 
of the students, and the wearing of it will be- 
come an empty and insignificant sign. 

J. R. COXEN. 

Websters. 

Kirk called for "signals" in good season 
and "Hiram" C began the usual method of 
sifting out the faithful ones. We then listened 
to a program, the music of which need only to 
have been heard to be appreciated. Lindsey's 
"Webster Operatic Company" gave us several 
noisy— musical demonstrations, Mr. Crabb's 
whistling was the music and the rest made up 
the noise. However, Fred feels encouraged 
and expects to appear on our lecture course 
with his company next year. 

After the program we "recessed" for awhile, 
and then Sol. had the audacity to tell us that 
we were not all that we thought we were, or all 
that we might be. The first skirmish of the 
combatants then took place, when we war- 
danced around the hall for awhile until we had 
four new members ground through the process 
of "voting in." All visitors were then excused 
and we babbled around by ourselves until we 
u-rew tired of our own echoes. £■• M. J. 

*5 



Prof, (dictating prose)— "Slave where is 
thy horse?" Startled Student— "Its in my 
desk, sir, but I wasn't using it."— Ex. 



228 



THE STUDENTS ' HERALD. 




Jim Cheney has a new yellow dog. 

M. Ft. Edelblute ran into a freight train last 
Saturday evening. 

The Regents will hold their next meeting 
January 24. 

Professor Potter went rabbit hunting one 
night recently. 

Professor Brink was heard to say. "I'll just 
bet you a quarter." 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. V. M. Shoesmith, on 
Thursday, January 11, a girl. 

Pointz Avenue, between Second and Fourth 
streets, is being remacadamized. 

Prof. Oscar Erf attended the State Poultry 
Show in Topeka January 9 and 10. 

Several of the short-course girls have been 
out of College on account of sickness. 

Clark Travelute, freshman last vear, is at- 
tending business college at Quincy,* 111. 

Professor Potter says that his second-hour 
class of electrical engineers is the worst he 
ever saw. 

Hose cart No. 1, of the K. S. A. C. Fire 
Department, Station A, was supplied with new 
hose last Tuesday. 

Miss Louise Fleming entertained a few friends 
last Friday evening, in honor of Inez Morris, 
of Tecumseh, Kan, 

We recommend that the Executive Depart- 
ment take charge of the numerous stray doirs 
about the campus. 

The flag on Anderson Hall was hung at half 
mast last Thursday because of the death of 
George F. Thompson. 

One of the new students in telling when he 
had last attended school, wrote: "The vear 
before year ago last year.' 1 

The junior boys who have been knocking on 
the laboratory class hours have been disposed 
of in a satisfactory manner. 

The j Congregationalists of Manhattan cele- 
brated th? fiftieth anniversary of the founding 
of their church January 8 and ». 

*i J ^? n , Da ?, isman ' tr * avelin £ State Secretary for 
tne Y. M. C. A., was in town last Wednesdav 
evening and addressed the Y. M. & Y W 
cabinets. * 

Henry Avery & Son will sell their entire 
™? v w ft ?k ei ? na at pubUc sale » here ' Feb " 

tertained the stock-judging class last fall, on 
their ranch near Wakefield. ' 



Students in physiology "lab." are "dissect- 
ing, bisecting and masticating cats*' these 
days, according to one of the "sophs." 

Misses Edith Jones, Bertha Romine, and 
Bertha Schwab, of the Y.W. house, are con- 
fined to the house on account of illness. 

C. A. McMinimy, while running a foot race 
last week, fell and sprained his wrist. The 
next time he tries to stick his fist into the 
ground he will choose an unfrozen spot. 

Peter Peet Goeken, Ross Kusppenberger, 
Manuel Schimkowitsch. Frederick Wulfkuhle, 
Walter Toogood, and Grant Yausse are 
among those taking short course work this 
term. 

Geo. F. Thompson, editor of the publications 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Ag- 
ricultural Department, formerly superintendent 
of printing, died in Washington, D C, Jan- 
uary 6. 

President Nichols spent the greater part of 
last week in Topeka attending the annual meet- 
ings of the Corn Breeder's Association 
and State Board of Agriculture. He returned 
Saturday. 

Jim Cheney, chief mogul; Stella Campbell, 
heir to the throne; Winifred Dalton, first lieu- 
tenant and adjutant; E. A. Cowles, keeper of 
the dough; and "Bobby" Cassell, chief execu- 
tioner, are the senior officers for this term. 

J. J. McCray has the distinction of being 
the oldest student in College. He also has two 
children in College. Mr. McCrav is taking 
the farmers' short course. He is fifty-two 
years of age and was formerly county super- 
intendent of Nemaha county. 

The juniors elected the following officers at 
their meeting last Wednesday: Lois Fail ver 
president; Ethel Berry, vice-president; A.' B* 
Nystrom, secretary of state; Fred Lindsev 
secretary of the treasury; Percy Lilt, secretary 
of war; Flora Hull, secretary of navy. 

Another private class for the study of French 
is being organized. The promoters have asked 
Mr. Jackson to instruct them. The class will 
meet at some residence in the city, and for this 
and other reasons the membership will be lim- 
ited. Students wishing to become members of 
this class may consult Miss Sperry. 

At the first meeting of the Agricultural 
Association, on Saturday, January 8 the 
f ° Uo T wm jr offers were chosen for this terra: 
M. D Snodgrass, boss; Mr. Hall, bossee; 
Asa Zimmerman will have charge of the 
family skeleton while A. J. Reed will tell the 
neighbors all about it. M. L. Walter is chief 

Sffi £ B ^ Co ,P Iand - ^rdsman and 
Ralph Cooley, chore boy. 

i JK an i k - Ga °. t ' fpe8htt »an last year, accompan- 

™a b & hl 5 mfe < 9 ^ pped 07ep here !a«t Sunday 
and Monday on his way to his home place in 
Pratt county. He has been doing some specu- 
lating since leaving school-first a farm in 
s3 , .u? Dd vf°° n aft f rw ard married Miss ■ 
v«r . °feu y ', who was als0 a student here last 

Ki »«h 5- as J# ventu J p ?' he elaims ' was ^e 
best and his wife readily confirmed the state- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



229 



Some very nice blossoms are to be seen in 
the greenhouse this week. 

The College won a first prize at the poultry 
show held in Topeka last week. 

Lou Merritt, of Houston, Me., visited his 
cousin, Grover Kahl, last waek. 

Wanted, girl to work for board, at BOO Blue- 
mont. Mrs. Harvey Allingham. 

J. K. Codding, of Wamego, visited his bro- 
ther, H. C. Codding, for a few days last week. 
Several classes in mission study were started 
at the Y. M. C. A dormitory last Friday even- 
ing. 

An informal "hop" was given in one of the 
music rooms during the noon hour one day 
last week. 

The Alpha Beta society expects to have a 
social for themselves and invited guests in the 
near future. 

Doctor Schoenleber changed his place of resi- 
dence last week. He now lives at *if.h and 
Houston streets. 

The Vet. boys have been having warm times 
during the past week. Some time has been de- 
voted to athletic practice. 

Assistant Scheffer was called to his old 
home, in Delphos, Kan., last week on account 
of the death of his mother. 

Miss Jones, the stenographer for Professor 
Ten Eyek, is very ill with typhoid fever, and 
has been taken to the hospital. 

Professor Kinxer and Assistant Wheeler were 
in Topeka last week attending the Stock 
Breeder's Association meetings. 

A class in Latin, to be studied outside of 
College, is being organized^ Those wishing to 
join should address Box 213. 

Professor Dietrich, instructor of swine hus- 
bandrv in the Illinois College of Agriculture, 
visited College last Saturday. 

Bulletins No. 130. on "Steer-feeding Ex- | 
periment VII" and No. 131, on the -Care of 
Dairy Utensils," are being mailed this week. 

Miss Tva J. Anderson, preparatory student 
here two years ago. died at her £**£• *<** 
in Mayetta, Kan., Wednesday, January 10. 

President Nichols addressed a farmers' in- 
stitute in Stockton yesterday and ^day. «• 
will address a similar meeting m Minneapolis 
to-morrow. 

Walter E. Taylor, stenographer hi the 
Animal Husbandry Department, receiwd a 
visit from his brother, Charles, of Formosa, 
Kan., last week. 

A millionaire in Denver has asked the Dairy 
Department to ship him ten pounds of butter 
eS week. He says that the department ha. 
quite a reputation over the country for its good 
butter. 

F. L. Osburn, who has undergone three 
operations for appendicitis and its after 
effects, is still at the hospital He ta geHfc* 
along as well as could be expected. His father 
Is with him. 



General Secretary McLean left Monday for 
Oklahoma, where he will visit the colleges in the 
interest of the Nashville Convention. He will 
be gone about two weeks. . 

Professor Willard read a paper at the State 
Board of Agriculture meeting last week. His 
subject was, "Glimpses of German Agriculture 
as Seen by a Native Kansan." 

State Secretary Baird, of the Y. M. C. A., 
addressed a large number of young men at the 
association parlors last Sunday afternoon. 
His subject was, " Systematic Bible Study. 

The poultry department is planing on breed- 
ing all the common varieties of chickens this 
coming spring. Several breeders at the State 
show donated some of their best birds to the 
College. 

Prof. J. D. Walters moralizes in this week's 
Industrialist about the number of times he has 
climbed College Hill. Its up to the "Hnrt. 
to figure up the amount of cinder path that he 
has worn out. 

The regular Saturday afternoon chape j 
exercises will commence January 27. All 
sophomores, juniors and seniors who are 
not members in good standing of the literary 
societies, the " Ags." or the Engineers will be 
required to attend. 

According to the lnrtnxtnali#t; "Professor 
TenEyck had his cow tested a short time ago 
and found that she showed a strong reaction. 
We suggest that he sell her or have his life 
insured. The milching of a cow with a ' strong 
reaction" is rather a dangerous business. 

Eva (Riekman) Gilbert and May Harris 
finished their College work last term and now 
belong to the class of 'Oft. Their thesis sub- 
jects are: ''Quantitative Analysis of the Air 
if Some of the Public Buildings In and Near 
Manhattan," May Harris; "Pl»a tor *J 
Planting and Improving of a City Lot, kva 
Gilbert. 

The society "write-ups, " as they come Into 
the Herald office, present varied and awful 
problems to the proof-reader. Some corre- 
spondents use hieroglyphics for which we have 
no kev The Ag. reporter is saving of his 
paper? 'His reports have to be read with a 
compound microscope. The Hamp. man writes 
between the lines, and the A. B. reporter uses 
one in three. Some ha ve taken spel Ting; others 
Should hand in verbal reports and save their 
reputations. The "Io." ve**** •«™gtae* 
-hiirh filutln" and the language double jointed. 
Pour out of six reports had to be rewritten this 
week. 

Sixteen delegates are expected to represent 
K S A. C. at The Student Volunteer Movement 
Convention at Nashville. Tenn. An effort is 
being made to have the «evera organiza icms o 



I College represented by one or more de 
» Mrs. Wilder's Sunday-school c 



voted to send one delegate. The Y. K.C. *. 
will send two or more, and the Y. W. G. A. one 
or two The fraternities have agreed to send 
one of their number. The only qualifications of 
a de^ are that tiny are Christian £»*«*•; 
As a general proposition, each delegate is 
expected to pay half of his Expenses, which 
will be about $13.00. 






230 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 







Twenty -five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lay in a good supply now? Our Hand- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 



10 per cent off 

on 

Shoes 



i 




Prof. C. M. Brink Mays that he has made a 
study of the Devil. 

The Ag. Association lias changed its time of 
meeting to Saturday afternoon. 

"Pat" Brown and Jim Cheney paid their 
regular annual visit to church, last Sunday. 

The Websters are wearing their society color, 
green, to-day in honor of Webster's birthday. 

Miss Blanche Stevens entertained a very few 
friends at an informal breakfast last Friday. 

During the holidays all the woodwork in the 
creamery building was given a dark oak stain. 
Four pasteurizers were installed at the same 
time. o • *: 

Invitations are out announcing the wedding 
of Miss Carrie Carls and Carl Wheeler, at the 
home of the bride's parents, near Morgan- 
ville. 

Lloyd Whipple, first- year student, who has 
been in the Park View hospital for some time 
on account of typhoid fever, is recovering and 
expects to be out again in a few weeks. 

About fifty "preps.,'* sub-freshmen and a 
first year tried to chastise a pair of "sophs." 
last Friday evening, for stealing '09 caps. The 
"sophs." were "wrapt in thought," otherwise 
their costume was nil. The city marshal ad- 
journed the assembly at 11:59. 

W. L. Hull will weild the gavel for the 
sophomores this term. Edith Justin will act 
as "sub" when Willie is out of the game. 
Grace Hawkins will act as scribe and report 
the games. Herman Praeger will "snake" the 
dimes from each wily "soph." Marie Bard- 
shear will "kill, burn or otherwise destroy" 
any and all "galoots" who try to rush the side' 
lines and get in the way of the players. 

There are ninety first- term short-course far- 
mers here this winter. The ag«s range from 17 
to 52 years, with an average of 21.9. This 
average shows that the young fawner of to-day 
who is just starting out for himself realizes 
that there are new methods to learn and that 
he believes in going to college for a short time ' 
at least. The average age of the twenty-two ! 
dairy -short-course students is 22.5. The oldest 
is 32 and the youngest 18 years. The average 
pf the regular first-year students is somewhat 
higher than usual, being 20.2 years. The a^es I 
range from 13 to 26 years. The average age of 
the girls is, of course, 16 vears. 



Alumni and Former Students. 

G. O. Kramer, '05. is visiting his alma 
mater. 

„£',.**■ Swift » ' w * is working in a bank at 
Williamsburg. 

Lena Finley, '05, hasH'harge of the fresh- 
man cooking classes this term. 

Grace Allingham, '04. andCrete Spencer, '05. 
are among the preparatory teachers this term. 

F. E. B aimer, '05, says he is helping his 
father build a barn and house, at their home 
near Woodston. „ 

Adella Blaealy, '01, returned Saturdav from 
Kansas City, where she has been wi'th her 
mother, who was in the hospital there. 

Fred Van Dorp, '05, passed through Man- 
hattan last week on his way home from Wyom- 
ing, where he has been working for his father. 
He says he expects to farm this spring. 

Claude Thummel, '05, Glen Edgerton and 
Carl Duehn, '04, who are at West Point, report 
that they made it through the "Xmas exams" 
without any trouble, and like their work better 
all the time. 

Odds and Ends. 

"Happiness is not having what we like, but 
liking what we have."— Ex. 

Attention is the stuff that memory is made 
of, and memory is accumulated genius. Un- 
til. 

Customer in restaurant— "Look here, waiter. 
I have found a button in this salid." Waiter-' 
"That's part of the dressing." 

Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps, 
for he is the only animal that is struck with 
the difference between what things are and 
what they should be.—HozKtt. 

There is a recent rule at Dartmouth which 
requires each undergraduate to pay an annual 
fee of five dollars for athletics. The faculty 
members were chief instigators of the move"- 
ment.— Ex. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



231 



NEW AND 2«T 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



R. E. LOFINCK 



SPECTACLES 
GOLD PENS 



DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



Solitude is a place where they never adver- 
tise.—^. 

The half that doen not know how the other 
half lives generally suspects that it is on bor- 
rowed money.— JB*. 

At Illinois University a carnival was ffiven 
for the benefit of the Athletic Association, and 
to start a fund for the erection of a club house 
and training quarters. — Ex 

At the University of California, athletics 
has come to be classed an a study. Athletes, 
whether on the track, diamond, or grid iron r 
are marked according to their work.— Ex. 

PROFESSIONAL. 
DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



,u years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms I and 4 in Union National .Bank Building. Pine 
gold work a specialty. 



^ aAiM ^_ M 



. i 



Res. Phone, Colt 30fl Res. Phone, Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 



Rebuilding Sale 

$12.50, $1150 and $15 Suits Now $10 



We have gone through our stock 
and where one or two of a kind are 
left (of the above named prices) 
we have bunched them in one lot 
and price. 



" 



Ofhce in Union Nat!, 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



S. N. Higinbotham 

FLOUR GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL. 

Phone 55 Phone 55 



30 Suits 
at $10 

All our Suits and Overcoats, includ- 
ing our fine black Suits at 20 per 
cent oil. Sweaters, 30 per per cent 
off. Shoes, rubbers, suit cases, 
fancy vests, at 10 per cent off. 



E L. Knostman 



STUDENTS 

Get your WOOD of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

PWHNF fi MANHATTAN, KAN. 



70S N. THIRD ST. 



VARNEY'S - BOOKSTORE 

College Text-Books and College Supplies 



-I 



We carry the famous 

Keuftel & Esser Drawing Materials. 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens, 
Varney Fountain Pens only ft, 
Henry Sears & Co. Warranted Knives. 
K. S. A. C. Writing Tablets and Envelopes. 
College Souvenir Postal-Cards, 

Varney's Bookstore, 



We carry 

Co-ordinate paper, 
Single-leaf Note-books. 
Hi twin its' India Ink. 
"Koh-I-noor Drawing Pencils, 
Eye Shades. 
Lamp Shades, etc., etc. 



311 Poyntz Ave. 



J 



232 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



_ A- - - ^'- *> . - 



The Place to Buy Your College Supplies is at the 



STUDENTS' 

CO-OPERATIVE 

BOOKSTORE 



We are the acknowledged headquarters for 
all College Supplies. 



Drawing sets, Paper, Inks, Rules, Stationery, etc. 
etc. If we haven't what you want we can get ft for 
you; special orders receive prompt attention. 



Also have WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN 



-It is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Peed, Seeds & Puel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 



J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch «fc Jewelry Repairing 



Special Rates to Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 

BOYLE, Prop. 
EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 



SEEDS 



THAT 
GROW 

Elevator on C. R. I. ft P. Ry. 

Geo, T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 113-15 N. Second St. 

GASOLINE STOVES 

-Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

41 ENGEL BROTHERS 



Manhattan 



Transfer 



Line 



Electric- Lighted & Heated Buses & Hacks 
D ay and Night Baggage Line 






Meet all trains day or night. LARGE 
WAGONETTS and PARK PHAE- 
TONS suitable for class parties etc. 
Let us call your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a specialty. 



H. J. Barnhouse L. W. Phillips 



r r 



»•■■»< 



I 



I 

I 




L L 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



S^S ^ V»^^S^W^^^^^^^S>>h^^W^^S^^W 



Wc make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



*±. 



Phone 167 



All Kinds of 




Ice C 



ream 



Oysters 



7F 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



^>^^■w*^w'N^^^^N*%^l^l^^^^*W ^ W■'Ml■'^rf^^^ 






^. " Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
OUniain. ICE CREAM SODAS 



I 



I 



I 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



«I 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. fl If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
% Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest % Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by [sending! for "a DEiLAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 

1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drumra Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 I'ork Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 






« BBBIMIM gttBHttBBHBHBtMHHIW«MttMBtg 



I 

I 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. X X X X 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. XXX 




i 



*l^^*t>*^*t^>i^^> t K*t*l*«»t^H* t * S 4 



IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING x x 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enable* us to meet their wants exactly. X X 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



iPHOTOGRAPHIcI 

ESUPPLIES ALWAYS FRESHB 

1 —| 

1 



Underwear 
Handkerchiefs 
Room Furnishings 
Ladies' Golf Gloves 
Knit Shawls & Scarfs 



Ribbons 
Neckwear 
Souvenir Goods 
Fancy Work Materials 
Japanese Basket Telescopes 



Jj Pencils 

S Tablets 

J^ Note -Books 
Jr Lunch Boxes 

£j Fancy Box Stationery 

8 i« 

jj You are Always Safe on Price and Quality at S 

J THE BIG 

£ C. B. 



RACKETS 



H 



S 



N 4 



*^^fi*«^^«^^ 





%he Students' Herald 



I 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College J£ 3£ 





I 



!. 



i 





Keuffel & Esser Co. 

# OF NB3fl£ YORK *< 

813 Locust Street, - Saint Louis, Mo. 



DRAWING 

INSTRUMENTS 

"Paragon" 
"Key Brand" 
"Xrfew Brand" 




DRAWING 
PAPERS 

"Anvil'* 
"Duplex" 
*\ Paragon" 
"Universal" 



SLIDE RULES, FLAT AND TRIANGULAR SCALES, TEE SQUARES, 
DRAWING BOARDS, TRIANGLES, COLUMBIA DRAWING INKS U«b> 

600-PAGE CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION 



9SE 



-U-U 

"M ■ ■■ 




» 



s 



The Jewelry Store where 
you find the K. S. A. C. 
Souvenirs. :: :; :; :: 



Phis 

Scarf Pins 
Hat Plus 
Fob* 
Spoons, etc. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry 
Repairing a Specialty 

I ASKREN 

The Jeweler and Optictaa- 



■w 



■B-L'-JJ ,' 'g 



-SBB 



Bilger's Hack 



AND 



Baggage Line 



Cab meets all trams day 
axd tight WiD call any 
place in town for passea- 
X X 



Fare, 25 cents 

Largest wagonette m the 
city. Suitable for class 
parties, etc Charges 
moderate, X 



Phone 



226 



• 



■ 



Ariaa 



'*" r-T^RWW 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



£33 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photo* 
graphs made* You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolfs Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market, 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 



PHONE 



33 



RB. ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



SlOPoyntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths for one dollar. Fine tine of cigars and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNQCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 

AT 

Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street, in Union Na- 
tional Bank Building. 

Porcelain bath tubs, tine tine clears and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 per month salary assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. * En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in demand, Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poynta P, C. HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 



Special Prices to Students 
the Wagons. 



Walt for 
Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



QO TO 



H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 

Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best X X 

W. M. STINGLEY 8r CO 






234 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



= IT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADE WITH 




Dry-Goods Room. 

Special prices on many arti- 
cles to close out before Invoic- 
ing. Lot at ladies' gloves re- 
duced from |Utt and #1 to 75 
cents and 59 cents. Toadies' 
hand bugs from M cents and $t 
at 40 cents and' W) cents. 

Royal Worcester Corsets with 
hose supporters, 50 cents and ff. 

Ready-to- Wear Room. 

Special sale on Ladles' suits. 

M suits for $18 

•a " " $8 

Biw bargains in Winter Cloaks. 
McCall Patterns. 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 



Shoe Room. 

TEN per cent OFF on all our 
Shoes this month. 

Krippendorf-Dittmann Co. 's 
ladies' shoes are the best you 
can buy. 

Gymnasium Slippers. 



Hardware Room. 

Keen Kutter goods. Pocket- 
knives. Razors, Shears. Scissors. 
Saws. Axes. Edge tools. Stoves 
and Ranges. Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters. We will save 
you money on Guns and loaded 
Shells. 



Grocery Room. 

A complete assortment of 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
Oranges. Bananas. Lemons and 
Apples. All fruits In season. 

Murdock's Club Coffee. 1-pound 
packages, Murdock's Nectar 
Coffee. 1-pound packages. Mur- 
dock's Hecla Coffee, i-pound 
packages, Murdock's Bulk 
Coffees, Murdock's O. P. T. Ex- 
tracts. Money back if not 
satisfactory. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting;, writing and toilet rooms upstairs. 

Phone 88 for Groceries, Flonr, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for JDry- Goods, K end. v -to -wear Goods, Shoes, Hardware. 



Students 

WE WILL SELL YOU A $15 
UNIFORM FOR $12 AND 



Don't 

Forget 

Our Large stock of 

FULL VAMP 
SHOES 

at cash prices. X 



Moore Bros* & Co, 



SPALDING'S 




Official 

Athletic 

Almanac 

FOR 1906^^SS= 



Edited by JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

Price 10 cents 



Send your name and address 
to our nearest store for 
Spalding's Catalogue of all 
Athletic Sporta— it's free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 

Washington 

Boston 

Kansas City 

Buffalo 

Syracuse 



Chicago 
New Orleans 
Minneapolis 
Cincinnati 
Denver 
Montreal, Can. 



St. Louis 
Sun Francisco 
Baltimore 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburg 
London. Eng. 




Published 
Each Thursday Br 
Jhe Students Or The 
Agricultural College 

MottorbecEveiy One Cultivate His OumGmxa* 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., January 25, 1906. 



Number 18 



The John Barrett Prizes for 1906. 

Three prizes— a first prize of $100, a second 
prize of $75, and a third prize of $50— have 
been established by the Hon. John Barrett, 
United States Minister to Columbia, to be 
awarded to the authors of the best papers on 
any one of the subjects named below. Mr. 
Barrett states the object of the prizes to be "to 
promote the study of the history, peoples, 
politics, resources and possibilities of our 
sister Republics," and to develop throughout 
the United States "a wider interest in our 
political and commercial relations with Latin- 
America, and to foster a more general study 
of Latin- American history, institutions, po- 
litical, social and educational conditions, 
material and industrial resources, and com- 
mercial possibilities-especial ly as they affect 
the growth of closer ties of international com- 
itv and confidence." 

The prizes are offered subject to the follow- 
ing rules of competition : 

(1) The competition is open to any student, 
man or woman, roistered during the academic 
year £906-9 in any American college, univer- 
sity, or technical school. Undergraduate, 
professional and graduate students are alike 

eligible. 

(2) Papers submitted by competitors must 

not exceed 10,000 words in length. 

(3) Papers, accompanied by the full name 
and address of the writer and statement of the 
class and college, university, or technical 
school to which the writer belongs, must be 
mailed or delivered to an express company not 
later than September 1, WOK, addressed to the 
President of Columbia University, New York, 
N. Y„ marked "For the John Barrett Prize." 

(4)"The prizes will be awarded by a Com- 
mittee of Judges chosen for the purpose, and 
the results will be announced through the 



public press as soon after October 1, 1006, as 
practicable. 

(f) The paper awarded the first prize will be 
transmitted by the undersigned to the Director 
of the Bureau of American Republics, who will 
cause it to be published and circulated as one 
of the publications of that Bureau. 

{(i) All papers submitted in competition, 
other than the one to which the first prize is 
awarded, will lis destroyed as soon as the 
prizes have be?n awarded, unless, at the time 
of sending, a competitor asks for the return of 
the manuscript and furnishes a fully stamped 
and properly addressed envelope. 
( 7 ) Papers must be submitted in typewritten 

form. 
Any one of the following subjects may be 

chosen : 

I. POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC. 

(a) The Monroe Doctrine and its influence 
on the political and economic development of 
Latin- America. 

(b) The influence of the Panama Canal on the 
commercial and political development of Latin- 
America. 

(c) Present conditions and future possibili- 
ties of the trade of the United States with 
South America. 

( d ) The present material and economic prog- 
ress of South America. 

(e) The practicability and utility of the pro 
posed Pan-American Railway. 

H. HISTORICAL. 

( a) The influences and conditions that worked 
for the independence and establishment of the 
South American Republics. 

( b ) The influences and conditions that worked 
for the independence and establishment of the 
Central American Republics and Mexico. 

(c) The character and achievements of Boll- 



336 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



var as shown in the struggle for the independ- 
ence of Northern South America. 

(d) The character and achievements of San 
Martin as shown in the struggle for the inde- 
pendence of Southern South America. 

(e) The conditions surrounding and circum- 
stances influencing the overthrow of the Empire 
and establishment of the Republic in Brazil. 

Nicholas Murray Butler, 

President of Columbia University. 

Albert Shaw. 

Editor of the Review of Rerletm. 

John Huston Finley, 

President of the New Vorft City College. 

November 25, LW)5. 



Basket-ball. 

The following is the basket-ball schedule, as 
arranged by General Manager Dean: 

at home. 

St. John's Military Academy Jan. 25 

Clay Center High School Feb. 5 

Friends University Feb. 15 

Washburn College Feb. 21 

State Normal March 1 

Baker University March 8 

Kansas University March 23 

AWAY from home. 

Ft. Riley, at Ft. Riley... Jan. 29 

State Normal, at Emporia March 14 

Washburn, at Toneka March 15 

A game may b3 secured with Haskell, to be 

played here, and it is probable that another 

game will be played on the trip to be taken in 

March. This game will be either with Ottawa 

or Baker. 

College Won. 

Nearly three hundred people attended the 
basket-ball game at Commercial Club hall last 
Friday evening and saw the College boys win 
from Ft. Riley by a score of 46 to 10. The 
game was an interesting one, and it clearly 
showed that basket-ball can be made a success 
here. We have a fast team, and if the interest 
keeps up we will undoubtedly have an oppor- 
tunity to see some good games. 

The game was rather easily won, and at no 
time were the soldiers ahead. The score at 
the end of the first half was 28 to 7. The sol- 
diers took a brace at the beginning of the 
second half, and for a time their pace was 
almost too fast for our boys, but they soon 
tired and the score against them gradually 
grew larger. 

The best work for the visitors was done by 
Flaherty, and he also made the most fouls. 
He was fast and did not lose his head. Weir 
also played a good game at forward. 

For the College, Ferris did fine work He 
threw a number of difficult goals and his play- 
ing at all times was fast and sure. Carr, the 



other forward, also played well. He threw 
three goals from the field. Cain, at center, 
bad things all his own way. After the first 
few plays his opponent seemed to give up and 
scarcely touched the ball. Topping and Blake 
played the guards and both did good work. 
They had few chances to distinguish them- 
selves, but they guarded their goal well, espe- 
cially in the first half. 
The line-up and score was as follows : 

Field Free-throw 

Ft. Rilet. goals, goals. Fouls 

Weir. If 4* o 3 

McGregor, rf ] o t 

Erdman c 2 5 

Flaherty (Capt)lg o 5 10 

Hillrg 5 

Total 7 5 24 

k. s. a. c. 

Ferrisrf 12 g e 

Currlf 3 5 

Cain c 3 6 

Topping rg 1 4 

Blake lg 2 

Total 19 8 23 

The Engineers* Association. 

The meeting was called to order promptly at 
8:00 P. M., by President Carlson, Saturday 
evening, January 20. Owing to a mistake of 
the program committee, a hastily prepared 
but interesting program was given. The eve- 
ning's entertainment consisted of a paper on 
Cooper He wit lights, written especially for the 
Engineers' Association, by Chas. M. Weeks, 
a former student now acting as district sales 
agent for the Cooper Hewit Light Company, 
with offices in Boston. In addition, interest- 
ing- discussions were given by Newland on 
steam boiler economy; by C. I. Weaver, on 
fire alarm telegraph; and by Carlson, on long- 
distance power transmission in California. 
Two new members were elected and the usual 
requisite business performed before adjourn- 
ment at 9:30. Watch the bulletin boards for 
interesting programs. E. A. WRIGHT. 



The Websters Piay to a Crowded House. 

At 8:00 o'clock Saturday evening, when 
President Kirk's gavel fell, standing room in 
the Webster hall was at a premium. After 
roll-call and prayer by J. E. George, we 
listened to one of the best programs of the 
year. Carrol Walker won the toss and chose 
the autobiography of Bill Nye. James Lupfer 
followed witti a biographical sketch of Daniel 
Webster. Fred Houser then introduced to the 
society L. W. Lawson, who favored us with a 
flute solo, accompanied by Miss Li 11 at the 
piano. L. M. Jorgenson told us of the ext?nt 
to which College spirit should be carried. The 
Webster Glee Club then made its debut and 
responded to an encore. Then came the treat 
of the evening— an address by Professor 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



237' 



Kararaeyer, which was certainly fine. H. H. 
Cot* well then permitted the "Coop. Chuck 
House Quintette" to afflict us with a sample of 
their misery. Next we were entertained by a 
play, "The Funnygraph," presented by Mr. 
Blachly, supported by an excellent company 
of artists. This was followed by music, intro- 
duced by D. M. Neer and furnished by Miss 
Helen Sweet, accompanied by Miss Nicolet. 
A. O. Nash came next with a miscellaneous 
number. Miss Golden then favored us with a 
reading from "Mrs, Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch." C. B. Kirk closed the program with 
the "Reporter," and we had barely time to 
elect about a dozen new members before the 
lights went out. P. w. C. 

Y. W. C. A. Notes. 

The Y. W. C. A. will send at least two dele- 
gates to the Nashville convention. 

Next Saturday noon the meeting will be in 
charge of Laura Lyman. It is sure to be an 
interesting one and every girl is invited to at- 
tend. 

Margaret Cunningham led the last Saturday 
noon meeting. Her subject was "The Christ- 
Filled Life." The attendance was very good, 
as it has been at all the gatherings lately. 

Burodetphian Society. 

The Eurodelphians were called to order by 
President Boline Hanson. After the usual 
opening exercises, the following were initiated 
and became Eurodelphians: Mary Hamilton, 
Caroline Morton, Ethel Barbor, Gabriella 
Venard, and Alice Marvin. We then listened 
to a vocal duet by the Misses Stump. The so- 
ciety paper, "The Delphite," edited by Helen 
Huse, was very good and enjoyed by all. The 
Hamilton quartet then favored us with two se- 
lections. 
After a business session we adjourned. 



of horses and insisted that we use, at least, 
horse sense when raising and caring for horses. 

A lecture on sanitary conditions on the farm 
was given by Asa Zimmerman. Mr. Hall im- 
pressed us with the fact that the short course 
did pay and was a lasting benefit to all who 
attended. "Does Cooperation Pay?" was the 
subject of a discussion by Irvine Dressher 

A short business session followed and ad- 
journment at five o'clock. A. J. Reed. 



Agricultural Association. 

We were called to order at two -thirty by 
"Prexy" Snodgrass. After ascertaining who 
was there and who was not, some recently 
elected officers were installed and six new mem- 
bers were elected and initiated. The program 
was opened with music, furnished by Messrs. 
Cudney and May ham. The next number was a 
debate by E. E. Greenough and A. J. Reed. 
They discussed the advisability of supporting 
creamery trusts as compared with coopera- 
tive and private creameries. The Hamilton 
quartet was prevailed upon by W. B. 
Garnet to furnish us entertainment, which they 
did to our entire satisfaction. Assistant 
Wheeler gave us a practical talk on the care 



The sofa held the twain 
Mnanda and her love-sick swain. 

Heandshe 
But hark! a step upon the stair 
And papa finds them sitting mere 
He and — she! 



— Ex. 



Alpha Betas 

Clank! went the gavel promptly at two 
o'clock and the A. B's. nestled down into their 
places and the ball began to roll. A song was 
sung by the society and "Pat" invoked divine 
guidance, after which Miss Harris arose from 
common life to the plane of an A. B. of good 
standing. Miss Kahl's color-and-design lec- 
ture and Miss Harlan's declamation deserve 
honorable mention. We wish to extend the 
thanks of the society to Mr. Jackson and Miss 
Brown for favoring us with music. In extem- 
poraneous speaking the girls were the "whole 
cheese," but the boys managed to get in a 
word or two in the business session which fol- 
lowed. M. Q. S. 

What the tiamps Did. 

In accordance with a time-honorerd custom, 
the Hamps met and proceeded to spend the eve- 
ning in revelry and to apply their knowledge 
of parliamentary law. 

One stranger was taken from the cruel world 
into the brotherhood. The new piano was in- 
itiated by Miss Li 11 and Mr. Lawson, who were 
followed by the Misses Palmer and Farrar. C. 
E. Whipple read a paper on his old hobby- 
football— and E. C. Farrar gave a book review 
of Mr. Webster's novel, the unabridged dic- 
tionary. "The Coop. Chuck House Quintette 
and Jubilee Singers" sang so long, loud and 
extensively that every thing seemed to be com- 
ing their way. Joe L.111 "explattered" at some 
length upon the subject of "Hereditary Predis- 
position to Gaseocephalus as Exacerbated by 
Military Drill." More music was furnished 
by the Misses Ward and Hilliard. Praeger 
dwelt upon the moist elements of the presi- 
dent's message, but after all this, Green 
kicked. J * H * c * 

Men often miss opportunity's knock because 
they are themselves so busy "knockiug"; 
— Selected. 



238 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Motto: LfTCvtBV 
0<* Cultivate Hu 
OwnOc*iw ■ + * 

Printed in College Printing Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, Ave cents. 



F. A. Kiknb. Jr. .'06 Editor-in-chief 

GHOVKR Kahl. W Business Manairer 

E. C. Fa it ra it *i)7 Literary Krtitor 

L. K Gaston. '('ft Local Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. 'OK Exchange Editor 

C. E. Whipple. *nr Assoc. Business Manager 

J. S. Montgomery. W Subscription Manager 

Grace Hawkins. '08 » *„„„„ T „„„i ml , 

A. G. PHILLIPS, 'Or f • Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizahkth Swkkt. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jab. R. Cox en. '08 Reporter 

All orders for subscriptions nnd inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
shou'd be bunir on the editor-in-chief's hook not late-* 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark across this item means that your subscrip- 
tion Is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager, 

Eliza bbth Sweet. '04. alumni editor, will be triad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



Manhattan, Kan., Jan. 25, 1006, 




Get your tickets for the Oratorical Contest 
and come prepared to make things interesting. 

Here are first congratulations for the winner 
of the Oratorical Contest. 



Criticism adverse and complimentary has 
been handed out to the Herald on one or two 
points of late, and this calls for a little decla- 
ration on the part of the staff. The report of 
the last lecture was written up according to the 
views of the "reporter, which could only be 
expected to meet approval and disapproval. 
We hold that the publication did not, or at 
least should not, reflect discredit on or damage 
the Lecture Course, and we further feel that 
the paper deserves consideration. If every- 
thing that appears in its columns must be of 
stereotyped expression, such that the reader 
knows before looking what to expect, the 
publication will be dead in expression and 
lackiDg in interest. Adverse criticism is better 
than none. 



It is getting to be a difficult matter to trav- 
erse the main hall this term between class 
hours, especially when any subject of general 
interest is under consideration. Out of consid- 
eration for thR instructors, class hours and 
those who desire to be prompt at classes it 
would be well for those who desire to discuss 
any subject to stand against the wall or retire 
to the recesses of the hall. Even if everyone 
keeps moving in the hall, jams are of frequent 
occurrence at the close of class hours. If all 
would observe the general rule to keep to the 
right while passing through the hall a serious 
problem would be satisfactorily and easily 
solved. If a little conscious attention be given 
to the matter, it will soon be second nature to 
move always on the right side of the crowd. 



Our Musical Department is busily at work 
in preparation for its second annual concert, 
to be given March 8, and we are convinced 
that this will be the treat of the season. An 
artist from Chicago is expected to take part, 
soloists in the department and College are do- 
ing faithful work, and all concerned in it are 
enthusiastic and determined to make it the 
greatest hit of the year. Wide advertisement 
is being taken and visitors from all parts of 
the State are expected to attend. No stud?nt 
in the College should choose to remain away, 
for no good thing can flourish without encour- 
agement. If our most excellent Musical De- 
partment could be removed from among us 
with all its musical talent, we would come to a 
sudden realization of the amount it contributes 
to the pleasure and enjoyment of College 
life. Every one, whether musical or not, 
should get interested in this coming event and 
by this interest help materially in making all 
musical undertakings a success. 



Local notice gives the information that 
Washington's birthday is to be observed in a 
suitable manner this year. It is highly proper 
that something of the kind should be under- 
taken by the Faculty and students. We are too 
prone to relegate historic characters to the 
background, calling them ''dead horses" and 
'•back numbers," and may well pause to take 
inspiration from the lives of our country's 
heroes, soldiers, and statesmen. No conversa- 
tion or address is so pleasant or entertaining 
as that of the person who can at opportune 
moments refer to striking instances of historic 
note or intersperse pregnant extracts from the 
thoughts of great minds. No student can do 
better than to acquire a ready knowledge of 
history, both of the past and present day, 
placing special energy on the lives of men that 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



239 



have done things in the past and who are 
doing things to-day. Several dates in the 
present month and in that succeeding should 
bs of special int?rest to us, ami it would be 
well if each could be observed in somfi slight 
way. Prominent among them is Kansas Day 
and the birthdays of Me Kin ley and Lincoln. 



The freshmen and sophomores seem to have 
the field just at present, and to say the least 
their operations are most disgraceful. A 
friendly pushing and shoving is not so objec- 
tionable, but when the point is reached where 
slugging, kicking and choking hecome offen- 
sive and defensive tactics it is time to call a 
halt. The fight last Saturday would be more 
characteristic of a mob of street Arabs than of 
a band of sensible and earnest college men. 
Although the fight, for it must be called that, 
resulted in no serious consequences, and in 
spite of the fact that representative students 
had no hand in it, the subject has been eagerly 
seized upon by the papers resulting in serious 
compromise of the College and students. The 
story, as it comes out, is magnified, as are 
all stories of the kind, and coming as it does 
from the College correspondent is most objec- 
tionable. OF course, it is no object for the 
writer to consider the feelings of the student 
body nor the reputation of the school so long 
as he receives the regular remittance per 
column of material sent in. This matter would 
very much better have been left for local 
settlement than to have b«n dished out in 
spicy form for the benefit of a glutinous public. 
It is up to the better class of students to form 
a vigilence committee that a repetition of the 
affair may be prevented. 



Faith shares the future's promise; Love's 
self-offering is a triunph won: 

And each good thought or action moves 
The dark world nearer to the sun- 

-./. G, Whittter. 




Enrolment for Winter Term. 

Girls. Boys. Total 

Preparatory 31 153 18+ 

Freshmen 168 440 608 

Sophomore 58 120 

Junior....' 48 90 147 

Senior 33 68 101 

Graduate 2 4 6 

Special 19 H fg 

D. S. short course 43 .... 4.S 

Farmers' short course ■ . . 143 - 146 

Totals 402 1041 1443 

The dangers of knowledge are not to be 
compared with the dangers of ignorance. Man 
is more likely to miss his way in darkness than 
in twilight, in twilight than in full sun,— 
Whately. 



I can't imagine why His. 

I surely cannot tell; 
But every time I try a rhyme 

It really sounds like 

No. that won't do, 

And when again in rhythmic strain 

I try to spin a yarn; 
The peoyle that ate listing 

Don't seem to give a 

No. that won't do. 

So now I guess I'll give it up. 

I'm not in my right class; 
I'll hie me buck to simple prose 

Before I'm called an 

No.tnai, won't do. 

The man who makes nothing but money is 
poorly paid. 

The best day of life lies between yesterday 
and to-morrow. 

Christianity and churchanifcy are as wide 
apart as the poles. 

The boy who is ashamed of his work is never 
worth giving some other job. 

When men once turn to brutes, trifles of 
man's wit that remains in them adds tenfold to 
their brutality '—Hawthorne. 

':Generally speaking, women are—" 
"Yes they are." 
"Are what?" 
"Generally speaking".— J£r. 

Morality, at the utmist, only develops the 
character in one or two directions. It may per- 
fect a single virtue here and there, but it can- 
not perfect all.— Henry Drummand. 

Students— I dont think I deserve an ad- 
solute zero. 

Professor— No, Sir; neither do I. But it is 
the lowest mark I am allowed to give. Good 
d ay . — Ex. 

S-me moden maxims: "Do it to-morrow." 
"Speak well of all— if you have no scruples." 
"If you can't knock, say something." "Silence 
is seldom." "Never do to-morrow any body 
you can do lo-day," "Better to have loved and 
lost than to make bad mistake."— Ex. 

A Harvard sophomore was reciting a mem- 
orised oration in one of the classes in public 
speaking. After the first two sentances his 
memory failed, and a look of despair came 
over his face. He began as follows: "Ladies 
and Gentlemen: Washington is dead Lincon 
is dead— "then, forgetting, he hesitated a mo- 
ment and continued, "and-M 'am deginning to 
feel sick myself."— iffic. 



11 



THE STUDENTS* H&RALD. 




Talking* machines. Frost & Davis. 

The juniors expect to have a dance in the 
near future. 

Miss Etta Campbell, junior in '00, visited at 
College Saturday. 

Misses Eunice Gates and Delia Cree visited 
around College Saturday. 

Nannie Carnahan spent Sunday and Monday 
in the country, visiting friends. 

Miss V. Brooks, who has been quite sick 
with mumps, is now recovering. 

Every one who possibly could took advan- 
tage of the fine skating last Monday. 

Asst. Wra. Anderson was visited by R. E. 
Jones, of Irving, Saturday of last week. 

The Athletic Association is canvassing for 
new members at a lively rate these days. 

Mr. Ed. Allison, of Top?ka, visited over 
Sunday with his sister, Miss Ktta Allison. 

Miss Amelia Winter entertained a number of 
friends at her home last Wednesday evening. 

E. C. Farrar is in eharge of the Y. M. C. A. 
general secretary's work during McLean's ab- 
sence. 

Mr. W. R. Hildreth, '02, was around town 
looking up old acquaintances the first part of 
the week. 

Lulu Smith, student in '03, was married, 
January 18, to Myron Landis, at her home in 
Hamlin, Kan. 

The Horticultural Department has purchased 
a new drag, made of oak planks and lined out 
with steel shoes. 

According to reliable reports, the juniors 
will give a dance in Commercial Club Hall, 
next Monday evening. 

The thermometer registered 8 above zero last 
Monday morning. Some students acted as if 
it was about 60 below. 

Van's t?am got excitsd and ran away one day 
last wesk. Van said that bis baseball training 
came handy in catching them. 

Professor McCormick and Assistant Brant 
had charge ot Professor Remick's classes dur- 
ing the latter' s absence last week. 

Dr. Cyrus Townsend Brady, a noted author 
and writer, visited relatives in Manhattan last 
week. He visited College while here. 

Two twin babies died near Bala last week 
under peculiar circumstances. Part of the 
contents of their stomachs was sent to the 
Chemistry Department for analysis. 



The "woods" were full of farmers, Tuesday 
and Wednesday. They were here for the 
meetings of the Corn Breeders' Association. 

t State Treasurer Kelley was found to be about 
sixty thousand dollars short in bis accounts. 
We have not seen any of it around K. S. A. C. 

Co. I, K. N. G., have their regular quarterly 
pay-night to-night. To the College boys who 
are members it comes as useful "side money." 

Assistant Eastman was called home last week 
on account of the serious illness of his parents. 
Professor Dickens has been teaching his 
classes. 

Assistant Metick says that there are thirty- 
five dairy short-course students this term, in- 
stead of twenty-two, as stated in last week's' 
Herald. 

Robert Emsl'e is assistant taxidermist! for 
the Department of Zoology this year. He has 
bi^en at work lately mounting eight hawks and 
two owls. 

A halibut measuring over five feet in length 
and weighing one hundred twenty-five pounrls 
was on exhibition at one of the down-town meat 
markets last week. 

Professor Carlton, of the IT. S. Department 
of Agriculture, made a visit to the C College last 
Monday. He came to see about the Garden 
City Experiment Station. 

Last Sunday evening H. E. Potter tried to 
separate a pair of electric live wires with a 
pair of pincers. As soon as he was able ha 
promised to leave such things alone for all 
time. 

The K. S. A. C. correspondent of tha Kansas 
City 8t(tr does not seem to care what he says 
about our "internal troubles." Faculty pre- 
dictions and the list of killed and injured 
should be kept at home. 

Say. Mr. Student, did you know that the 
Herald is the only local paper in K, S. A. C? 
We want your support and your subscription. 
You cannot afford to depend on your neigh- 
bors or to do without the Herald. Give your 
name and dollar to Joe Montgomery or other 
members of the staff. 

The Alpha Betas gave a social to themselves 
and invited guests. Monday evening, in the 
Domestic Science Hall. The amusements con- 
sisted of matching comic advertisements and 
identifying cartoons representing members of 
the Faculty. Pres. Julia Wendel made a 
speech, after which refreshments, consisting of 
chocolate and wafers, were served. The lights 
"winked" all t?o soon, and the crowd had to 
leave. 

The following program will be given in the 
old chapel, Saturday afternoon : 

Hulda Bennet The Cat Funeral 

W. W. Carlson oh, 

Why Should the Spirit of Mortal be Proud? 
G. B. Grifiith . . . Uncle Padger Hangs a Picture 
U ar i F £™berg Mike's Confession 

?" S" ? ai V d Barbara Frietchie 

L. G. Cook The Army Overcoat 

H. R. Case. .... .The Narrowness of Specialties 

G. G. Goheen The American Flag 

Linn Daughters What is Success? 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



241 



Go 2 C Radium B 4 2 late. 

Edison phonographs. Frost & Davis. 

Th3 Board of Regents are in session this 
we^k. 

The Queer Quartet sang- at the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting Sunday. 

The greenhouse furnished flowers for three 
funerals last week. 

Quotation from Brink: "Take my advice 
and you will succeed." 

Cleveland Ladies' Orchestra at the Auditor- 
ium Tuesday evening. 

The popular Cineraria flowers are again in 
bloom in the College greenhouse. 

Professor Erf attended the Nebraska Dairy- 
men's Convention, at Lincoln, last week. 

The "warmest" and coldest yet. Radium 
and liquid air next Monday. Opera-house. 

Professor Erf is attending the western Butter- 
maker's Convention, held at Kansas City this 
week. 

J. W, Blachly had quite an argument with 
Professor Price as to wnether this was V.M'i or 
190o\ 

Have you noticed the monument erected in 
honor of the "Battle of the Caps," January ID, 
1900? 

Hear Professor Potty at the opera-house 
next Monday night. Radium! Iiadium!! Rad- 
ium!!! 

Professor Kammeyer is busy this week 
coaching the contestants in the oratorical 
contest. 

The Dairy Department wishes to announce 
that the creamery will be closed from 12:30 to 
1:00 P. M. 

Professor Erf attended the American Breed- 
ers' Association last week. He was elected 
treasurer. 

The Jersey cow that was bought from the 
St. Louis Fair is the proud mother of a calf, 
born last week. 

Something over $52.00 was subscribed to the 
running expences of the Y. M. C. A, at the 
meeting last Sunday. 

Tlie oil road is again pounded down into 
shape. The frost coming out of the ground 
last week loosened it. 

Assistant Melick was presented with a hand- 
some watch fob by the New York Review 
Buttermakers' Discussion Club. 

"Dug" Finney, a "used-to-be cop," of whom 
many of the students have more or less fond 
recollections, was married last week. 

The crop production class sent a donation to 
one of the students in order to aid him in 
getting his hair cut. He had his hair cut that 
afternoon. . 

We have noticed by the program that the 
Eurodelphians will have their next meeting on 
Sunday, January 28. We want to know if visit- 
ors will be allowed. 



The Saturday afternoon societies have peti- 
tioned the Athletic Association to schedule 
as few games as possible on Saturdays. 

A shower bath has heen completed in the 
basement of the Dairy building, to be used by 
the short-course and regular dairy students. 

Prof. C. A. Zavitz, of Guelph. Ontario, 
gave the crop production class last Friday an 
interesting lecture on wheat, as grown in 
Canada. 

"Daddy" House was in a jumping contest 
with a couple of students the other day. At 
the first jump his feet went out from under him 
and he fell flat. 

An ex-student of the Colorado Agricultural 
College, now attending this College, states 
that the incidental fee of all the students is 
turned over to athletics. 

"Texas" Baird chased Mallon for about two 
blocks the othn* night, having taken him for a 
sophomore. He, of course, begged Mai Ion's 
pardon wh?n ha caught him. 

Asst. H. R. Watkins was busy keeping his 
office radiator warm last Monday morning 
when the Herald represent! ve called. He was 
unable to resist when "grafted" for a sub- 
scription. 

Mr. Sheldon, of the International Harvester 
Company, of Milwaukee, Wis., made a visit to 
the creamery last week. He said that the dis- 
play of separators was far better than that 
given by the Wisconsin Dairy School. 

Professor Dickens says that he never had 
letters come in as thickly as they do at the 
present time. One man sent in an apple to be 
named, and a man from Tennessee sent a sprig 
of an apple-tree covered with a fungus growth. 

The Domestic Science Department is now 
serving luncheon each day to about twenty-tive 
members of the Faculty. The D. S. girls, 
under the supervision of Mrs. Calvin, have 
charge of these dinners. 

The next attraction on the Society Lecture 
Course is a musical, given by the Cleveland 
Ladies' Orchestra. This is a strictly high -class 
company. You will be more than pleased. 
January 30. The concert will begin at 8:00 
o'clock. 

Prof. B. L. Remick was absent from College 
last week on account of the death of his mother- 
in-law, Mrs. Mary Vandivert. Mrs. Vandivert 
has been a prominent member of the Y. W. C. 
A. advisory board and of social circles in 
Manhattan. 

E. M. Johnston, junior in '03, and Gertrude 
Haul en beck, student in '03, were married at the 
residence, of the bride's parents. Wednesday, 
January 17. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston will be 
at home after February 18, at 1247 South Water 
street, Wichita. 

The Concordia Creamery Company has com- 
pleted its new $40,000 plant and will have a 
grand opening February 1. The dedicatory 
address will he given by Prof. O. Erf of this 
College. Six thousand invitations have b^en 
sent out, and a dairy dinner will be served to 
all who accept. A separator will be given away 
to the person bringing the most people. 



242 



THE STUDENTS 1 HERALD, 



i 



ONE-FOURTH 
.-. OFF /. 



Let=Go Sale 



Twenty-five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lay in a good supply now? Our Hand- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 



* ■ rV L ■ ■ m 

COO NS 4 
« 



10 per cent off 

on 

Shoes 




Barney & Berry skates. Frost & Davis. 

Wanted.— A girl to work for her board. 
Call at 800 Bluemont Ave. 

Boxing- gloves, Indian clubs, dumb bells, 
punching bags. Frost & Davis. 

Prof. Oscar Etf is rather dejected these days. 
His wife is visiting home folks in Ohio. 

H. P. Evans was here Tuesday and Wednes- 
day of last week visiting his son, R K. Evans. 

H. E. Hershberger returned to his home in 
Eskridge last week on account of sickness. 

About twenty students spent a pleasant 
afternoon skating at Eureka Lake last Wednes- 
day. 

Josie Holland and Gussie Amos attended the 
Carls- Wheeler wedding in Morgansville last 
week. 

Professor McCormick's brother fell over a 
clothes line and broke his collar hone one day 
last week. 

i 

Michael Floersch, vice-president of the 
Union National bank, died at his home in 
O.naha, last week. 

A new plate glass front is being put in the 
Stmgley hardware store. Interior improve- 
ments are also being made. 

The name of E. R. Nichols appears in the 
list of newly elected directors of the First 
National Bank. 

O.ving to the large number of students h3re, 
Lover's Lane is to he enlarged and improved. 
The walk received a very touching write-up in 
t.iis week's Industrialist. 

Some Junction City parties have purchased 
the Manhattan Metcury. They take charge 
tc-day. There is room for much moral Im- 
provement in the tons of that sheet. 



Radium Lecture. 

Through the influence of Professor Eyer the 
students of this College and people of Manhat- 
tin are soon to have an opportunity of hearing 
Professor Patty ii his great lecture on "Ra- 
dium, Liquid Air, and Wireless Telegraphy." 
Professor Patty's success this year has been 
phenomenal. Come out and see this up-to-date 
demonstration. Keep up with the times. Re- 
served seats, 75 and 50 cents. Tickets on sale 
by a number of students. 



Alumni and Former Students. 



The following is from a letter from Roland 
McKee, '00. who has bwn working in the 
Horticultural Department and taking post- 
graduate work here for the last vear or so. 
He left for Washington, D. C, the fust of the 
year, where he went to report tor duty on a 
civil service appointment: 

C Hico, C A l. , J a nu ary . 

I arrived in Chico. a week ago Sunday, so 
am getting sort of acclimated. Had a fine trip 
to Washington, and again out here. While in 
Washington I saw a number of Manhattan 
people and had a real nice time However, I 
was not. altogether struck on the East, for I 
didn't like the looks ot their red clay, of which 
they evidently have an abundance*. I would 
hate to have the job of making corn grow on it 
if I was depending on that for my bread and 
salt. 

Here at Chico it is cool, but not cold. There 
are lots of oranges and olives just getting 
ripe. Roses nnd wild violets are in bloom, 

I arn with the Division of Seed and Plant 
Introduction. Am with the agrostologist, C. 
V. Pifer, and Professor Tracy, who is working 
up variety descriptions of vegetables. In our 
work in agrostology we are trying to And or 
grow and improve Legumes and Graminosae 
suited for forage and soiling purposes here in 
the Sacramento Valley. With vegetables, our 
work will lie to get complete descriptions aside 
from variety tests. We will be growing this 
year about five hundred species of forage 
plants and about that many varieties of vege- 
tables, so there'll be ''something doing" when 
it gets to be about VHP in the shade. 

The station or farm here consists of about 
eighty acres, on a small creek about three, 
miles from town. 

We stay in Chico, a nice little town of about 
eight thousand inhabitants, so I think I will 
be able to stand it here for a while. 



Interested labor never watches the clock. 

Carl Wheeler, senior in '05, and Carrie Carls, 
freshman last year, were married Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 16, ut the home of the bride's parents near 
Morgiinviiie. Tney will make their boms on a 
farm near Bridgeport. The Herald extends 
congratulations. 



• <•• i- 



m 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



243 



---.*-------'-»-»--->- 



College Campus Restaurant 



Oysters 25 cents. 

Chilli 15 cents. 

Beef Soup ] 5 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY. SHORT ORDER3, ETC. 



CARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 

oooo ooooooo o oo oo o ooooo o o o o ooo o oo o o o 



NEW AND 2«T 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



PECTACLES 



R. E. LOFINCK t 1 cq^^I 



DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



PROFEH8IONAL. 
1>H. G. A. CKI*E, DENTIST. 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
hi vr nest skill and perfection. 



JMl, J. E. TAYLOLI, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



Res. Phone, Colt :«8 Res. Phone. Cave 140 

I >rs. Colt & Cave. 



Office in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



Office Phone 307 



Office phone 41 1 Bouse phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McCormick, Dentist 

Room lfl. Union National Bank Building 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 
It will do you good 



Rock Island 
1 System- 



v 



BEN HUR 
Topeka, Feb. 1, 2, & 3; 



Special train Saturday night if 
t r «iac sufficient number should go. Speak 
KOUfld I Dp, $/.IK> to the agent in plenty of time. 

S. N. Hisinbotham 

deaSr in 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Phone 55 Phone 55 

STUDENTS 

Get your WOOD of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Beat quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

PMONF R MANHATTAN, KAN. 



xoa M. THIDO »T. 



VARNEY'S - BOOKSTORE 

College Text-Books and College Supplies 



i 



We carry the famous 

Keuffel & Esser Drawing Materials, 
Waterman's Meal Fountain Pens. 
Varney Fountain Pens only $1, 
Henry Sears & Co, Warrented Knives. 
K. S. A. C. Writing Tablets and Envelopes. 
College Souvenir Postal-cards. 

Varney's Bookstore, 



We carry 

Co-ordinate paper, 
Single-leaf Note-books, 
H wings' India Ink, 
"Koh-I-noor Drawing Pencils. 
Eye Shades. 
Lamp Shades, etc., etc. 



311 Poyntz Ave. 



244 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



f ' 



i l 






i 



The Place to Buy Your College Supplies is at the 



STUDENTS' 

CO-OPERATIVE 

BOOKSTORE 



We are the acknowledged headquarters for 
all College Supplies. 



Drawing sets. Paper, Inks, Rules. Stationery, etc. 
etc. If we haven't what you want we can net it for 
you; special orders receive prompt attention. 



Also have WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN 

(W OOO OO OO OOOOO OOOOOOO OOOO O O OOO OOOO O OOOOO OOO O O O OOOO QOO O OO O OOOOQtl 



-it ii 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

from 



The Manhattan Coal G. & P. Co. 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, Hgr. 

Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
INE. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



Special Rates to Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 

BOYLE, Prop. 
EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

41] Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 

ofctJUo GROW 

Elevator on C. R, I. & P. Ry. 

Geo- T, Fielding & Sons. 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 

GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mower*. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

£| ENGEL BROTHERS 






Manhattan 



Transfer 



Line 



Electric-Lighted & Heated Buses & Hacks 
Day and Night Baggage Line 



Meet all trains day or nijrbt, LARGE 
WAGONETTS and PARK PHAE- 
TONS suitable for class parties etc. 
Let us caU your attention to our up-to- 
date livery line. Bikes a specialty. 



H. J. Barnhouse L. W. Phillips 



I 



I 



L L 



>* 



"THE OLD RELIABLE" 

.Manhattan Candy Kitchen. 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



*±. 



Phone 1 67 



All Kinds of 




Ice C 



ream 



Oysters 



TT 



Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



-n 



W "^ • 



l hmri* Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 

r ouniain. ice cream sodas — — 



l 



i 

i 



-j 



>• 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



fl 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. (| If so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
t| Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest, tj Buy 
your separator NO W , and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

CHICAGO 

Randolph and Canal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
1113 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

and ll Drouim Street, 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlundt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Vouville Square 

TORONTO 

and 77 Yurk Street 

WINNIPEG 

248 McDermet Avenue 



Ihd . 



imm 




r 



IWI 



%he Students' Herald 



I 

I 



Published by the Students 
of the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College X. X. 






I 



,-i 



I 




THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



245 



^^= 



SENIORS 



The winter term 
is the best time to 
have your photo** 
graphs made. You 
feel better, so do we. 



Wolfs Studio 



Schultz Bros. Meat Market. 



MEAT, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

PHONE 33 

F, B. ELLIOTT 

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AGENCY 
HOUSES SOLD ON EASY PAYMENTS 



21*.) Po.yntz Ave., 



Manhattan, Kan. 



The Elk Barber Shop 

and Bath Rooms 

Six baths far one dollar. Fine line of cigars and toilet 
articles. Razors honed. 

BARNEY YOUNOCAMP, Prop. 



Best Soda Water 



AT 



Corner Drug Store 

DOUGHERTY BROS 

THE BARBERS 

On Third Street. In Union Na- 
tional Bonk Building. . . 

Porcelain bath tubs, «ne line cigars and toilet articles 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY 

AND RAILROAD ACCOUNTING 

$50 to $100 pet* month salar.v assured our 
graduates under bond. You don't pay us 
until you have a position. Largest system 
of telegraph schools in America. En- 
dorsed by all railway officials. Opera- 
tors always in delimit* I. Ladies also 
admitted. Write for catalogue. 

MORSE SCHOOL OF TELEGRAPHY 

Cincinnati, O., Buffalo, N. Y., Atlanta, 
Ga., La Crosse, Wis., Texarkana, Tex., 
San Francisco, Cat. 



THE MANHATTAN 

BARBER SHOP and BATH ROOMS 

RAZORS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

SIX BATHS $1.00 

302 Poyntz P. G HOSTRUP, Prop. 



FOR FINE WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERY 

Manhattan Steam Laundry 

Special Prices to Students Wait for 
the Wagons. - - Phone 157 



BOYS! 



FOR 

Oysters 



GO TO 



IKE HOLBERT'S 



L.W.TURNER 

Livery, Feed and 
Boarding Stable. 



113 Poyntz Ave., 



Phone 53. 



GO TO 

H. L. HULL & SON 

To buy all kinds of 

Hardware, Cutlery, Etc. 



Guaranteed Cutlery 

RAZORS, KNIVES, SCISSORS, We 
offer you only the best. Ai X> 

W, M, STINGLEY & CO. 



216 



THE STUDENTS 1 HERALD. 



JT WILL PAY YOU TO TRADR WITH ^= 




Dry "Goods Room. 

Misses' Rtbbed Union Suits, 
all sizes, 50c value for me 

Misses' Ribbed Union Suits, 
sizes, 5. 7. H, Ko value for 11H* 

One lot of Ladies' FJght 
Weight Fleeced i'unts. sizes. 
1 and 5. per pair Itte 

20 per cent off on all other lines 
of Ladies" and Children's Under- 
wear - A dollar's worth for BOe. 

Royal Worcester Corsets with 
hose supporters. BO cents and If. 

Ready -to- Wear Room. 

Special sale on Ladles' suits. 

*25 suits for tW.50 

112.W *;..*» 

Big bargains in Winter Cloaks. 
McCall Patterns. 10 cents and 
15 cents, none higher. 



Shoe Room. 

TEN per cent OFF on all our 
Shoes this month. 

Krlpiiendorf-Ditfmann Co.'s 
ladies' shoes are the best you 
can buy. 

Gymnasium Slippers. 



Hardware Room. 

Keen Kutter goods. Pocket- 
knives, Razors, Shears. Scissors, 
Saws, Axes, Edge tools. Stoves 
and Ranges, Wilson Improved 
Air-tight Heaters. We will save 
you money on Guns and loaded 
Shells. 



Grocery Room. 

I5c-cnn Succotash 10 

l5c-can Meets ,..IOc 

ISc-eun Pumpkin toe 

I3c-Ciin Lima Reims 5c 

25c-cun Peaches stp 

Kic-hottle Oyster Cocktuil 
Sauce 80c 

Set Oiu>s and Saucers £5e 

VcgelHhlc Dishes.. 5«* 

Class Sauce Dishes. 5c 

Onmges. Lemons. Bananas, Ap- 
ples, etc. Murdock's Hecla, 
Club ii nd Nectar Coffee In pound 
packages and bulk, O. P. I. 
Extracts. Your money hack if 
not satisfied. 



We deliver goods promptly to any part of the city. Ladies' waiting, writing and toilet rooms tip stairs 

Phone H8 for Groceries, Flour, Grain, Feed, Coal, Wood, etc. 

Phone 87 for Dry-Goods, Iteady-to-wear Goods, SIiocm, Hardware. 



SPALDING'S 




Official 

Athletic 

Almanac 



FOR 1906 



Edited by JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

Price 10 cents 



Send your name and address 
to our nearest store for 
Spalding's Catalogue of all 
Athletic Sports-it's free. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Washington 
Boston 
Kansas City 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Chicago 
New Orleans 
Minneapolis 
Cincinnati 
Denver 
Montreal, Can. 



St. Louis 
San Francisco 
Baltimore 
Philadelphia 

Pittsburg 
London. Eng. 



Special Rates to Students. 



Work Called For and 
Promptly Delivered 



Model Laundry 

BOYLE, Prop. 

EARL THURSTON, College Agent. 

411 Poyntz Avenue. Phone 74 



fi is- 



A Matter of Economy 



to buy your 

Feed, Seeds & Fuel 

ftom - 



The Manhattan Coal G.& P. Co 

Phone 67. H. H. Bates, flgr. 




Published 
Each Thursday By 
Jhe Students Or The 
Kansas State Agricultural College 

Motto.'LietEve^yQne cultivate His Omn Genius. 



Volume XI. 



Manhattan, Kan., February 1, 1906. 



Number 19 



THE WINNING ORATION. 

Divine Direction in History. 

Uncertainty is the necessary concomitant of 
hum&n enterprise: hope its inspiring angel. 
While onward roll the centuries, while count- 
less .ages return vast tombs and guilded 
monuments to Mother-dust, man's future is 
ever wrapped in a veil of pierceless obscurity. 
Though bold his schemes, though mighty his 
projects, he can never know what will be their 
outcome. And though he rise to heights 
sublime, though he seemingly conquer nature 
and all her forces, yet. he is powerless to fore- 
cast the future. Where to-day, are the invin- 
cible legions of Napoleon and the subjugated 
land of the Slav'? Where is the kingdom of 
that Alexander who sheathed his bloody sword 
and sighed for more worlds to conquer? 
Where is the mighty Roman Km pi re to which 
the whole world, both civilized and barbarous, 
did homage? Is it possible that these highly 
perfected conditions of human enterprise have 
met with utter dissolution? Search the pages 
of history, ambitious man, and behold the 
accomplished purposes or the Almighty. There 
is a God in history. Record declares it, 
reason asserts it, necessity proves it. Man's 
inability to control and powerlessness to 
foresee future conditions, speaks with eloquence 
of God's purposes as accomplished in the 
councils of eternity. 

The controlling hand of destiny is mani- 
fested in the history of the race as it has 
wended its weary way from the fens of bar- 
barism with its tyranny, its vice and supersti- 
tion, to the Olympian abode of modern civiliza- 
tion with ita prowess, its mastery, its char- 
acter and manhood. The cradle of this civili- 
zation has rocked for centuries. From its 
fostering embrace has come forth lord and 



potentate, king and subject, 
priest and prophet, poet and 
philosopher. Grappling with 
the physical, the intellectual and the moral 
problems which confronted them, directed by 
the finger of God's omnipotence, they dared 
and conquered. As relentlessly as the storm- 
tossed billows beat the rocky cliffs on Good 
Hope's rugged coast, even so has the sturdy 
surge of man's unpremeditated march assailed 
the hidden wastes before it. Venturing not to 
meet the sun in his on-coming, but choosing 
rather to follow as he sped to greet the eve- 
ning Hesperus, man turned his footsteps on a 
westward mission. Gaining in courage as the 
dangers multiplied, he hesitated not to pierce 
the shadowy veil of the sullen German forest, 
nor to scale the dizzy heights of Italy's grim 
protector, the towering Alps. No, not even 
the trackless sea whose waters boiled in seeth- 
ing spray, a terror to the superstitious mind, 
not even this could stay the onward march of 
human enterprise and civilization. It dared 
and conquered : and the western world felt the 
tread of that majestic march. Ever as it sped 
onward, it grew in grandeur and when the clos- 
ing years of the nineteenth century saw the 
globe at last girdled and the western civiliza- 
tion standing at the threshold of its birth, it 
stood aghast and wondered. What was the 
story of the ages? Man's steady development, 
a gradual ascent toward, the divine consent, a 
God in history. 

What, then, is the measure of this advance- 
ment? Lo, when westward the course of power 
and empire had fought its way, until at last it 
viewed again the threshold of its birth, China, 
like a worthless child, was found still sleeping. 
Inert and dormant as a rock in the raging sea, 
the assailing billows of innate ambition had 
failed to arouse her. Content with the tradi- 



248 



.THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



tions and attainments of hep forefathers, she 
had slumbered on through th? BWdep of centu- 
ries, until her accumulated filth and threaten- 
ing putrefaction had aroused the vultures of 
Europe and the West. The wide diversity be- 
tween her social, intellectual and moral con- 
dition and that of western civilization is a 
measure of man's advancement, the proof of 
divine direction. And when through China 
the divine purpose has been served, unless she 
break down her splendid walls of isolation 
and greet the higher civilization now at her 
threshold, as % nation she shall perish. The 
inexorable logic of history predicts her doom. 
But upon what grounds do we make this 
declaration? It is because history is destined 
to a certain end. ordained to fulfill a certain 
purpose. It is in conformity with the eternal 
law of ages that right must finally triumph 
and that the worthless must be subverted. 
Who, as he scans with careful eye the vicissi- 
tudes attending that mighty trend of civilization 
to the West, until, after a lapse of centuries it. 
has encircled the glohe, made rich the deserts, 
founded the nations of earth, crushed the 
worthless, ma/nifi-d the exhalted and at last 
consummated a civil ization filled with unex- 
p acted wonders— who in all this does not see a 
destiny diivcted by the Supreme Hand, leading 
men and nations to a higher plane? 

The Ruler of national destiny is full of 
resource. He not only instills the moral 
incentive that He may accomplish His pur- 
pose, but He even tries the nations with 
dissolution and bloodshed to this end. 
Picture in vour mind the evolution of the race 
as in actual life. It has written its history 
upon the eternal page of God's dominions. 
What vicissitudes, what deadly strifes, what 
raging wars, what vile intrtgu as, what unholy 
combinations! Are these also according to 
the divine purpose? Tis even so. Various 
are the resources of the Almighty and 
mysterious are His ways. The negative re- 
action of evil is no less a potent factor in the 
growth of man than is the positive inspiration 
of moral character. The appreciation of right 
is emphasize I by knowledge of sin and its 
penalties. Who ever felt the mellow glory of 
the sunlight, until the fiery orb. having hid his 
face for many days, burst forth anew from 
behind the gathered clouds and kissed again 
the hill-tops? What prisoner ever knew the 
sublime grandeur manifest in nature's realm 
until he paced the stony floors and viewed the 
bands of silent steel about his dungeon? 
What nation, then, had known the wealth of 
justice, peace and liberty, had it not been 
chafed with galling bonds of superstition, 



arrogance and vice ? God rules the nations ; 
and His purpose is accomplished by instilling 
into the hearts of men that undying love of 
liberty which is the fear and dread of despotic 
governments. Moreover, every evil cradles 
its own overthrow. "Truth crushed to earth 
shall rise again. The eternal years of God 
are hers." That king, who fosters at his 
throne the unjust oppression of his snbjects, 
ignites a giant stick, whose rumble of destruc- 
tion shall only die away in the harsh mutter- 
ings of a revolution. Thus the destined end is 
being accomplished even in the throes of vice 
and dissolution by which the nations of to-day 
shall awaken to a more glorious future on the 
morrow. 

Mount you, then, th? highest pinnacles of 
modern civilization; cast your eyes down the 
open scroll of history, back through the weary 
ages, mark the footsteps of mankind, and de- 
clare if you can that they have not been di- 
rected by an all-powerful course of destiny: 
that God is not manifest in history : that He is 
not a God of battles. Who was He who 
inspired the patriot's heart and forged his 
nerves with steel and bade him brave the ter- 
rors of Thermopylae? Who, in the matchless 
foresight of his wisdom, smote besotted Rome, 
drunk with the glory of her conquests, and sat 
above the clouds on unmoved Gibralter direct- 
ing the destiny of nations ; while the dark ages 
enveloped Europe in chaotic gloom: while the 
masses were surging in listless confusion; 
while new principles, new theories and a new 
social order were forming: while the very 
earth trembled in the throes of the Revolution? 
Who was He who changed the course of his- 
tory, when forth He called the staunch apostle 
of the North and steeled his lips to declare the 
corruption of the Roman Papacy? Who bade 
him assail the entire world, defy the Diet of 
Worms and face his persecutors with a counte- 
nance not altogether human?. Join the re- 
sponse, thou Christian world who bow, not to 
a man-created God, but to Immanuel alone. 

Think you not that history has a destiny 
which no man can foresee? How many have 
been the conflicts waged whose termination in- 
volved a condition of which no man dreamed! 
The earth trembled with the shock when the 
Maine sank in Havana's harbor. A war was 
on for the sake of humanity. Scarcely had the 
reverberations of that deadly mine died in the 
distance, when Dewey's cannon responded to 
the echo thousands of miles away. Swift as 
the zigzag lightning cuts the heavens and as 
unforeseen in its coming, the United States had 
cast aside her garments of "splendid isola- 
tion" and had donned the insignia of the lead- 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



249 



ing powers of the world. Her policy was 
changed, and she stood forth the fear and 
wonder of the world. 

* 

The silent battle of the world is in progress 
and the finger of God is pointing the way to 
the destined goal. The day of individual eon- 
test has passed: that of national will soon be 
over. Then will come that last great struggle 
when nations linked to nations shall be drawn 
into two mighty contending forces, when there 
shall be enacted upon the stage of international 
politics that last sublime drama of the ages, 
that of race predominance. What the outcome 
will be the present perceives from the past: the 
future lifts not the biding veil: but the great 
God of destiny lifts his fostering hand above 
his chosen people, and in this omen we see the 
Anglo-Saxon forever triumphant. 

Let the great God of history direct the 
nations of His dominions. Let Hira arm the 
strong and upright to fight the battles of His 
people. Let Him inspire the Muse of history 
to write on her open page the story of a kingly 
race, whose wealth shall gild the sunlight. 

C. E. Davis. 



Davis Won for the Hamilton*. 

The sixth annual inter-society oratorical 
contest, which took plae.3 last Saturday eve- 
ning in the College auditorium, resulted, as 
did the contest of last year, in a victory for the 
Hamilton society. Mr. C. E. Davis, with an 
oration entitled, "Divine Direction in His- 
tory,'' was the man who brought honor to 
himself and his society by securing first place. 
Not until the decision of the judges was 
announced was it certain who would win, and 
this fact only increased the enthusiasm of the 
happy Hamps. when the result was known. 

The attendance was fully as great as was 
that of last year, and many of the spectators 
were from out of town. Society colors were 
freely displayed, both by society members and 
their friends, but there was very little attempt 
at decorating the Auditorium. The Webster 
section was decorated with the green of their 
own society and the brown and gold of their 
sister society, theEurodelphian. Enthusiasm— 
the noisy kind—was much in evidence, both 
before and after the contest, and while there 
was enough to satisfy an ordinary person, it 
seemed that the volume was not as great as has 
been heard in previous years. 

The Alpha Beta's had first place on the pro- 
gram, and their music was furnished by the 
Alpha Beta chorus of fifteen members. Their 
song, "The Masqueraders," was certainly 
original and entertaining. They were followed 
by their orator, R. R. Birch, whose subject 



was. "America's Mission to the Nations." 
Mr, Birch ranked first in thought and compo- 
sition, hut did not do so well in delivery. His 
oration was well given, however, and was 
heard throughout the building. 

The Websters came next, and their music 
was furnished by the Mandolin Club, Then M. 
R. Shuler spoke on "Our Country's Mission." 
Mr. Shuler ranked next to the winner in 
thought and composition, but like Mr. Birch 
his grade was lowered because of his delivery. 
Mrs. Moore, wife of H. E. Moore, '91, 
furnished the Franklin music. She sang 
"L' Estase" and responded to an encore. E. 
M. Wilson followed with an oration on 
"Younger America." Mr. Wilson's voice 
was poor and it was with difficulty that he 
could be heard. 

The Hamilton music was furnished by the 
Hamilton quartet, which sang "The Voices of 
Freedom." Mr. Davis then came forward and 
began his oration. It was at once evident that 
his delivery was better than any of those who 
had preceded him. His words were slowly 
and distinctly spoken and could easily be 
heard throughout the Auditorium. 

The last music— "Old Folks at Home"— was 
furnished by the Ionian quartet. Then the last 
speaker of the evening, Miss Marcia Turner, 
delivered her oration, "Paths of Peace." Miss 
Turner's delivery was excellent and her ora- 
tion was much enjoyed by the audience. The 
attention given her was probably better than 
that accorded any of the other spsakers and it 
was said by many that in delivery she would 
rank first. 

While the judges were making their decision, 
the customary vocal exercises were indulged in. 
Each society, in the opinion of its members, was 
most successful in producing noise, but to a 
person in the gallery it was one long, unbroken 
period of tumult and discord. When Professor 
McKeever came forward to announce the result, 
quiet was for a moment restored and then the 
"Role-Bole-O" of the victorious Hamps. broke 
forth and continued till almost midnight. 

OFFICIAL SCORE. 



Thot. & ('oral). Delivery 



Contestants. 



Fin ul. 



* \9 

c 8 
c 

ft 



■— 
z 

3 

ft I im 

1 £ 
m 
ft 



'«. 



Birch ,90 98 92.0 

Shuler 94188 85.5 

Wilson 86" 



Isc'hI g 

a 

I 



ft 1 III 

" 3 
5 



!» 

89,', 



Davis 96 

Turner ..., ! KB 



9.") 85.0 88' 
90 KS.o.rt)* 
HOHO.OIW)* 



88 93 

85 8^ 

4 8487 

»|85994- 

9899 



■ < M 



> 

ft 

3 

ft 



85 

81 

78! 

93+ 

90S 



> 
ft 
3 






3K9A 

4!85V a 

583J 

l»ll+ 

2J8W 



"Set your shoulders joyously to the world's 
wheel."— Hiivehck Ellis. 



250 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



Things Seen and Heard. 

The Hamps. using a bass drum to aid thorn 
in making discord. 

The Eurodelphians sitting in part of the 
Webster section. 

The Io's nre out on the side lines. 
The Hamps huve fumbled the hull. 
The A. H's. are suhbinir the Franklins, 
Hut Stonier will wade through them all. 

Each Ionian carrying a lyre. 

Miss Turner receiving a handsome bouquet 
as a gift from the Io's. 

Somebody cough. 

Some Franklins dressed in their dairy suits. 

Ionian ! Ionian : hip. hip. hurrnh : 
Turner, Turner, Turner our way. 

Tommy White blowing a tin whistle. 



Y. W. Bible Study Nates. 

Between eighty and ninety are enrolled in 
classes for the year. No special class is ar- 
ranged for short-course girls, hut they enroll 
in the regular classes. 

Classes meet at 7:00 p. m. on week nights, at 
different rooms. 

Teachers of the classes are: Mrs. Bell, Mrs. 
Wilson, Miss Jennie E. Thayer, Miss Ella 
Weeks, Miss Clara Alexander, Miss Margaret 
Minis, and Miss Caroline Hopps. 

Mrs. Wilson's class is taking up a general 
course of study. The other classes use .differ- 
ent outlines of study in either the Old or New 
Testament. 

Grinding out the Herald. 

As I turned the latch, the atmosphere, that 
during the night had developed from a gentle, 
western zephyr into something a great deal 
more strenuous, swung the door back in my 
face with a jolt that caused me to utter words 
which J shall not repeat. After a brief strug- 
gle, I succeeded in putting the offender under 
lock and, pocketing the key, buttoned my 
storm-coat about me and started up the hill. 

How un ins pi ring the elements were. The 
wind sighed and moaned through the trees 
and among the buildings as though most of 
humanity were dead and it the chief mourner. 
The pale, sickly gleams of light that came 
through the various windows reminded one of 
the sick-room, giving him the impression that 
the wind had just cause for its action. 

The streets were deserted, save for one per- 
son about half a block ahead of me. Thinking 
that the figure and walk were familiar. I quick- 
ened my pace and soon overtook him. I was 
not mistaken. It was the editor, and he looked 
as cheerful as a toad .that has been plowed out 
early in the spring before having finished his 



winter nap, and spoke as one whose breakfast 
had been a mi ruts quantity. We proceeded on 
our way in silence. 1 wondering what readily 
procurable eatable would lighten his spirits the 
most, and he thinking T dared not ask what. 

Early though it was wh( j n we entered the 
office, we found our energetic local editor sit- 
ting at his desk, busily chewing his pencil, 
lie growled "(load Morning*' at us in a way 
that implied ''Don't be fools enough to disturb 
me with an answer." After kicking the un- 
offending waste-basket under the table and test- 
ing the durability of several of the office chairs, 
the editor jerked ofT his coat, unlocked his 
storeroom, and extracted therefrom a jar of 
paste. Thinking that the paste, jar and all, 
was intended for me. [ stepped behind the door, 
took oil" my coat and hat, and then took a sur- 
vey of the field of action through a crack. 
Finding that the supposed enemy had confined 
his attack to the locals, I put on a stern husi- 
ness-like expression and went to work, with 
one eye on the man across the table, 

When the editor had finished with the locals, 
he took from his hook a jumbled mass of 
papers and flung them on the table, just as the 
fat reporter ambled into office with his ever- 
ready smile that has made him so popular with 
the fair members of his class. But the sunshine 
of this smile was appalled and darkened by the 
black, worried looks of the rest of the staff 
seated around the table. 

We all watched the editor as he looked over 
the papers taken from his hook. One appeared 
entirely blank, cme had something written on 
every third line, another was a mass of criss- 
cross markings, and another had the appear- 
ance of a paper covered with an endless hair- 
spring twisted in e\^vy conceivable direction. 

The editor wrestled with these an hour, and 
then called on the rest of the staff for help. On 
seeing the sheets of criss-cross marks, the liter- 
ary editor asked if we had any children on the 
staff. On being informed in the negative, we 
all went to work, looking at the papers from 
every side, thinking and wondering. Finally 
the fat reporter jumped to his feet and shouted. 
''I have it! These are the societies' reports." 
And so they were. After thinking the mutter 
over, the editor sent me for a microscope and 
the local editor for a hierog]y|ihist. After 
staining the blank sheet of paper and using the 
microscope at high power, wv found that it was 
the report of the Agricultural Association. 

The hieroglyphist was abb to mik 1 out the 

"lo." and "Bamp." reports. All of us put 

together succeeded in supplying what the A. 

B. reporter imagined between the lines. 

Next we all lined up and started in to make 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



251 



a touch-down on the "Frank." report, but it 
was no use. The line formations were invinci- 
ble, and as we could not make an end run with- 
out getting off the paper, we dropped back for 
a place kirk, and tin* editor hooted the Using , 
into the waste-basket. 

We had just got settled again when our busi- 
ness manager blundered in on us with the ex- 
pression of one who had fought aud lost. If I 
am correct, he had lost. For. as he stated, be 
had been down town trying to collect a lot of 
back hills that his predecessor failed to lind use 
for, and about all lv received was a lot of 
abuse that was not due. 

We were all thinking and talking over the 
business manager's troubles when a gentle step 
was beard at the door and a feminine voice in- 
quired for the editor. We were all on our feet 
in an instant, the editor bowing and smiling 
his b\st. "Mr. Editor," came in icy tones, "f 
requested you to stop my paper two months 
ago.' 1 The editor Immediately put the table 
between himself and the fair intruder. "I— I— 
for got all about it, Madam," exclaimed our 
chief. "Well, will you stop it new?" she 
asked. '"Why, certainly," he responded: and 
taking up the mailing hook, with trembling 
kne;>s and shaking hands, he struck her name 

from the list. 

We again went to work, and as each finished 
be leaned back in his chair with a sigh of relief 

and solemnly watched the rest. At live minutes 
of twelve the editor threw down his pen and 
rose to his feet with a smile of satisfaction. 
Then we all grinned, for another issue of the 
Stit hunts' H Kit AM) was ready for the printer. 

Sol. W. Cunningham. 



in«r difficult throws, but Ferris could always be 
depended upon. C'aine wrenched his knee dur- 
ing the second half and was forced to take out 
time, but he continued to play and did good 
work. Blake and Topping made some im- 
provement in guarding, but they seemed to 
lack accuracy in throwing the ball. 

Major General Rightley, of St. John's, was 
one of tbi officials, and his uniform and mili- 
tary bearing attracted much attention and fur- 
nished a good deal of amusement for the crowd. 
At one time he called three fouls on our boys 
because some one in the audience had the au- 
dacity to speak above a whisper. 

Field Field 

St. John's. Goals. K. S. A. C. Gauls 

Palmer 2 R. F 

Noel H L. F 

Persian 3 C. 

Miller K. (J. 

Gray (5 L. G. 

Gnals from free throw: Noel I. Gray 1, Ferris 8 

St. John's li). tC. S. A. C. HI. 



K. S. A. C. 

Ferris 7 

(,'uit 5 

('iiine 3 

Topping <* 

B!ake 

Fotds: 



K. A. C. 34, St. John's 28. 

The second hasket-ball game of the season 
occurred 1 a *t Thursday evening, when the Col- 
lide boys beat the team from St. John's Mili- 
tary Academy. The game was not as well at- 
tended as was the preceding one, but it was 
more closely contested and was more interest- 
ing for the spectators. The teams were evenly 
matched, first one side being ahead and then 
the other. The visitors had the advantage in 
team work, but our boys excelled in individual 
work. Both sides were weak on free throws, 
St. John's throwing but two goals out of six- 
teen trials, while the College threw only three 

ont of nineteen. 

Gray was the player who did the best work 
for the "rookies." He threw the most goals 
and helped, to a great extent, in keeping our 
score down. Persian at center also did well. 
Noel and Palmer each threw two goals. 

Carr and Ferris were the stars for the Col- 
lege. Carr was especially successful in inak- 



Still Alive, 

Beaten, hut not conquered I That spells Al- 
pha Beta! Saturday night, while the Ilamps. 
were holding their pow-wow around a little 
blaze on the corner of Moro and Manhattan, 
the pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Ridenour, 
just west, was turned into a "hospital" for the 
defeated Alpha Betas. 

The genial warmth and cheery brightness of 
the "hospital," the kind hospitality of the pro- 
prietors, and the dainty refreshments that were 
soon brought in, had a wonderful effect, and 
no one present expressed a single regret that 
he wasn't a Hamp. 

After the repast Beeman "took the chair" 
and several jolly toasts were given. W. W. 
Smith toasted our contestant; M._G. Smith 
talked of the society in general, while Miss 
Finley, Pat Ireland, and Dan Sullivan, toasted 
the A. R. girls, the A. B. hoys, and the A. B. 
alumni, respectively, and T. F. White talked 
of the other societies. 

We adjourned at a late hour. 

Eurodetphian Society. 

At the meeting of the Euros', Saturday, Miss 
Fjtta Carol ton was initiated, after which the 
following program was rendered : Vocal solo. 
by Beryl Rickman: select reading, by, Zola 
Walton. We then listened to an interesting 
novelty number, by Tillic Harold, assisted by 
Hall ie Smith and Rev a Cree. The violin solo, 
by Miss Lane, was much appreciated. The ex- 
temporaneous speaking was interesting. Tillie 
Harold and El sie Brown then favored us with 
a piano duet. Katherine Cooper gave a select 
reading, and FJlen Berkey an original poem. 
A piano duet by Hallie Smith and Tillie 
Harold closed the program. E. M. 



252 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




One CuirrvAte Hr» 
Own Gcniuj. .4.. 

Printed tn College I'rimintf Depart- 
ment by student labor. 



Entered at the post-office at Manhattan. Kan., as second- 
class matter. 



Subscription rates: One dollar a year, in advance. 
Single copies, live cents. 



F. A. Kiknr. Jit., 00 Editor-in-chief 

(4HOVKK Kahl.'d. Hitsiness Manager 

B.0 Fahkak. "or Literary Editor 

L. R. Gaston. '08 j MVa[ Editor 

S. W. Cunningham. '08 Kxchan^e Editor 

O. B. Whipple. W Assoc. Business >fame*er 

J. S. MuNTf.nMKitv. "07 S li 1 »serip Li on Manager 

OltAeK HAWKINS. 'OH I . _ 

A. G. PHILLIPS, W f Assoc. Local Editors 

Elizabeth Swkkt. '04 Alumni Editor 

Jas. R. Cox kn. W , Reporter 



All orders for subscriptions and Inquiries concerning 
advertising space should be addressed to the business 
managers. 

To insure insertion, matter intended for publication 
should be nun if on the editor-in-chief's hook not later 
than Monday noon of each week. 



A red mark aeross this item means that your subscrip- 
tion is due and that you are most respectfully requested 
to forward the amount to the business manager. 

Elizabeth Sweet. "04, ahirrmi editor, will he jflad to re- 
ceive any information concerning alumni. 



MANHATTAN, KAN., Feu. 1, lfKW. 




tf> v 



mr on 




The musical numbers given last Saturday 
evening by the societies introducing the ora- 
tions were most pleasant and gratifying. We 
consider it a little foretaste of the good things 
that are coming on iMarch 8. 

Well! The "rough-necks" were much in 
evidence last Saturday evening, in spite of the 
fact that tickets were issued for the contest. 
The whistling, shouting and stamping which 
came from the wings of the gallery was most 
disgraceful, "coming as it did from College 
boys. Many of our estimable underclassmen 
have a long way to climb before reaching the 
level of respectability. It b the policy of 
many when in a crowd to cast off all restraint, 
feeling that nothing derogatory will be ac- 
credited the individual. But rowdyism leaves 
its mark on the face of the parson who in- 
dulges in it. It costs a little self- respect, a 
little of the respect of others, and a little of 
refinement. Be careful what you do and say, 
students. 



The present arrangement of chapel seating 
will do much to make the morning exercises 
pleasant and interesting. A good rule for 
each individual to follow in any audience is 
that of leaving no seat vacant in front when 
choosing a chair. Every one, bring your 
classmates and friends to chapel and occupy 
front seats. Use the new song books. 

The sixth annual oratorical contest has 
passed into history. The battle has been lost 
and won. Of those coming under our observ- 
ance, Ibis has been the best of all. But here is 
not the stopping place. At least three mem- 
bers of each society should immediate!; resolve 
to win next year's contest or make a fellow 
society member win it. The contest is good 
for all societies, a ul for the winning society 
should .serve 1 to carry it at the pinnacle, to the 
occurrence ct the next. 



tlamps. 

Excuse me if I seem to soliloquist for a mo- 
ment about the big doings Saturday night. Of 
course, this may not he necessary, as most of 
you folks were there, but for the benefit of those 
of you who went off borne and beat \ our heads 
this is intended. Before the first spasm of joy 
had passed, the kindling wood began to suffer. 
When the boxes began to get scarce we made a 
charge on the pie and we didn't do a tiling to 
that department. Hy the way, among those 
after-dinner speeches were several whieh 
smacked of oratory. However, we soon dis- 
covered that the pie was "all in," so we all 
went to the "hay" singing, "Bye, A. B., bye 
oh," etc. J. h. a 

Odds and Ends. 

The University of Nebraska has at last 
broken into the '"Big Five" debating league, 
consisting of Minnesota, Wisconsin. North- 
western, Chicago and Michigan. Word was 
recewed by the debating board last week to 
the effect that the University of Wisconsin had 
decided to meet them in debate. 

Dr. F. H. Snow, of the University of Kan- 
sas, has made twenty-four scientific col lectin & 
expeditions in the past thirty years. His firs"t 
collection, resulting from an expedition in 
1870, was brought with much danger from the 
Indians. Eight expeditions have been made to 
Colorado, six to New Mexico, four to western 
Kansas, four to Arizona, and two to Texas. 
Over 175,000 specimens have been taken. The 
work of the last season was on the Mexican 
boundary line and resulted in the taking of a 
great many species of insects never before 
taken into the United States, a considerable 
number being new to science.— Ex. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



*253 




254 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 




Tom White is grafting this week. 

Don't forget the military hall February 14. 

Baseball good* 2> stylos glows 11 styles 
pads. Frost & Davis. 

Calling 1 cards written to order. Address or 
eall, 517 North Juliette. 

Assistant Ahcarn is superintending th? en- 
larging of Levers' Lane. 

A number of the "gym" girls practiced out 
on the campus hist Friday. 

Professor Valley sang at the Academy of 
Music in Kansas City last Sunday. 

John HessU gave a lecture n.i ••Italy" at 
the opera -house last Friday evening. 

The Ihysks Department lias received and 
installed a new coincidence pendulum. 

Th* Herald staff received several "eoaipa" 

to the Radium lecture Monday evening. 

Compfcte 10, XJ Hue of Victor and ether base* 

hall goods on exhibit at Frost & Davis. 

Jas, W. Crooks has h >en out of College for 
several days, with an attack of lagrippe. 

Carl Miller has dropped out of College, and 
is now attending school in Fort Collins, Colo. 

A number of junior hoys took privat ■ lessons 
in cutting caper.-) and dancing Monday fore- 
noon. 

Foss Farrar fell on the ice one day last week 
and was out of College for a few duvs as a 
result. 

Captain Shaffer and members of his fencing 
class have some lively "round-ups'" each day 
after drill. 

The engineering classes were dismissed last 
Friday and Saturday on account of Professor 
Fyer's ahsence. 

Co. I, K. N. G. will give a military hall in 
the city auditorium February 14. Bee their 

ad. in this issue. 

The post-office girls are complaining- of being 

lonesome lately. General Secretary McLean 
will return to-day. 

Bowman will "keep off" th-» grass in the 
future. Professor Dickens persuaded him to 
that way of thinking. 

The Fantatorium, with a barber shop, at 
1218 Moro street, is now open and readv for 
business. Call and see us. 

Nora Hays and J. B. Gritting, former 
Franklin orators, were around College last 
week and attended the contest. 



A. A. Potter has received a passing grade 
in spoonology and will take up the study of 
home management in the spring. 

We neglected to state last week that the 
second-hour calculus class ••hummed" and 
had a class of their own, January 19. 

P. II. Jorgensoii returned Monday morning 
and has resumed his work in the dairy short 
course. He was a student here last year. 

Prof. Jl, F. Kyer and wife were called to Hia- 
watha last Friday on ace, unt of the death of 
Mrs. Eyer's sister. They returned Monday 
evening. 

Some degenerate light -fingered bUped walked 
off with the keys .to the gun- racks in the 
Armory a few days ago. New locks will be 
purchased. 

The Hkrald contains more locals than any 
exchange received here. This week's issue has 
the largest number ever published iii a regular 
weekly issue. 

Pres. ar.d Mrs. K. R. Nichols gave an in- 
formal r'C-pUm to the Hoard of K >g >nts and 
the Faculty members at East Parkgate last 
Thursday areata *. 

John Cos] in, an expert on dressed meats, 
will give a demonstration at the College Feb- 
ruary 14 to 17. The Animal Husbandry De- 
partment will furnish the meat. 

A number of alberene stone slabs have b «en 
received by the Ch -mistry Department. They 
will be used as tops for new tables that are lo 
be placed in th • quantitative analysis labora- 
tory 

Milo Ila .stings is putting in his spare time 
working on his thesis. H • was grinding cohs 
and green bores in the Experiment Station 
Monday. Toe subject or his thesis is "Human 
Nutrition." 

Walter Strife and thr; Broom brothers are 
heck in College, after an absence of several 
days. They were quarantined on account of 
diphtheria. Adelaide Strlta and Lizzie and 
Charles Broom were the guilty parties. 

\V. K. Mathewson was elected Assistant 
eh 'mist in the Kxperiment Station at the recent 
meeting of the Hoard of Regents, to Jill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of R. H. 
Shaw. He was also made assistant professor 
of chemistry. 

Mrs. Moore, who furnished the music for the 
Franklins at the contest, is the wife of Harry 
K. Moore. Mil. of Watonga, Okla. She lias 
been on the lecture course platform for one 
season, and is now engaged in evangelical 
singing in Oklahoma. She has sung in Kan- 
sas City and Chicago. 

The National Educational Association will 
hold its annual sessions during the second week 
in July, in San Francisco. This will give a 
splendid opportunity for visiting the west 
slope of the Rockies, as low rat"s are always 
given the teachers. Supt. J. D. Rickman Is 
anticipating getting up a party to take the trip 
together, in case satisfactory arrangements can 
be made as to rates and special accommoda- 
tions Those anticipating the trip might do 
well by corresponding with him.— Jai/hau-ker. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



255 



See the K. N. O. ad. this week? 

Professor K Inzer has a sore throat. 

The seniors are having; their photographs 
taken. 

Doctor Schoenleber is away this week on 
State business. 

Baseball goods 26 styles gloves 11 styles 
pads. Frost & Davis. 

The boys in the dairy class are taking* lessons 
in patching; cement floors. 

Miss Charlotte Morton enjoyed a visit from 
her sister a few days this week. 

Col. J. W. RobhlftOn will give a lecture on 
horses, to the Ag. boys. February 2$. 

Complete 1!M>(» -lino of Victor and Other base- 
hall g-oods on exhibit at Frost & Davis. 

Professor Kin/.er says that the College stock- 
judging contest will be held about March 4. 

Prof. O. Erf is making plans for S new 
pasteurizing- plant at Bing'mgton, New York. 

The Dairy Department has named a Jersey 
calf Sir Gel'vin, in honor of Reverend Gelvin. 

Assistant Eastman and Abeam will have 
charge of Professor Dicken's classes this week. 

Miss Helen Sweet will sing Barnard *a 
'"Plains of Peace" in chapel next Saturday 
morning". 

A, B. Ny strom taught the lirst-hour history 
el ass last Saturday, during the ahsence of 
Professor Price. 

Professor Erf and Assistant Melick will at- 
tend the National Dairy Show at Chicago this 
coming; month. 

Charles Sherman is giving lessons in vocal 
music to a class that he lias organized, ft 
meets down-town. 

C. E. Long. 'OH. received notice last week 
that his father's house, at Neod^sha, was com- 
pletely destroyed by fire. 

The Farm Department is very busy tilling 
out seed orders. The receipts from seed sent 
out January 4- to 7 was $181. 

Chauncey Weaver grew very enthusiastic 
and some say profane when singing the third 
verse of the Hamp. "roast" song. 

R C. Boyle, who gets all bad little boys in 
Riley count v. was elected president of the 
State Sheriff's Literary Society a few days 
ago. 

Brown county students are "crowing" over 
the fact that Brown county corn won about 
everything in sight at the Corn Breeders* Asso- 
ciation. 

Prof, and Mrs. J. T. Willard entertained 
Ex- Senator Edwin Taylor and Dr. C. G. Hop- 
kins of the University of Illinois, one evening 
last week. 

The junior dance in the Commercial Club 
Hall Mondav evening was well attended. Some 
enthusiastic' junior got excited and blew out a 
fuse. After that the crowd danced by the light 
of a parlor match. 



The Farm Department is swamped with cor- 
respondence. Professor Ten Kyek keeps all the 
stenographers he can get hold of busy answer- 
ing Inquiries about seed. 

Professor Dickens says when the new Hort. 
building is finished he will be able to work the 
students harder than ever, with less loss of 
energy to student and instructor. 

General Manager Dean has arranged for a 
basket -ha 11 game with K. V. on March 8. K. 
L T . has probably the best college team in the 
State, and the game should he very interesting. 

Professor Dickens wishes to say that the 
road drag, mentioned in the last issue of this 
paper, was made by the College and not pur- 
chased. They do not buy anything that they 
can make. 

Professor Dickens left last Monday on a 
week's institute trip. He will visit Topeka, 
Kerry ton, Over brook, and Admire. While in 
Topeka he served as a delegate to the semi- 
c en te n n i a 1 convention. 

The basket-hall team went to Fort Riley last 
Monday evening and played the 20th Battery. 
The score was 114 to 1(1 in favor of the Fort. 
Poor condition and the playing (?) of the 
soldiers explains the score. 

Last Monday the Animal Husbandry De- 
partment made a shipment of experiment hogs 
to Wolff's Packing House, in Topeka. A 
slaughter test will be held and observations 
made throughout the work. 

The fiurodelphiuns desire to say that the 
reason they didn't enter the oratorical contest 
this year was on account of the lack of a 
charter. They seen red one two weeks ago and 
will enter the contest next year. 

The poultry department is going to build a 
house <)0x8 feet, just west of Mr. Lewis' house. 
It will be divided into twelve houses and made 
in the most modern style. The idea is to build 
a practical house as cheaply as possible. 

John D, Ziller, of Hiawatha, who won two 
first and one second prize on corn at the Corn 
Breeders* Association, is a practical farmer, 
hut believes in scientific methods in farming. 
He is of Pennsylvania Dutch descent aud has 
farmed in Brown county for eighteen years. 
He farms a 240- acre farm and sells about a 
thousand bushels of seed-corn each year. His 
Yellow Dent corn won the second prize at the 
World's Fair last year. Eleven ears of his 
; corn sold for $14. or' at a rate of about $8o per 
bushel. Mr. Ziller was elected a director of 
the Association. 

Warning : Do not get excited or frightened 
while in ihe Main building this week if it 
should suddenly begin to shake. The win- 
dows may puttie and the lloor tremble. Sounds 
that remind you of a cross between a Kansas 
zephyr, an Ionian yell, and a Coop, Quintet 
song' will rise from' the lower regions. Keep 
calm and as usual attend to your own or some- 
body else's business. It is not an earthquake, 
or a' light, neither is it anybody being "canned." 
It is the Herald reporter and the Local Editor 
getting their just desserts from the people they 

! have "joshed" or "roasted 1 ' lately. Leave 

I them to their fate. 



256 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The Department of Zoology has received a 
numbi't* of animal traps lately from various 
manufacturer s. They were sent here for experi- 
mental purposes. 

Several former students of K. A. ('. who are 
teaching near Manhattan, were in town Satur- 
day to attend the oratorical contest. Among 
them were Misses Jennie Cottrel), '04, and Nora 
Hays, Franklin contestant last year. 

The poultry departra?nt is cooperating with 
the State game warden for the breeding of dif- 
ferent strains of wild birds, particularly pheas- 
ants. Plans are being laid to Luild a large 
house at the College this spring and hey in breed- 
ing pheasants immediately. 

The manner in which the Hkkald staff ap- 
peared in chapel this morning was for adver- 
tising- purposes. The costumes do not repre- 
sent the financial condition of enry member of 
the staff, hut rather the condition the Hkkald 
might be in at some future date if it does not 
receive proper support. 

Few students realize the importance of the 
print-shop of this institution. We give here- 
with a few statements in re yard to it that will 
be of interest. Two years ftgo only student 
labor was employed. At present eight regular 
paid employees are used, besides nine student 
employees. The total expenses of the depart- 
ment during the past few months have aver- 
aged over $1000 per month. Of this over $200 
goes on the student pay-roll. Besides [Hunt- 
ing the bulletins of the Experiment Station 
and three stated College publications, the de- 
partment does a large amount of job work, 



Keep up with the times and subscrilte for the 
Herald. 

'"Professor" Farrar is said to recognize the 
odor of alcohol. 

Miss Ruth Pancost visited relatives and Col- 
lege friends last week. 

The Board of Regents held a meeting' at i 
College last Wednesday. 

The freshmen had a masquerade party in the 
Gymnasium Mondav evening. 

Professor Kammeyer was out of College a 
few days last week on account of sickness. 

Miss Helen Bottomly, '05, who is teaching 
near Cleburne, spent Saturday and Sunday at 
home. 

Misses Wilms and Mary Evans went to 
Topeka Thursday to attend the mid-winter ex- 
position, being held there. 

Professor Kammeyer did not meet his classes 
for a few days last week, on account of that 
prevailing ailment: la grippe. 

Miss Carrie Craemer, of Wamego, came up 
Saturday for a short visit with Misses Kate 
Hutchinson and Dolly CrquharL 

Last Wednesday the I). S. short-course 
class, under the direction of Miss Rose, made 
a tour of the various buildings on the campus. 

Harry Blachly and G. D. Noel came back to 
'"holler" for the Webs, and Hamps., respec- 
tively. Both expect to be back in College at 
some future date. 



such as printing programs, announcements, 
posters, etc, forth a College departments, farm- 
ers* institutes, societies, student organizations, 
etc. The machinery and type that has of late 
been installed has replaced old, worn -out ma- 
terial, and has not materially added to the 
equipment. More type and presses are needed, 
as well as more and better loom. Not includ- 
ing the monthly appropriation ( $66*67), this 
department is self-supporting', 



K. S. A, C. Directory. 



HAMILTON SOCIETY 

President c. I. Weaver 

Vice-president c. E. Davis 

Secretary p. e. Brown 

Meets Silt . nlay evening, lit 7:80 o'clock, in North Soci- 
ety Hull. 

WEBSTER SOCIETY 

President a H. Kirk 

Vice-president W". A. Conner 

Secretary H. H. Con well 

Meets Sum rduy evening, at 7:30 o'clock, in South Soci- 
ety Hull. 

ALPHA 1 J ET A SOC I KT Y 

President , Julia V. Wendel 

v Ice-president e. w. Mather) v 

Secret* ry Jessie Allen 

Meets in South Society Hull. Saturday. 2:00 p. m. 

FRANKLIN SOCIETY 

President Uiehard Recce 

VJce-rresident l. R.Elder 

Secretary oiara schield 

Meets in I<runklin Hull. Snturduy. at 7:30 p. m. 

EURO 1 ) E LP H I A N SOCI ET Y 

President Boline Hanson 

Vice-president. Tiilie Harold 

Secretary Fannie Johnson 

Meets every Saturday in Franklin Hull, at 3:i;> p. m. 

IONIAN SOCIETY 

President , . Liuira L yman 

Vice-president , Odessa Dow 

Secretary Edith Foray the 

Meets in North Society Hall. Saturday, at ±i~> p. m. 

Y. W. C. A. 

President c©*» E. McNutt 

Vice-president Helen lnskeep 

Secretary Klhe i Berry 

Genera Secretary Miss Th . A ?er 

Weekly meeting during noon hour each Saturday in 
South Society Hull, The Home. (SI 7 Manhattan Ave.* 

V. M. 0. A. 

President E. C. Farrar 

Vice-president w . H.Thurston 

Secretary E . L . Shattuck 

General Secretary w . V V. McLean 

Sunday afternoon meetings in Association parlors, at 

ROOTERS' CLUB 
Chairman F A Kiene. Jr 

SS£fiSt nUD ■ A.D.Holloway 

I le.isurer Fred r m,u..v 

Meets at the cull of the chairman. wnosej 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President c, ,, * * _ 

Vice-president ././/// " ' T'g %£$ tt ™ 

Secretary V E W hue 

General Manager Prof 5 a ffi'n 

Meets »t cull of the president. 

ENGINEERS' ASSOCIATION. 

President nwii '*--* 

ViAfk.PraaidAni loije t^urlson 

S«w(i« * R. N. Newland 

?»ecietan j r Ty. yv ., 

Meets Saturday evenings in '(.;«>. .....*.**. iww 

President GmM ' ROOTER S' GhVB. 

SecretaV " •• Stella Campbell 

f^ w ■ Neva Larson 

,je,l(ler Laura Lyman 

Opportunity signer op later comes to all who 
work and wish, hml Maniey. 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



257 



Mrs. H. F. Davis, of Rifcy, viftted College 
last Friday. 

W. W. McLean is expected badk from Okla- 
homa to-day. 

W. S. Davison has lately had '"one of Job's j 
trials'' on his right foot. 

Linn Daughters stayed at home ior a few 
days and entertained the grippe. 

Fred Winters made most of the drawings in 
Professor MeKeever's new book. 

Ross Egy was out of College for a few days 
last week on account of sickness. 

C. E. Bundy, sophomore here last fall, is 
working in a printing-office at Jewell City, 
Kan. 

The literary societies have decided to dis- 
pense with the regular society lecture this 
year. 

Quite a large number of students knew all the 
time just who would win in the contest— "so 
thiy say." 

M. C. Proud, of South Haven, Kan., visited 
College last week. He was a first- year student 
here in '01, 

Did you receive a red-covered Herald last 
week? If so it probably means that we want 
you to "dig up. 

A large number of students are out of College 
these days, suffering with the various ills that 
human flesh is heir to. 

Mr. Jorgenson has been heard to mutter to 
himself several times this week: "Vat a chack- 
ass vat I bin alreaty vas." 

H. E. Hershberger has returned and is in 
College again. "Pa" decided that he was not 
sick enough to stay at home. 

Charles Judd, a former student here, was in 
town for a few hours last week. Hewasonhis 
way to his old home in Irving, Kan. 

The Hort. colt is the only privileged charac- 
ter in K. S. A. C. Professor Dickens does not 
dare to order it to keep off the grass. 

The Webster reporter's write-up of the recep- 
tion of the CoOp. Quintet does them a great 
injustice, and they are more or less "sore" 
about it. 

The revival meetings that were held at the 
Methodist church for three weeks closed Sun- 
day evening. A large number of converts were 
secured. 

Captain Shaffer will address one of the mis- 
sion-study classes at the Y. M. C. A. dormitory 
to-morrow evening on "Conditions in the 
Philippines," as seen by an army officer. 

Assistant Jackson's fourth-hour second-term 
German class is not allowed to speak any Eng- 
lish except in translations. He read them a 
chapter from a German Bible last Wednesday. 

A student in Kinematics wrote the following 
under a problem that he handed in: "Time 
required for this solution, eighteen and one- 
half hours." Before giving it back the in- 
structor placed this query on the paper, "At 
what rate per hour do you work?" 



Alumni and Former Students. 



Jennie Cottrell, '04, who is teaching school 
near Wabaunsee, was among the visitors at 
College Saturday. 

The sad word has l>een received here of the 
death of H. R. Thatcher, "03. at his home near 
Great Bend. Kan. 

F. C. Webb, '04, writes to have his Herald 
sent to Clearwater. He has just returned from 
a three- months' trip to the Pacific coast. 

W. F. Kerr, junior last year, took time from 
his farm work, near idana. Clay county, to at- 
tend the Corn Breeders' meeting last week. 

May Bolton, freshman in '04, and her sister, 
Grace Bolton. '00, who is teaching school near 
Wabaunsee, attended the oratorical contest. 

The friends of Eva Burtner. *0T>. and Prof. 
A. A. Potter, of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering, were somewhat surprised recently 
at the announcement of their engagement. 

A. S. Stauffer. "04. ereeting engineer for 
Fairbanks. Morse* Co.. of Beloit. Wis., was 
renewing acquaintances about College, Satur- 
day, and "yelling for the Hamps." in the eve- 
ning, 

John Griffing. '04. who is running a creamery 
and ice plant in central Oklahoma, was loyal 
to the Franklins and helped secure the music 
for the contest. He came in Friday to visit 
relatives and take in the contest. 

Carl Thompson, '04. who is farming near 
Garrison, and L. V. Sanford. '04. who is in 
the same business near Oneida, attended the 
Corn Breeders' meeting and the oratorical con- 
test last week. 

Josephine Edwards, '05. came up to attend 
the oratorical contest, and went from here to 
Solomon Rapids to visit Winifred Johnson, 
'05. Misses Johnson and Edwards expect to 
visit Dolly Ise, junior last term, at Downs. 

The following is from a letter from John 
Tompkins, senior in '02, who is with the Conti- 
nental Creamerv Co.. Topeka : 

"The stand taken by the Athletic Association 
in regard to awarding sweaters and discourag- 
ing the wearing of monograms by would-be 
athletes meets with my heartiest approval. I 
am pleased to learn that the Athletic Associa- 
tion is becoming a substantial organization, 
and that it is not begging for want of funds, as 
nothing is so discouraging vQ any business as 
to trv to do something without capital. 

"H. T. Nielsen, '03, clover and alfalfa expert 
for Uncle Sam, spent a day with me recently 
while on his way to New Mexico and California 
for a two months' experimental trip. Other 
former K. S. A. C. students that are in Topeka 
to my knowledge are; H. H. Riley, student in 
MI9, with the cost department of the A. T. & S. 
Fe: E. P. Daniels, junior '02, mail carrier in 
the city: T. E. Dial. '04. engineer with the 
Santa Fe; C. D. Blachly. "05. "Skelly" Davis, 
'04: and G. W. Skow, junior in '03, with the 
electrical department of the Santa Fe; E. B. 
Hall and K. P. Mason. '04, attending Wash- 
burn: H. P. Richards, '02. in Santa Fe shops. 



258 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



i 



ONE-FOURTH 
.'. OFF /. 



Let-Go Sale 



COONS 



Twenty -five per cent discount on Men's Suits and Over- 
coats. Why not lay in a good supply now? Our Hand- 
Tailored Hirsch Wickware Graduating Suits included. 



10 per cent off 
on 

Shoes 



Meet 
Our Tailor 



JOHN COONS, of Course 



Largest Stock 
Shoes In City 






and J. E. Manlev, student In '02, secretary of 
Y. M. C. A. 

"In conclusion, I wish old K. S. A. C. and the 
Students' Herald a happy and prosperous 
year, and would like to see her turn out the 
best baseball team she has ever had." With 
kindest regards I remain, 

Yours very truly. 

J. Tompkins, alia* " Tommy." 



Did you hear the Herald staff yell in chapel 
last Saturday morning? 

Assistant Dean stayed at home Sunday eve- 
ning and took care of the baby. 

Editorials on the late unpleasantness ap- 
peared at length in the down-town paper. 

The Hamps. will not give the annual bur- 
lesque on the oratorical contest this year. 

The Printing Department has just published 
two thousand copies of the "College Lyric." 
It was revised by Harry Brown and does not 
contain as many songs as the old book did. 

The State Y. M. C. A. convention will be 
held in Chanute, February 8-11. The local 
association does not expect to send as large a 
delegation as usual, on account of the Nash- 
ville convention. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Pfuetze gave a six-o'clock 
dinner to twelve members of the Faculty, Jan- 
uary 19. Each one present had traveled in 
Europe. The evening was spent in discussing 
their varied experiences. 



New Hats 

tfTT New Shirts tfTT 
Til New Shoes *J] 



The Newest Styles in 
Footwear for Men and 
Women. 



• • •• 



E. L. 



Knostman 



Grand Military and Masquerade Ball 



WILL SB GIVEN BY 



Co. I, First Regiment, K. N.G. 
ON THURSDAY EVENING, FEB. 14, 1906 

At Armory, First and Humboldt Sts. 



A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO All ST V DENTS 



Music by 
Bates' Celebrated Military Orchestra 



By order Co. Comdr. 
CAPT. M. D. 3NODCRASS 



y 






THE STUDENTS' HERALD, 



College Campus Restaurant 

Oysters 25 cents. 

Chilli 15 cents. 

Beef Soup 15 cents. 

CONFECTIONARY, SHORT ORDERS, ETC. 

GARVER & BARRETT, Proprietors. 



•■-* - - - - - « - - -.---*----..-.---.._. ...._....-___ 



NEW AND 2*T 
SCHOOL BOOKS 



R. E. LOFINCK 



SPECTACLES 
GOLD PENS 



DIAMONDS 

JEWELRY, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, FINE CHINA, 

All Musical Instruments and Sheet Music, HALF PRICE. College Supplies, No- 
tions and Sporting Goods. 20 PER CENT OFF ON BIBLES. 



PROFE8SIONA L. 
DR. G. A. CRISE, DENTIST. 



Orr's 



t STUDIO is the place to get 



34 years of continuous practice should be convincing for 
highest skill and perfection. 



PHOTOS of any size or style at 
the most reasonable prices. :: :; 



DR. J. E. TAYLOR, DENTIST. 



Rooms 3 and 4 in Union National Bank Building. Fine 
gold work a specialty. 



North side of Poyntz Avenue 



Res. Phone. Colt 308 R*s. Phone. Cave 140 

Drs. Colt & Cave. 

Ofrtce in Union Natl. 
Bank Bldg.. Downstairs. 



S. N. Hieinbotham 

DEALER IN 

FLOUR, GRAIN and WOOD, 
and HARD and SOFT COAL 

Office Phone 307 j Phone 55 Phone 55 



Office pbone 411 House phone 377 

Dr. H. G. McConnlck, Dentist CZZD 

Union National Bank Building 



Room 16. 



SUBSCRIBE for the HERALD! 
It will do you good 



STUDENTS 

Get your WOOD of the Blue Valley 

Manufacturing Co. Best quality at 

lowest possible prices. 

□ UAKir A MANHATTAN, KAN. 

" PI Xj I T| C W roe N. THIRD ST. 



I 



VARNEY'S - BOOKSTORE 

College Text-Books and College Supplies 



I 



We carry the limoua 

Keuffel A Esser Drawing Materials. 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens. 
Varney Fountain Pens only M, 
Henry Sears & Co. Warrented Knives. 
K. S. A. C. Writing Tablets and Envelopes. 
College Souvenir Postal-cards. 



Varney's Bookstore, 



We carry 

Co-ordinate paper, 
Single-leaf Note-books. 
Higglngs' India Ink. 
"Koh-i-noor Drawing Pencils, 
Eye Shades. 
Lamp Shndes, etc.. etc. 



311 Poyntz Ave. 







260 



THE STUDENTS' HERALD. 



The Place to Buy Your College Supplies is at the 



STUDENTS' 

CO-OPERATIVE 

BOOKSTORE 



We are the acknowledged headquarters for 
all College Supplies. 



Drawing sets, Paper, Inks, Rules, Stationery, etc, 
etc. If we haven't what you want we can get it for 
you; special orders receive prompt attention. 



Also have WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN PEN 



Allingham & Beattie 

DEALERS IN 

FRESH and SALT MEATS and BUTTER- 
IN E. Special Prices to College Clubs. 

J. Q. A. Shelden 

JEWELER and 
OPTICIAN 

K. S. A. C. Pins. Watch & Jewelry Repairing 



bbcL/b GROW 

Elevator on C R. I. fir P. Ry. 

Geo* T, Fielding & Sons, 

Office 11345 N. Second St. 



GASOLINE STOVES 

Lawn Mowers. Lawn Water Hose and General 

Seasonable Goods. Lawn Mowers and Gas 

Stoves Cleaned and Repaired. 

tl ENGEL BROTHERS 



Combination Key Ring, 

Key Tag, Cigar Cutter, 

and Pocket Screw Driver. 




NICKEL PLATE 0. 



"1 f\f"> Remember, you get the v hole 
■vU thing for 10c., Key I i g, a. d 
all. A good Key Ring costs from 5 (o 
1 0c., t4e Cigar Cutter ii ea?i'y worth 25c, 
and the Pocket Screw Priver is alor.e 
worth the pri e of the en'ire comLir ation. 
On t jp. of all this we throw ia the Narre 
Tag. If y; u wint us to stamp your rarre 
and add. -ess on the Tag we will do to ftr 
I Oc. extra. The regular price for this alore 
is 23cV Most people have them stamped 
si that if keys are lost they wi!l be returned 
to the owner. Some don't care to have 
them stamped. We furnish them ei h r 
way. If your dealer doesn't handle them 
you can get them from 

The Taylor Mfg. Co., 

Soto Maonfs;tnrm, HARTFORD, CONN. 



■v *. 



Manhattan Transfer Line 

■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■■ i n ji^ yty .ii. 

Electric- Lighted and Heated Buses and Hacks 

Day and night baggage Line. Meet all trains day or night. Large Wagonettes and Park Phae- 
tons suitable for class parties, etc. Let us call your attention to our up-to-date livery line. Bikes a 
speclulty. 






H. J. Bamhouse PHONE 65 L. W. Phillips 



17 



i 



i 



71 



it 



THE OLD RELIABLE 



»l 



Manhattan Candy Kitchen 



We make all our own 

..Candies.. 

Best Chocolates, Best 
Pan Candies and Best 
Cream Candies :: :: 



*£. 



Phone 1 67 




Oyfters 



All Kinds of 

Ice Cream 

Brick, and all Fruits 
and Flavors Made to 
Order. Prices Right 



W 



<^-w-^^*»j»v%*'* 1 *"W%<*w. ' 



Fountain: 



Everything Up-to-Date in the Drink Line. Finest 
ICE CREAM SODAS 



U 



i 



i 

i 



J 



Buy Your 
Separator 



NOW 



fl 



If you have cows and do not own a Centrifugal 
Cream Separator you certainly need one and 
doubtless know that you do. Cj if so, don't make the 
mistake of delaying its purchase "until spring." Buy it 
NOW and it will have half paid for itself by spring. 
^ Don't let your waste of quantity and quality of butter 
fat go on another six months, particularly while butter values are highest. Q Buy 
your separator NOW, and take the first step toward making this most profitable 
of all farm investments by sending for a DE LAVAL catalogue at once. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 



CHICAGO 

Randolph unci Cunal Sts 

PHILADELPHIA 
1213 Filbert Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

9 and 11 Drmuin Street. 



General Offices: 
74 Cortlandt Street 

NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 

121 Youville Square 

TORONTO 

und it if.»r.< Stress 

WINNIPEG 

218 MnDermet Avenue 



^%S%&%%%X&SX£%%»MMM%»%^^ 



* 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 



W. S. ELLIOT 



WE SELL the best Uniforms for the least money. Confirm 
this statement by asking the older students. X. X 

WE SELL the H. S. & M. Suits and Overcoats. X 

WE ALWAYS HAVE a full assortment of Shop and 
Dairy Suits. **u Ai A, ?%, 

WE CARRY a complete line of Fine Furnishings, Fine 
Shoes, Fine Hats, Fine Caps, Etc. X X X 




IN THE WAY OF CLOTHING * * 

Our large experience in handling student trade during many 
years enables us to meet their wants exactly. X. *W 



312 POYNTZ AVENUE, 



MANHATTAN, KAN. 



*SSfiW»*S«X3«*SS«S^Si»S»Si^ 



1 

* 



<* 
i 



*Big Clearance Sale| 

To reduce stock and make room for New Spring Goods 
we are making SWEEPING REDUCTIONS all through 
the store. All winter Goods must go regardless of cost, as 
we will not carry these Goods over 

BARGAINS IN STATIONERY 

First-class 5-cent envelopes 2 packages for 5 cents 

Good 15-cent box paper 10 cents fog 

One lot 5-cent Dixon's Pencils 2 for 5 cents (3 

Regular 2-for-5-cent pencils 3 for 5 cents 

Regular 3-for-5-cent pencils 4 for 5 cents 

25-cent National Note-books 19 cents 

We haven't space to mention many of the bargains here. It will pay you 'to come in and see for yourself. 



* 

% 
X 

% 
* 

* 

X 

X 

ft 



the BIG RACKET 



C. 



B. 



H 



R 



N